Smash bros japanese name

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Super Smash Bros./Regional Differences

This is a sub-page of Super Smash Bros..

Hmmm...
To do:
More differences. Source

Names

  • Purin is referred to as Jigglypuff, its English, Spanish and Italian name. However, Purin can still be seen written on the map used as the background in 1P Game's "VS. screen."
  • Donkey Kong's name is abbreviated as "D. Kong" in the credits and character selection screen, but it was changed to "DK" for the international release.
  • "Dummy Corps" was renamed to "Fighting Polygon Team".
  • "Battle Royal" was renamed to "Free-for-all".
  • The "New Comers" option in the Backup Clear section of the Option menu was changed to "Newcomers".
  • The name of the bonuses are slightly different:
Japan International
Break the TargetBreak the Targets
Board the PlatformBoard the Platforms
Hurry to the Battle StageRace to the Finish
  • Some terms in the VS Mode player settings, Item Switch menu, and Training Mode are different:
Japan International
MANHMN
COMCPU
NOTN/A
SlowSpeed
NothingNone
EscapeEvade
HomerunBatHomeRunBat
HarisenFan
LayGunRayGun
BombTrooperBob-omb
MonsterBallPokéBall
NearClose-up

If the first three look familiar, it's because these are the terms used by the games' battle debug menu documented here.

  • English translations of the original names of the stages can be seen on the stage select screen in the Japanese version, though some stages gain additional subtitles or have a different translation than those used in international versions:
Japanese Translation Stage
IN THE SKY OF
CASTLE PEACH
Peach's Castle
SECTOR Z
ABORD A GREAT FOX
Sector Z
CLASSIC MUSHROOM
KINGDOM
Mushroom Kingdom
CASTLE OF HYRULE
Hyrule Castle

As a programming oversight, the first line in Peach's Castle Japanese translation is not centered.

Japan International
Not English!Not Japanese!
  • The title screen was given more colors, and the title itself was changed too. It was titled Nintendo All-Star! Dairantou Smash Brothers (ニンテンドウオールスター! 大乱闘スマッシュブラザーズ), which was reduced to Super Smash Bros.. Additionally, "Inc." is "inc." in the last row of credits below the logo.
Japan International
How convenient for us non-Americans!Ever notice that most European versions of games are still in English?
  • Since the menus are in English in all versions, the Japanese version has a text box at the bottom providing the translation for the currently highlighted option. The European version also has this feature if the language is set to French or German.
Japan International
Thanks God they translated this! How else would I know who Mario is?Why did they put spaces between words in Mario Kart 64 but not in the other ones?
  • The "Characters" section of the Data menu mentioned the year and month a game was released in the "Works" section, like in future games, but this was removed; also, the last bracket after the name of a game was thinner in some biographies than it was in others, though they are always thin internationally.
Japan International
"Nintendo All-Stars"?! And who is Luigi?This is probably one of the worst descriptions of Captain Falcon, ever.
  • The background used in the main menu and the screen shown after unlocking a feature was changed to reflect the title used, along with some other cosmetic changes.
Japan International
Wait, controllers are not allowed here?Now it makes sense.
  • The Nintendo 64 controller shown in the screen which appears when the game starts without any controller connected is slightly darker in the Japanese version. It also uses a pink tone in shaded areas, such as the circle around the D-Pad, that was changed to gray. A small pink circle on top of the A button was removed.
Japan International
Sonic approved.Prototype of Mario vs. Donkey Kong.
  • The Training Mode menu does not have spacing between the letters in the meaning of the options, and the options themselves are closer to their meanings; the red arrows between the option have much less spacing. This was changed probably to better accommodate the red line below the highlighted option. Translations of both the highlighted meaning and selected option are shown below the EXIT option.

Sounds

Narrator

  • To accompany the changed title, the announcement is changed, obviously.
Japan International
"Battle Royal"
"Dummy Corps"
"Hurry to the Battle Stage!"
"Free-for-All!"
"Fighting Polygon Team!"
"Race to the Finish!"
  • Some of the narrator announcements change depending on the version of the game. These changes were made to reflect the different names Free-for-All, Fighting Polygon Team, and Race to the Finish have.
  • "Fox" is said less quietly.
  • "Break the Targets" and "Board the Platforms" are, similarly to "Fox", said with more enthusiasm. Also, "target" and "platform" were changed to plural.

Crowd

Character Japan International
Mario
Donkey Kong
Link
Samus
Yoshi
Kirby
Fox
Pikachu
Luigi
Captain Falcon
Ness
Jigglypuff

The crowd cheering noises were changed, either because characters such as Link and Ness have different pronunciations in Japan... or simply because they sounded very weird.

Fox

Fox has two instances of Japanese speech which were removed in international versions; both can be heard in the Japanese version's debug sound test as FGM no. 351 and 358.

"出番だ!" ("My turn!")
  • It is unknown where this particular clip is used, as it does not appear as a taunt or a victory quote. It may actually be unused entirely.
"任務完了!" ("Mission complete!")
  • This audio piece, on the other hand, is used during one of Fox's post-match victory animations, specifically the one where he points his blaster side to side before facing the camera straight on.

Jigglypuff

  • Pokémon who have regionally different names, have different voices and speech as well. Because of that, all sounds used by Jigglypuff were changed. For some weird reason, its three unused sounds were changed too, and it has one extra sound for smash attacks in the Japanese version.
  • Jigglypuff's Pound uses an original sound effect, but it was changed to the sound used when hitting someone with a Fan.

Pokémon

Pokémon Japan International
Blastoise
Chansey
Charmander
Clefairy
Goldeen
Koffing
Snorlax
Venusaur

Some Pokémon who can be summoned from a PokéBall, as well as those who emerges from the door in the Silph Co. building in Saffron City have different voices due to their regionally different names, like Jigglypuff. Every other Pokémon's cry was left alone, either because they didn't actually make a noise resembling their name, because their Japanese name was the same as their English one, or because they didn't have an English anime voice yet.

Attack Sounds

  • The sounds for attacks that hit someone sounds like high-pitched punches and slaps. These have been changed to small explosion sounds, and deeper "punch" sounds. The sound of the Japanese version are still present in the other two versions, available in the game's system debug menu as FGM no. 142 to 147.
  • Luigi's Super Jump Punch when sweetspotted and Jigglypuff's Rest use a normal strong attack sound, but it was changed to the sound used in Ness' side smash and Home-Run Bat if they hit someone. Every Smash Bros. game after this uses the "PING!" sound in all releases.

Beam Sword

The Beam Sword has totally different sounds. It sounded very similar to a lightsaber from the Star Wars trilogy which were changed, probably due to copyright. The same happened in Super Smash Bros. Melee.

Character Sizes

  • Mario and Luigi are a little bigger, though Metal Mario remained the same height.
Japan International
Wow, Kirby has huge arms in this game.Kirby totally sucks in this game... but not in this image.
  • Kirby is a little smaller.

1P Game

  • In Stage 1, in any difficulty settings except for Hard, Link would stand and not attack for a few seconds (excluding floor attacks) if his damage was below 21%. This was changed so that he moves and attacks immediately after the match has started.
  • Congratulatory screens shown after completing the mode were added, perhaps to include a "reward" for doing so.
  • The requirements for unlocking Jigglypuff and Captain Falcon were swapped for each other.

Point Yield

The point yield for most of the bonuses was altered between the Japanese and international versions.

Bonus Japanese International
Normal bonuses
(Time remaining bonus
[excludes bonus stages])
(100 per second) (50 per second)
Booby Trap 8,000 12,000
Bumper Clear 3,000 11,000
Comet Mystic 7,000 10,000
Hawk 10,000 18,000
Heartthrob 8,000 17,000
Heavy Damage 10,000 28,000
Item Strike 10,000 20,000
Item Throw 10,000 16,000
Jackpot 5,000 3,330
Judo Warrior 4,000 5,000
Last Second 10,000 8,000
Lucky 3 8,000 9,990
Mew Catch 8,000 15,000
Mystic 6,000 7,000
No Damage 10,000 15,000
No Item 5,000 1,000
No Miss 1,500 5,000
Pacifist 30,000 60,000
Pokémon Finish 8,000 11,000
Shield Breaker 5,000 8,000
Shooter 5,000 12,000
Smash Mania 3,000 3,500
Smash-less 3,000 5,000
Speedster 8,000 10,000
Star Finish 2,000 10,000
Trickster 8,000 11,000
Vegetarian 5,000 9,000
Stage-specific bonuses
Yoshi Rainbow 15,000 50,000
ARWING Clear 3,000 4,000
Bros. Calamity 12,000 25,000
Good Friend 5,000 8,000
True Friend 30,000 25,000
DK Defender 7,000 10,000
Kirby Ranks 12,000 25,000
Acid Clear 1,000 1,500
No Damage 10,000 15,000
Perfect 10,000 30,000
Completion bonuses
No Damage Clear 300,000 400,000
No Miss Clear 40,000 70,000
Speed Demon 60,000 80,000
Speed King 20,000 40,000
Very Easy Clear 40,000 70,000
Easy Clear 80,000 140,000
Normal Clear 120,000 210,000
Hard Clear 160,000 280,000
Very Hard Clear 200,000 350,000

(Source: [1] and [2])

Saffron City

Japan International
SSB SaffronCityBanner-JP.pngSSB SaffronCityBanner-US.png
  • The banner in the background which says "Got a Catch 'em All!" is missing the second T and has a space there instead, which was fixed. The font also appears to have been rewritten to accommodate this.
Japan International
SSBJapanSilf.pngSSBSilph.png
  • "Silf" on the main building was changed to "Silph". Both are acceptable romanizations, but "Silph" is consistent with the English Red and Blue.

Miscellaneous

  • "(Character) Win!" was corrected to "(Character) Wins!" in the after-match results screen, though it is spelled correctly if the match was a Team Battle.
  • Above the results of the match, the name of the selected mode of the match is displayed along with "Mode" at the end ("Battle Royal Mode", for example), but it was removed, leaving only the name of the mode.
  • The character selection screen in VS Mode, similarly to the change mentioned above, displays the name of the selected mode in the upper-left corner of the screen accompanied with "Mode" at the end, but it was also removed.
  • The "PRESS START BUTTON" alert shown after selecting the character(s) in the selection screen is "PRESS START".
  • A glitch known as "momentum slide" was removed.

How to Play

Hmmm...
To do:
Shorten the videos to only show the "How to Play" section.
Japan International

The "How to Play" tutorial video is slightly different in the Japanese version. The on-screen movements are less refined than in international versions and are often performed slightly out of sync with the controls shown directly below, resulting in a rather crummy tutorial. International versions made the gameplay sync up more smoothly with the instructions as a result.

Some of the differences in the "How to Play" tutorial video include:

  • Luigi does not fast-fall after jumping in the Japanese version.
  • Luigi fights back more in the Japanese version.
  • Luigi does not taunt after Mario grabs the ledge in the Japanese version.
  • The Fire Flower does not fall off in the Japanese version.
  • Luigi hits Mario by throwing the Fire Flower when they are showing off how to use items in the Japanese version.
  • Mario and Luigi do not face each other when they are showing off how to jump in the Japanese version.
  • Mario and Luigi dash sooner when they are showing off how to move in the Japanese version.
  • Luigi techs while Mario is showing off the power moves in the Japanese version.

Changed Attributes

Along with Mario, Luigi and Kirby having different sizes, the game also has various changes applied to the playable characters, some being very drastic. Among the changes, moving the control stick in any direction after taking damage during "hit stop," a brief period where characters are frozen after an attack, is 40% more effective, thus allowing the attacked character to alter his or her position more easily.

Character Changes
Mario
  • Character size scaled up to 1.12 from 1.0.
  • Fireballs deal 1% more damage but deal less base knockback and have less knockback growth.
  • Super Jump Punch travels more distance.
  • Rolls are longer.
Donkey Kong
  • Very slightly heavier; weight changed from .84 to .83.
  • Spinning Kong has more vertical lift from 676.32 to 809.72.
Link
  • Walks slower.
  • Faster falling speed.
  • Slightly larger shield.
  • Some of his attacks deals less damage and have some other changes applied to them:
    • Up tilt deals 5% less damage, is much easier to attack while vulnerable after shielding, and has a more sideways knockback.
    • Up smash deals 1% less damage in the first and second hit.
    • Down aerial deals 2% less damage.
    • Spin Attack deals 1% less damage in the second hit and travels less distance in the air.
    • Bombs deals 1% less damage when thrown down and 2% less damage when thrown any other way, but has more knockback at any percentage.
  • Neutral aerial has more knockback and more diagonal angle.
  • Back aerial's first hit strikes 1 frame slower, and second hit has a more diagonal angle.
  • Boomerang travels less distance and only causes knockback past 100% damage.
Samus
  • Up smash deals more knockback.
  • Up special invincibility frames reduced from 11 to 4.
Yoshi
  • Faster lateral movement speed in the air.
  • Faster falling speed.
  • Very slightly smaller jumps.
  • Down smash deals 1% more damage.
  • Stronger double jump knockback armor.
Kirby
  • Some of his attacks deals less damage:
    • Stone, up and down smashes deals 2% less damage.
    • Up aerial deals 2% less damage at the beginning, and deals 1% less damage shortly after it.
  • Final Cutter travels less distance.
  • Forward throw's knockback angle was changed from horizontal to vertical.
Fox
  • Some of his attacks deals more damage and have some other changes applied to them:
    • Down tilt deals 2% more damage.
    • Fire Fox deals 3% more damage, hits at a vertical angle instead of a horizontal angle, and no longer has any invincibility frames.
    • Blaster deals 1% more damage and has less knockback.
  • Reflector deals less knockback during the start if used in close proximity to another character, and has a different projectile damage multiplier, making the reflected projectile's damage much higher.
Pikachu
  • Thunder Jolt travels less distance.
  • Dash attack has more knockback.
  • Forward smash has more range.
Luigi
  • Character size scaled up to 1.12 from 1.0.
  • Slower lateral movement speed in the air.
  • Fireball travels less distance and makes the attacked character unable to act for a shorter time.
  • Super Jump Punch travels more distance, has slightly less knockback and sends attacked opponents to the side.
  • Rolls are longer.
Captain Falcon
  • Runs faster.
  • Jumps are lower.
  • Faster falling speed.
  • Falcon Dive travels less distance vertically.
Ness
  • Some of his attacks deals different damage and have some other changes applied to them:
    • PK Fire deals 3% more damage in the first hit, and deals 1% more damage in every other hit.
    • All smashes deals 2% less damage.
    • Up tilt deals 1% less damage and has more knockback.
    • Up aerial deals 2% less damage.
    • When launched by his own PK Thunder, Ness deals 5% less damage, flies shorter, and takes more time to be able to act when he lands.
Jigglypuff
  • Down smash has more range on both sides.
  • Rest deals 6% more damage.

(Source: SmashWiki)

iQue Player Differences

In 2005, the game was released in China for the iQue Player. This version of the game is based on the international version, but has a few minor differences (mostly to reflect the change in language).

Logo

Nintendo 64 iQue Player
SSB64-logo.pngSSBiQue-logo.png
  • The Nintendo 64 logo was replaced with the iQue logo.

Title Screen

International China
Super Smash Bros.-title.pngSSBiQue-title.png
  • The copyright info on the title screen was updated and now uses a larger font.
  • The menu icons for the N64 controller and console were replaced with icons of the iQue player controller and multitap.
International China
SSBCharactersMenu.pngSSBiQue-characterbio.png
  • The works section in the characters menu was removed possibly due to the fact that many of the games referenced were never officially localized in China.
International China
SSB TrainingCharacters-US.pngSSB TrainingCharacters-iQue.png
  • In Training Mode, The CPU layout was red instead of grey.

Credits

  • iQue Engineering was added as the game's localizers.
  • Surprisingly, the NOA staff is still credited, but 4kids TV was replaced with TOP-INSIGHT International for providing the Pokémon voices.
  • A line of text was added at the end of the credits: "This staff credits are based on the original N64."

No Controller

Nintendo 64 iQue Player
SSBController.pngSSBiQue-nocontroller.png
  • Oddly, the "No Controller" screen was updated and translated despite it being impossible to see since the iQue Player console is built in to the controller and is thus always plugged in.
Original Translation
没有手柄。没有连接好的手柄。请把游戏机电源关掉并接上手柄。No controller. No connected controllers. Please turn off the game console and connect a controller.

(Source: Chinese Nintendo (Translation))

Stages

Sector Z

International China
SSB GreatFox-US.pngSSB GreatFox-iQue.png
  • The "Star Fox" logo on the Great Fox was changed, which was the same thing on the iQue version of Star Fox 64.

Saffron City

International China
SSB SaffronCityBanner-US.pngSSB SaffronCityBanner-iQue.png
  • The banner in the background was changed to "Catch, catch, catch!!!".

Congratulations Screen

All of the character congratulation screens (except for Link and Fox), had the English text changed to Chinese.

Sours: https://tcrf.net/Super_Smash_Bros./Regional_Differences

Super Smash Bros. (series)

NameNorth American box-art / logo(s)Japanese nameConsoleRelease date(s)Relevance to The Legendary Starfy series
Super Smash Bros.Super Smash Bros NA boxart.jpgニンテンドウオールスター! 大乱闘スマッシュブラザーズ,
Nintendo All-Stars! Dairantou Smash Brothers
Nintendo 64Japan</spanJanuary 21, 1999
USAApril 26, 1999
EuropeNovember 19, 1999
No relevance.
Super Smash Bros. MeleeSuper Smash Bros Melee NA boxart.png大乱闘 スマッシュ ブラザーズDX,
Dairantou Smash Brothers DX
Nintendo GameCubeJapan</spanNovember 21, 2001
USADecember 3, 2001
EuropeMay 24, 2002
AustraliaMay 31, 2002
No relevance.
Super Smash Bros. BrawlSSBB Cover.jpeg大乱闘スマッシュブラザーズX,
Dairantou Smash Brothers X
WiiJapan</spanJanuary 31, 2008
USAMarch 9, 2008
AustraliaJune 26, 2008
EuropeJune 27, 2008
South KoreaApril 29, 2010
Super Smash Bros. Brawl marked the appearance of Starfy ("Stafy") as an Assist Trophy and Trophy, a Starly ("Stapy") Trophy, as well as Stickers of Starfy, Starly, Moe (Kyorosuke), Chonmagyo, Mattel (Materu), Seiuchi-kun and Herman (Yadokarita).
Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DSSSB 3DS boxart.png大乱闘スマッシュブラザーズ for Nintendo 3DSNintendo 3DSJapan</spanSeptember 13, 2014
USAOctober 3, 2014
EuropeOctober 3, 2014
Starfy reappears as a regular Trophy and an Assist Trophy
Super Smash Bros. for Wii USSB Wii U boxart.png大乱闘スマッシュブラザーズ for Wii UWii UJapan</spanWinter 2014
USAHoliday 2014
EuropeHoliday 2014
Starfy reappears as a regular Trophy and an Assist Trophy, and is also an online profile icon
Super Smash Bros. UltimateSSB Ultimate boxart.png大乱闘スマッシュブラザーズ SPECIALNintendo SwitchDecember 7, 2018 Starfy reappears as an Assist Trophy and online profile icon. Starfy, Starly, Moe, Mermaid, Mattel and Old Man Lobber appear as Spirits.
Sours: https://www.starfywiki.org/wiki/Super_Smash_Bros._(series)
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Super Smash Bros.

Series of crossover fighting games

This article is about the video game series. For the first video game in the series, see Super Smash Bros. (video game). For the professional wrestling tag team, see Super Smash Brothers (professional wrestling).

Video game series

Super Smash Bros.[a] is a crossoverfighting game series published by Nintendo, and primarily features characters from various Nintendo franchises. The series was created by Masahiro Sakurai, who has directed every game in the series. The gameplay objective differs from that of traditional fighters in that the aim is to increase damage counters and knock opponents off the stage instead of depleting life bars.

The original Super Smash Bros. was released in 1999 for the Nintendo 64. The series achieved even greater success with the release of Super Smash Bros. Melee, which was released in 2001 for the GameCube and became the bestselling game on that system. A third installment, Super Smash Bros. Brawl, was released in 2008 for the Wii. Although HAL Laboratory had been the developer for the first two games, the third game was developed through the collaboration of several companies. The fourth installment, Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U, was released in 2014 for the Nintendo 3DS and Wii U, respectively. The 3DS installment was the first for a handheld platform. A fifth installment, Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, was released in 2018 for the Nintendo Switch.

The series features many characters from Nintendo's most popular franchises, including Super Mario, Donkey Kong, The Legend of Zelda, Metroid, Yoshi,Kirby, Star Fox, and Pokémon. The original Super Smash Bros. had only 12 playable characters, with the roster count rising for each successive game and later including third-party characters, with Ultimate containing every character playable in the previous games. In Melee, Brawl, and Ultimate, some characters are able to transform into different forms that have different styles of play and sets of moves. Every game in the series has been well received by critics, with much praise given to their multiplayer features, spawning a large competitive community that has been featured in several gaming tournaments.

Gameplay

Gameplay in the Super Smash Bros. series differs from many fighting games.[1] Instead of winning by depleting an opponent's life bar, players seek to launch their opponents off the stage and out of bounds. Characters have a damage total which rises as they take damage, represented by a percentage value that measures up to 999%. As a character's percentage rises, the character can be knocked progressively farther by an opponent's attacks.[2] To knock out an opponent, the player must knock that character outside the stage's boundaries in any direction.[3] When a character is launched off the stage, the character can attempt to "recover" by using jumping moves and abilities to return to the stage.[2] Some characters have an easier time recovering onto the stage than others due to their moves and abilities. Additionally, some characters vary in weight, with lighter characters being easier to launch than heavy characters.[4]

Controls are greatly simplified in comparison to other fighting games, with one button used for standard attacks and another used for special attacks.[1] Players can perform different types of moves by holding the directional controls up, down, to the side, or in a neutral position while pressing the attack or special button.[2] As such, each character has four types of ground attacks, mid-air attacks, and special attacks that can be performed.[2] Quickly pressing or tapping a directional input and the attack button together while on the ground allows players to perform a chargeable "Smash Attack", which is generally more powerful than other attacks.[2] When characters are hit by attacks, they receive a hitstun that temporarily disallows any attacks to be made. This allows combos to be performed. A shield button allows players to put up a defensive shield which weakens with repeated use and will leave the player unable to move if broken. Combining the shield button with directional inputs and attack buttons allows the player to also perform dodges, rolls, grabs, and throws.[5] The three basic actions in Super Smash Bros., attacking, grabbing, and shielding, are often described using a rock–paper–scissors analogy: attacking beats grabbing, grabbing beats shielding, and shielding beats attacking.[6] When a player knocks another player off of the main platform, they may perform an action called edge-guarding.[7] At the same time the player that has been knocked off will try to recover by jumping back onto the stage and avoiding the other players' edge-guarding.[2]

Another element in the Super Smash Bros. series is battle items, the abundance of which players can adjust them before matches. There are conventional "battering items", with which a player may hit an opponent, such as a home-run bat or a beam sword; throwing items, including Bob-ombs and Koopa shells; and shooting items, either single-shot guns or rapid-fire blasters. Recovery items allow the user to reduce their damage percentage by varying amounts. Poké Balls are special items that release a random Pokémon onto the battlefield to temporarily assist the user. Brawl introduced the Assist Trophy item which serves a similar purpose; instead of releasing Pokémon, it summons a character from another series.[8]Brawl also introduces the Smash Ball, which when broken allows the fighter to perform a character-specific super attack known as a "Final Smash".[8]

The rules that can be used in a match vary depending on the game, but the two most commonly used settings across all games are Time and Stock. Time mode uses a point-based system in which fighters earn points for knocking out their opponents and lose points for being knocked out or self-destructing (i.e. falling out of the stage by themselves). The player with the highest score at the end of the set time limit wins the match. Stock mode, also known as Survival, uses a life-based system in which players are given a set number of lives, known as stock, with each fighter losing a life whenever they are knocked out, becoming eliminated if they run out of lives. The winner is the last fighter standing once all other fighters are eliminated or, if a time limit is applied to the match, the fighter with the most lives remaining once time runs out. In the event of a tie, a Sudden Death match takes place. Here, each of the tied fighters are given a starting damage percentage of 300%, making them easier to launch off the stage, and the last fighter standing will be declared as the winner. In some games this process is repeated if the match ends in another tie.

Gameplay using competitive Super Smash Bros. rules is usually played in Stock mode with a timer.[9] Items are turned off, and the only tournament-legal stages are those that do not feature hazards and other disruptive elements.[10]

Games

Super Smash Bros. (1999)

Main article: Super Smash Bros. (video game)

Super Smash Bros. was introduced in 1999 for the Nintendo 64. It was released worldwide after selling over a million copies in Japan.[11] It featured eight characters from the start (Mario, Donkey Kong, Link, Samus, Yoshi, Kirby, Fox, and Pikachu), with four unlockable characters (Luigi, Captain Falcon, Ness, and Jigglypuff), all of them created by Nintendo or one of its second-party developers.

In Super Smash Bros., up to four players can play in multiplayer (Versus) mode, with the specific rules of each match being predetermined by the players. There are two match types that can be chosen: Time, where the person with the most KOs at the end of the set time wins; and stock, where each player has a set number of lives and are eliminated from play when their lives are depleted.

This game's primary single-player mode, named "Classic Mode" in later series entries, features a series of predetermined opponents the player must defeat. Other single-player modes exist such as Training and several minigames, including "Break the Targets" and "Board the Platforms". All of these were included in the sequel, with the exception of "Board the Platforms".

There are nine playable stages in Versus mode, eight based on each of the starting characters (such as Princess Peach's Castle for Mario, Zebes for Samus, and Sector Z for Fox) and the unlockable Mushroom Kingdom, based around motifs from the original Super Mario Bros., even containing original sprites and the original version of the Overworld theme from that game.

Super Smash Bros. Melee (2001)

Main article: Super Smash Bros. Melee

A followup for the GameCube, Super Smash Bros. Melee, released in Japan and North America in late 2001, and in Europe and Australia in May 2002. It had a larger budget and development team than Super Smash Bros. did[12] and was released to much greater praise and acclaim among critics and consumers. Since its release, Super Smash Bros. Melee has sold more than 7 million copies and was the bestselling game on the GameCube.[13]Super Smash Bros. Melee features 26 characters, of which 15 are available initially, more than doubling the number of characters in its predecessor. There are also 29 stages.

It introduced two new single-player modes alongside the Classic mode: Adventure mode and All-Star mode. Adventure mode has platforming segments similar to the original's "Race to the Finish" mini-game, and All-Star is a fight against every playable character in the game, allows the player only one life in which damage is accumulated over each battle and a limited number of healing items in between battles. Also in Melee is the Home-Run Contest minigame, which replaced Board the Platforms in the original game. Here, fighters will have to send Sandbag out of the stage to get the best distance with a baseball bat while damaging it for ten seconds.

There are also significantly more multiplayer modes and a tournament mode allowing for 64 different competitors whom can all be controlled by human players, although only up to four players can participate at the same time. Additionally, the game featured alternative battle modes, called "Special Melee," which allows players to make many different alterations to the battle, along with alternative ways to judge a victory, such as through collecting coins throughout the match.[2]

In place of Super Smash Bros.' character profiles, Melee introduced trophies (called "figures" in the Japanese version). The 293 trophies include three different profiles for each playable character, one unlocked in each single-player mode. In addition, unlike its predecessor, Melee contains profiles for many Nintendo characters who are either non-playable or do not appear in the game, as well as Nintendo items, stages, enemies, and elements.

Super Smash Bros. Brawl (2008)

Main article: Super Smash Bros. Brawl

Although a third Super Smash Bros. game had been announced long before E3 2006, Nintendo unveiled its first information in the form of a trailer in 2006, and the game was named Super Smash Bros. Brawl and released worldwide in 2008. The game featured a set of third-party characters, Solid Snake of Konami's Metal Gear series, and longtime Mario rival Sonic the Hedgehog from Sega's series of the same name. Brawl was also the first game in the franchise to support online play, via the Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection,[14] and to offer the ability for players to construct their own original stages.[15] The game features a total of 39 playable characters and 41 stages.

Brawl also features compatibility with four kinds of controllers (the Wii Remote on its side, the Wii Remote and Nunchuk combination, the Classic Controller, and the GameCube controller),[16] while its predecessors only used the one controller designed for that system. The player also has the ability to change the configuration of controls and the controller type.[17]

Super Smash Bros. Brawl features a single-player mode known as The Subspace Emissary. This mode features unique character storylines along with numerous side-scrolling levels and multiple bosses to fight, as well as CGcut scenes explaining the storyline. The Subspace Emissary features a new group of antagonists called the Subspace Army, who are led by the Ancient Minister. Some of these enemy characters appeared in previous Nintendo video games, such as Petey Piranha from the Super Mario series and a squadron of R.O.B.s based on classic Nintendo hardware. The Subspace Emissary also boasts a number of original enemies, such as the Roader, a robotic unicycle; the Bytan, a one-eyed ball-like creature which can replicate itself if left alone; and the Primid, enemies that come in many variations.[18] Though primarily a single-player mode, The Subspace Emissary allows for cooperative multiplayer. There are five difficulty levels for each stage, and there is a method of increasing characters' powers during the game.[19] This is done by placing collected stickers onto the bottom of a character's trophy between stages to improve various aspects of a fighter.[20]

Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U (2014)

Main article: Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U

At E3 2011, it was confirmed that a fourth Super Smash Bros. game would be coming to the Nintendo 3DS and Wii U, with the two games being cross-compatible with each other.[21][22][23] Sakurai stated that the announcement was made public in order to attract developers needed for the games, as development for the games did not start until May 2012 due to production on Kid Icarus: Uprising.[24][25] On June 21, 2012, Nintendo announced that the creation of the games would be a co-production between Sakurai's Sora Ltd. and Bandai Namco Entertainment.[26] The games were officially revealed at E3 2013, with new information being released via trailers, Nintendo Direct presentations, and developer posts on Miiverse.[27] The game features 58 characters,[28] 19 of whom are new, and 7 of whom are downloadable. The game was released for Nintendo 3DS in Japan in September 2014, and in North America, Europe, and Australia the following month. The Wii U version was released in North America, Europe, and Australia in November 2014, and in Japan the following month.[29][30][31]

Super Smash Bros. Ultimate (2018)

Main article: Super Smash Bros. Ultimate

In April 2014, Bandai Namco Entertainment posted a recruitment advertisement on a Japanese career job opportunity website. The recruitment page consisted of a listing for programmers for "Smash Bros. 6", which was expected to be released in 2015 for both the Wii U and Nintendo 3DS. The page noted there were 120 game developers working on the project at the time, and that Bandai Namco expected that number to increase to 200. However, shortly after its publication, the page was taken down.[32] In a January 2015 column in Weekly Famitsu, Sakurai alluded to the possibility of retirement, expressing doubt that he would be able to continue making games if his career continued to be as stressful as it was.[33] In December 2015, Sakurai once again stated that he was not sure if there would be another game in the Smash Bros. series.[34]

On March 8, 2018, a teaser for the game was shown during a Nintendo Direct.[35][36][37] Sakurai later confirmed that he had worked on the game "in silence, day after day."[38][39] On March 22, 2018, Nintendo announced that they would host another Super Smash Bros. Invitational tournament, in which a selected group of players would get to play the game for the first time and compete in a series of matches before a winner is chosen. The tournament took place alongside the Splatoon 2 World Championship at E3 2018 and was held on June 11–12. Both events were live streamed on Nintendo's official YouTube and Twitch channels.[40] The title was confirmed as Super Smash Bros. Ultimate at E3 2018, where it was also announced that it would contain all playable characters from every previous game.[41]

The game was released worldwide on December 7, 2018; according to the review aggregator platform Metacritic, it received "universal critical acclaim" from critics and scored 93 out of 100.[42] In addition to all returning characters, the base game release adds 11 newcomers. Twelve additional new characters are also available via downloadable content, with the final character currently in development for release later in 2021.[43]

Like Brawl, Ultimate features a story mode, known as World of Light. The plot revolves around the destruction of the Smash Bros. world at the hands of original villain Galeem. Initially only able to play as Kirby, who survived the attack, the player travels across the wasteland to rescue the other playable fighters, gathering "Spirits" (the remnants of the world's non-playable characters who aid the player in battle) along the way.

Characters

Main article: Characters in the Super Smash Bros. series

Each game in the series has a number of playable characters (referred in the games as "fighters") taken from various gaming franchises, with 83 total across the series. Starting with Super Smash Bros. Brawl, characters from non-Nintendo franchises began to make playable appearances. In Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U, players were able to customize existing fighters with altered movesets and abilities, as well as making their own Mii fighters that can be given three different fighting styles. There are also other non-playable characters that take the form of enemies, bosses, and summonable power-up items.

Development

The Super Smash Bros.emblem, which usually appears as the "O" in the full logo. The cross represents the idea of crossovers, with the four sectors representing the four-player fighting mode.

Super Smash Bros. was developed by HAL Laboratory, an independent affiliate company, during 1998. It began as a prototype created by Masahiro Sakurai and Satoru Iwata in their spare time, Dragon King: The Fighting Game, and featured no Nintendo characters. However, Sakurai hit on the idea of including fighters from different Nintendo franchises in order to provide "atmosphere" which he felt was necessary for a home console fighting game, and his idea was approved.[44] Although never acknowledged by Nintendo or any developers behind Super Smash Bros., third-party sources have identified Namco's 1995 fighting game The Outfoxies as a possible inspiration.[45][46][47] The game had a small budget and little promotion, and was originally a Japan-only release, but its huge success saw the game released worldwide.[48]

HAL Laboratory developed Super Smash Bros. Melee, with Masahiro Sakurai as the head of production. The game was one of the first games released on the GameCube and highlighted the advancement in graphics from the Nintendo 64. The developers wanted to pay homage to the debut of the GameCube by making an opening full motion video sequence that would attract people's attention to the graphics.[49]HAL worked with three separate graphic houses in Tokyo to make the opening sequence. On their official website, the developers posted screenshots and information highlighting and explaining the attention to physics and detail in the game, with references to changes from its predecessor.[50] The Super Smash Bros. logo, consisting of two lines of different weight crossing within a circle, represented the idea of a franchise crossover, according to Sakurai, naturally dividing the circle into four sections to represent the four-player fighting mode.[51]

At a pre-E3 2005 press conference, president of Nintendo at the time Satoru Iwata announced the next installment of Super Smash Bros. was not only already in development for their next gaming console, but hoped it would be a launch game with Wi–Fi compatibility for online play.[52] The announcement was unexpected to the creator of the Super Smash Bros. series, Masahiro Sakurai. Back in 2003, he had left HAL Laboratory, the company that was in charge with the franchises' development and was never informed of this announcement despite the fact shortly after resigning from the company, Iwata said if a new game was to be made, he would be in charge. It was not until after the conference Sakurai was called to Satoru Iwata's room on the top floor of a Los Angeles hotel, where he was told by Iwata "We'd like you to be involved in the production of the new Smash Bros., if possible near the level of director".[53] Although Iwata had said he was hoping for it to be a launch game, Sakurai stated: "I decided to become director. And as of May 2005, I was the only member of the new Smash Bros. development team." Development of the game never actually started until October 2005,[54] when Nintendo opened a new office in Tokyo just for its production. Nintendo also enlisted outside help from various developer studios, mainly Game Arts. Sakurai also stated that these people had spent excessive amounts of time playing Super Smash Bros. Melee. This team was given access to all the original material and tools from the development of Melee, courtesy of HAL Laboratory. Also, several Smash Bros. staff members that reside around the area of the new office joined the project's development.[55][56]

On the game's official Japanese website, the developers explain reasons for making particular characters playable and explain why some characters were not available as playable characters upon release. Initially, the development team wanted to replace Ness with Lucas, the main character of Mother 3 for the Game Boy Advance, but they retained Ness in consideration of delays.[57] The game's creators have included Lucas in the game's sequel, Super Smash Bros. Brawl.[58][59] Video game developer Hideo Kojima originally requested Solid Snake, the protagonist of the Metal Gear series, to be a playable character in Super Smash Bros. Melee, but the game was too far in development for him to be included. As with Lucas, development time allowed for his inclusion in Brawl. Roy and Marth were initially intended to be playable exclusively in the Japanese version of Super Smash Bros. Melee. However, they received favorable attention during the game's North American localization, leading to the decision for the developers to include them in the Western version. Comparisons have been formed by the developers between characters which have very similar moves to each other on the website. Such characters were referred to as "clones" in the media.

At the Nintendo Media Conference at E3 2007, it was announced by Nintendo of America president Reggie Fils-Aimé that Super Smash Bros. Brawl would be released on December 3, 2007 in the Americas. However, just 2 months before its anticipated December release, the development team asked for more time to work on the game. During the Nintendo Conference on October 10, 2007, Nintendo Co., Ltd. president Iwata announced the delay.

On October 11, 2007, George Harrison of Nintendo of America announced that Super Smash Bros. Brawl would be released on February 10, 2008 in North America.[60] On January 15, 2008, the game's release was pushed back one week in Japan to January 31 and nearly a month in the Americas to March 9.[61] On April 24, 2008, it was confirmed by Nintendo of Europe that Brawl will be released in Europe on June 27.[62]

Director Masahiro Sakurai first announced that a new Super Smash Bros. game was planned for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U at E3 2011 in June 2011, but development only officially began following the completion of Sakurai's other project, Kid Icarus: Uprising, in March 2012.[63][64] The game was later revealed to be a joint-project between Sora Ltd. and Bandai Namco Games, with various staff members from Bandai Namco's Soulcalibur and Tekken series assisting Sakurai in development.[65][66][67] Sakurai, who was previously the sole person responsible for balance in the series' multiple fighters, has involved more staff to further improve the game's competitive balance.[68] The game was officially revealed at E3 2013 on June 11, 2013 during a Nintendo Direct presentation.[69] Along with screenshots being posted each weekday on the game's official website and Miiverse community,[70] various cinematic trailers were released, introducing each of the brand new fighters. Sakurai chose to use these trailers, which benefit from Internet sharing, as opposed to including a story campaign similar to the Subspace Emissary mode featured in Brawl, as he believed the impact of seeing the mode's cinematic cutscenes for the first time was ruined by people uploading said scenes to video sharing websites.[71][72]

At E3 2013, Sakurai stated that the tripping mechanic introduced in Brawl was removed, with him also stating that the gameplay was between the fast-paced and competitive style of Melee and the slower and more casual style of Brawl.[73] While the games didn't feature cross-platform play between the Wii U and 3DS, due to each version featuring certain exclusive stages and gamemodes, there is an option to transfer customized characters and items between the two versions.[74] The game builds upon the previous game's third-party involvement with the addition of third-party characters such as Capcom's Mega Man and Bandai Namco's Pac-Man, as well as the return of Sega's Sonic the Hedgehog. This involvement expands beyond playable characters, as other third-party characters, such as Ubisoft's Rayman, are also included in the game as trophies.[75] The addition of Mii characters was made in response to the growing number of requests from fans to have their dream characters included in the game. To prevent potential bullying, as well as to maintain game balance online, Mii Fighters cannot be used in online matches against strangers.[76] The decision to release the Wii U version at a later date from the 3DS version was made to allow each version to receive a dedicated debugging period.[77] Hardware limitations on the Nintendo 3DS led to various design choices, such as the removal of mid-match transformations, the absence of the Ice Climbers, and the lack of Circle Pad Pro support.[78]

Music

Super Smash Bros. features music from some of Nintendo's popular gaming franchises. While many are newly arranged for the game, some songs are taken directly from their sources. The music for the Nintendo 64 game was composed by Hirokazu Ando, who later returned as sound and music director in Melee. Melee also features tracks composed by Tadashi Ikegami, Shougo Sakai, and Takuto Kitsuta.[79]Brawl featured the collaboration of 38 contracted composers,[80] including Final Fantasy series composer Nobuo Uematsu, who composed the main theme.[81] Like in Brawl, Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U featured many original and re-arranged tracks from various different gaming franchises from a variety of different composers and arrangers. Both versions have multiple musical tracks that can be selected and listened to using the returning "My Music" feature, including pieces taken directly from earlier Super Smash Bros. games. The 3DS and Switch games allow players to listen to their music from the sound menu while the system is in sleep/handheld mode.[82][83]Ultimate continued the trend of multiple composers and arrangers working on remixed tracks, having over 800 in total.[83][84]

Three soundtrack albums for the series have been released. An album with the original music for Super Smash Bros. was released in Japan by Teichiku Records in 2000.[85] In 2003, Nintendo released Smashing...Live!, a live orchestrated performance of various pieces featured in Melee by the New Japan Philharmonic.[86] A two-disc promotional soundtrack titled A Smashing Soundtrack was available for Club Nintendo members who registered both the 3DS and Wii U games between November 21, 2014 and January 13, 2015.[87]

Reception

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This section needs expansion with: prose reception about Ultimate. You can help by adding to it. (February 2021)

Reviews for the Super Smash Bros. series are usually positive. The multiplayer mode in every game is usually highly praised; however, single-player modes have not always been viewed as highly.

Super Smash Bros. received praise for its multiplayer mode. Nintendo Power listed the series as being one of the greatest multiplayer experiences in Nintendo history, describing it as infinitely replayable due to its special moves and close-quarters combat.[99] There were criticisms, however, such as the game's scoring being difficult to follow.[100] In addition, the single-player mode was criticized for its perceived difficulty and lack of features.

Super Smash Bros. Melee generally received a positive reception from reviewers, most of whom credited Melee's expansion of gameplay features from Super Smash Bros. Focusing on the additional features, GameSpy commented that "Melee really scores big in the 'we've added tons of great extra stuff' department." Reviewers compared the game favorably to Super Smash Bros.—IGN's Fran Mirabella III stated that it was "in an entirely different league than the N64 version"; GameSpot's Miguel Lopez praised the game for offering an advanced "classic-mode" compared to its predecessor, while detailing the Adventure Mode as "really a hit-or-miss experience." Despite a mixed response to the single-player modes, most reviewers expressed the game's multiplayer mode as a strong component of the game. In their review of the game, GameSpy stated that "you'll have a pretty hard time finding a more enjoyable multiplayer experience on any other console."

Brawl received a perfect score from the Japanese magazine Famitsu. The reviewers praised the variety and depth of the single-player content,[101] the unpredictability of Final Smashes, and the dynamic fighting styles of the characters. Thunderbolt Games gave the game 10 out of 10, calling it "a vastly improved entry into the venerable series". Chris Slate of Nintendo Power also awarded Brawl a perfect score in its March 2008 issue, calling it "one of the very best games that Nintendo has ever produced". IGN critic Matt Casamassina, in his February 11 Wii-k in Reviewpodcast, noted that although Brawl is a "solid fighter," it does have "some issues that need to be acknowledged," including "long loading times" and repetition in The Subspace Emissary.

Super Smash Bros. for 3DS and Super Smash Bros. for Wii U both garnered critical praise and were commercially successful, holding current ratings of 85/100 and 92/100 on Metacritic and 86.10% and 92.39% on GameRankings.[102][94][103][104] Reviewers have particularly noted the large, diverse character roster, the improvements to game mechanics, and the variety of multiplayer options. Some criticisms in the 3DS version include a lack of single-player modes and issues concerning the 3DS hardware, such as the size of characters on the smaller screen when zoomed out and latency issues during both local and online multiplayer.[105][106] There were also reports of players damaging their 3DS Circle Pads while playing the game excessively.[107][108] The Wii U version's online play quality was mildly criticized for some inconsistency, but has overall been critically acclaimed. Daniel Dischoff of Game Revolution stated "It's true that Super Smash Bros. evolves every time with regard to new features, items, and characters to choose from. While your favorite character may not return or a few annoying pickups may force you to turn off items altogether, this represents the biggest leap forward Smashers have seen yet." Daniel Starky at GameSpot criticized the inconsistent online performance in the game, but still called it an "incredible game", noting "With the Wii U release, Smash Bros. has fully realized its goals." Jose Otero from IGN, praising the replayability of the game, states "Nearly every aspect of Smash Wii U seems fine-tuned not only to appeal to the nostalgia of long-time Nintendo fans, but also to be accessible to new players."

Sales

Super Smash Bros. sold 1.4 million copies in Japan,[109] and 2.3 million in the U.S.,[110] with a total of 5.55 million units worldwide.[88]Melee sold over 7 million units worldwide, becoming the best-selling GameCube game.[13]Brawl sold 1.524 million units in Japan as of March 30, 2008[update],[111] and sold 1.4 million units in its first week in the United States, becoming Nintendo of America's fastest selling game.[112] The 3DS version sold over a million copies in its first weekend on sale in Japan,[113] and has sold more than 9.59 million copies worldwide as of March 2020[update].[93]Super Smash Bros. for Wii U became the fastest-selling Wii U game to date, selling 3.39 million units worldwide within just two months of availability, beating the record previously held by Mario Kart 8.[114] As of September 2018, it has sold 5.35 million copies worldwide.[95]Super Smash Bros. Ultimate on Nintendo Switch has set new record highs for the series and for the system.[115][116] It sold an estimate of 5.6 million copies in global sales during its first week of launch, beating out records previously held by games such as Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu! and Let's Go, Eevee!, Super Mario Odyssey, and The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild.[117] In Japan, Ultimate outsold the records held by Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS with 2.6 million copies sold in five weeks.[118] It is also the third best-selling game for the Nintendo Switch and the best-selling fighting game of all time, with 22.85 million copies sold worldwide as of December 2020.[97]

Esports

Main article: Super Smash Bros. in esports

The Super Smash Bros. series has been widely played as competitive video games and has been featured in several high-profile tournaments. The first publicized Super Smash Bros. Melee tournaments were held in early 2002.[119] From 2004 to 2007, Melee was on Major League Gaming's tournament roster.[120] In 2010 MLG picked up Brawl for its pro circuit for a year. During this time, Nintendo prohibited MLG from live streamingBrawl matches.[121] At 2014 MLG Anaheim Melee was once again hosted at an MLG event. Melee was also included at the Evolution Championship Series (Evo) in 2007, a fighting game tournament held in Las Vegas. Melee was again hosted at Evo 2013 after it won a charity drive to decide the final game to be featured in its tournament lineup.[122][123] Due to the large turnout and popularity that year, Evo again included a Melee tournament at their 2014 and 2015 events.[124]New Jersey-based Apex was another prominent Super Smash Bros. tournament organizer, being officially sponsored by Nintendo in 2015.[125]

Notes

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Super Smash Bros. Ultimate - All Fighters Announced in All Languages [HD 1080P]

Super Smash Bros.

Non-canon
This article or section contains non-canon information.
This article is about the video game. For the series, see Super Smash Bros. (series).
Super Smash Bros.
大乱闘 スマッシュ ブラザーズDairantou Smash Brothers
Smash64BoxUS.jpg
North American boxart
SystemNintendo 64
iQue player
RereleasesWii (Virtual Console)
GenreFighting
RatingE (Everyone)
PublisherNintendo
DeveloperNintendo
HAL Laboratory
Release dates
JapanJanuary 21, 1999
North AmericaApril 26, 1999
EuropeNovember 19, 1999
Other boxart

Smash64BoxJP.jpg
Japanese boxart


Super Smash Bros. (Japanese: 'ニンテンドウオールスター! 大乱闘スマッシュブラザーズ'Nintendo All-Star! Great Fray Smash Brothers) is the game that began the landmark fighting series Super Smash Bros. It was originally released in Japan for the N64 on January 21, 1999, in North America on April 27, 1999, and in Europe on November 19, 1999. In 2009 it was re-released for the Wii's Virtual Console. Featuring representation from many different Nintendo franchises, it is not considered as part of any of them, but a separate one instead. The game represents the EarthBound series with Ness as a playable character.

Characters

The game features a total of twelve playable characters, four of which must be unlocked by fulfilling certain conditions. Bold denotes EarthBound characters.

Unplayable characters

Stages

There are 9 playable stages stages in this game that can be played in all modes, 1 of which needs to be unlocked by playing the 1P game with the 8 starter characters. There are no EarthBound stages.

Unlockable stages are shown in italic.

Game modes

Super Smash Bros. features two main game modes, single-player and multiplayer.

1 Player Mode

The single-player mode. The player can play in the 1P Game, Bonus Practice 1 and 2, or the Training Mode.

1P Game

Also referred to as Classic Mode, the player has to go through a series of 12 different matches and 3 bonus stages. This is the only mode where you fight non-playable characters. The matches are as follows:

  • 1 Vs. Link The player faces Link in a 1-vs-1 on Hyrule Castle.
  • 2 Vs. Yoshi Team The player faces a hoard of Yoshis on Yoshi's Island.
  • 3 Vs. Fox The player faces Fox in a 1-vs-1 on Sector Z.
  • Bonus stage 1: Break the Targets
  • 4 Vs. Mario Bros. The player faces Mario and Luigi on Peach's Castle in a 2-vs-2 with a randomly selected ally.
  • 5 Vs. Pikachu The player faces Pikachu in a 1-vs-1 on Saffron City.
  • 6 Vs. Giant Donkey Kong The player is teamed up with 2 other randomly selected allies to take down a giant D.K. on Congo Jungle.
  • Bonus stage 2: Board the Platforms
  • 7 Vs. Kirby Team The player faces a hoard of Kirbys on Dream Land.
  • 8 Vs. Samus The player faces Samus in a 1-vs-1 on Planet Zebes.
  • 9 Vs. Metal Mario The player faces Metal Mario in a 1-vs-1 on Meta Crystal.
  • Bonus stage 3: Race to the Finish
  • 10 Vs. Fighting Polygon Team. The player must fight the hoard of Fighting Polygons on Duel Zone.
  • 11 Vs. Master Hand The final stage. The player faces Master Hand on Final Destination.

Bonus Practice 1 - Break the Targets

The player has to break 10 targets in a specific character's assigned stage before time runs out.

Bonus Practice 2 - Board the Platforms

The player must stand 10 on platforms in a specific character's assigned stage before time runs out.

Bonus Stage 3 - Race to the Finish

The player must make it to a door in one minute while avoiding 2 hazardous areas and 3 Fighting Polygons This bonus stage can only be played in 1P Game.

Training Mode

A mode used to practice fighting with a wider selection of customizable options than in Vs Mode.

Vs. Mode

The multiplayer mode. In this mode the player can face 1 to 3 other players or CPUs with a few customizable options. It's the only mode that other people can play.

Time Mode

There's a time limit set to fight. The limit can be set in 1 minute increments from 1 to 99 minutes. If 2 or more players tied once time is up, the tied opponents have to fight in Sudden Death mode. The player with the most KOs wins.

Stock Mode

Each player has an amount of lives. The stocks can be set from 1 to 99. Once one player loses all of his or her lives, they are out of the match. The last player standing wins.

Team Mode

This can either be Time or Stock Team modes. Everyone's in a specific team. The players in the same teams can't hurt each other. The team that earns the most points or is the last one(s) standing wins. There's 3 colors of teams: Red, Blue, and Green. In Team Stock Mode, if a player has lost all of his or her stocks, another player from their team can give them another live from one of theirs until they all have one life.

EarthBound representation

Official artwork of Ness from Super Smash Bros.

EarthBound's main representation is in the form of Earthbound's protagonist Ness, who makes his debut in this game as an unlockable fighter. He can be fought on Dream Land after clearing Classic Mode on normal difficulty with 3 stocks or less without continuing.

Although a lot of Ness's moves are original, he does have some references to his home series. His smash attacks involve the use of his yo-yo and baseball bat, weapons that Ness can equip. All of his special attacks are also based off of PSI moves: his neutral special is PK Fire, where he shoots out a fiery projectile that can trap opponents; his up special is PK Thunder, where he summons a stream of lightning that can me moved around the stage, as well as acting as his recovery when launched into him; and his down special is PSI Magnet, which allows him to absorb and heal from energy-based projectiles. Ness cannot learn any of the PSI moves that he uses in Smash.

Aside from Ness, the only other representation EarthBound has in Smash 64 is Ness's victory fanfare, which is based off of the last four melodies from EarthBound's Eight Melodies.

Sours: https://wikibound.info/wiki/Super_Smash_Bros.

Name japanese smash bros

Super Smash Bros.

Something's gone wrong in the happy-go-lucky world of Nintendo!
—North American commercial
Super Smash Bros.
NTSC box art of Super Smash Bros.. From Super Mario Wiki.
Box ssb pal.jpg
Box ssb j.jpg
Developer(s)HAL Laboratory, Inc.
Publisher(s)Nintendo
Designer(s)Masahiro Sakurai
ReleasedNintendo 64:
Japan January 21, 1999
North America April 26, 1999
Europe November 19, 1999

iQue Player:
China November 15, 2005

Virtual Console:
Japan January 20, 2009
Europe June 12, 2009
North America December 21, 2009
Genre(s)Fighting game
Platforming
Mode(s)Single-player, multiplayer (2-4)
RatingsESRB: E
PEGI: 7
OFLC: G8+
Platform(s)Nintendo 64
iQue Player
Virtual Console
Media128 megabit cartridge
Flash Card (China)

Super Smash Bros. (also called Super Smash Bros. 64, Smash 64 or Super Smash Bros. N64), released in Japan as Nintendo All Star! Dairantō Smash Brothers (ニンテンドウオールスター! 大乱闘スマッシュブラザーズ, Nintendo All-Star! Great Fray Smash Brothers), often shortened to "SSB", retronymously "Smash 64" or "SSB64", is the first game of the Super Smash Bros. series.

The game released in Japan on January 21st, 1999, in North America on April 26th, 1999 and in Europe on November 19th, 1999 for the Nintendo 64. Subsequently, it released on the iQue Player in China on November 15, 2005. The Wii's Virtual Console version released on January 20th, 2009 in Japan, a day before its 10-year anniversary and later that year in Europe and North America. However, because the Wii Shop Channel ceased operations on January 30th, 2019 (with the ability to add Wii Points permanently removed on March 26, 2018), the only way to currently obtain the game is by purchasing a used copy or playing it on an emulator.

Super Smash Bros. received positive reviews, with most praise going to its multiplayer mode, while its single-player mode received some criticism. The game has sold 5 million units worldwide as of 2001, making it the fifth best-selling Nintendo 64 game of all time.

Opening movie[edit]

The opening movie in Super Smash Bros., unlike later games in the Super Smash Bros. series, completely lacks pre-rendered footage. It instead opts to use the game engine to render everything in real-time.

When the opening movie starts, two random starter characters are placed by Master Hand on top of a desk, which shortly transitions to a scene resembling Peach's Castle. This process is repeated every time the opening movie is played.

As the opening movie concludes, the figures of the four unlockable characters are flashed against a white background. If a character hasn't been unlocked, they will simply be shown as a silhouette; conversely, they will be revealed once unlocked.

Finally, the opening movie segues into the title screen, a trend which would be followed by future installments, along with the announcer calling out the game's title.

Fighters[edit]

Official artwork of the default cast of Smash 64.
The character-selection screen of Super Smash Bros.(all characters unlocked).

There are twelve playable characters in Super Smash Bros., eight of whom are available from the start and four of whom are unlockable.

The highest amount of character slots are given to the Super Mario and Pokémon universes with each receiving two fighters: Mario alongside his brother Luigi, and Pikachu and Jigglypuff respectively, with the latter characters in both universes being unlockable.

Two more slots are given to reoccurring Mario characters Donkey Kong and Yoshi as starting fighters from their sub-universes of the same names, Donkey Kong and Yoshi.

The other starter characters are Link, Samus, Kirby and Fox from The Legend of Zelda, Metroid, Kirby and Star Fox universes, respectively. The final remaining characters, as with Luigi and Jigglypuff, are unlockable: Ness of EarthBound and Captain Falcon of F-Zero.

Stages[edit]

The stage select screen of Super Smash Bros.

The game features nine stages derived from each character's universe, exceptions being EarthBound and F-Zero. While most universes receive a single stage, Mario uniquely has two instead: Peach's Castle and the only unlockable stage in the game, Mushroom Kingdom. Besides of that, the other stages consist of Congo Jungle, Hyrule Castle, Planet Zebes, Yoshi's Island, Dream Land, Sector Z, and Saffron City from Donkey Kong, The Legend of Zelda, Metroid, Yoshi, Kirby, Star Fox, and Pokémon respectively.

Versus mode stages[edit]

Shown in bold, Mushroom Kingdom is the only unlockable stage in Super Smash Bros.

1P Game-only stages[edit]

These stages only appear in the 1P Game.
*The 1P Game-only Yoshi's Island lacks clouds and has closer blast zones.

Non-playable stages[edit]

These stages cannot be unlocked or played on in any way without hacking.

Modes[edit]

1-Player[edit]

Multiplayer[edit]

Tournament play[edit]

Main article: Tournament legal (SSB)

Unlike its successors, Super Smash Bros. never enjoyed a large professional competitive scene in North America. However, interest in the game has been renewed in recent years with the popularity of its sequels. Players can play Super Smash Bros. online through Kaillera using the Project64k emulator. Every year, there are more and more Super Smash Bros.tournaments due to an influx of new players. Most tournaments are paired with Melee events and most (offline) SSB tournaments are located in California, Canada, New Jersey or Peru.

The standard tournament rules differ little from those of Melee. The most common standard tournament rules are as follows:

  • The required number of victories to win are generally the best of 3 matches; the only exceptions are finals, in which the number of matches is 5 or 7.
  • Tournaments run double elimination format.
  • 4 stock with a 10-minute time limit, if possible; the original game does not support time limits on stock matches, but emulators and mods can implement one.
  • Items are disabled.
  • Handicaps are off.
  • The first match is played on Dream Land.
  • For the first match, characters are chosen double-blind - at the same time, so that neither player knows their opponent's character beforehand.
  • Players may re-pick characters after each match. However, the loser of each match gets to pick last (known as slob picks).

Development[edit]

Masahiro Sakurai was interested in making a fighting game for four players. His initial design for the game was called Kakuto-Geemu Ryuoh (Dragon King: The Fighting Game),[1] which featured simple characters. After presenting the game to co-worker Satoru Iwata, he helped Sakurai continue on with the project. Sakurai understood that many fighting games did not sell well, so he tried to make his game original.[1] His first idea was to include famous Nintendo characters and send them into the fray.[1] Knowing full well that he would not receive permission to do so, Sakurai created a prototype of the game without sanction from Nintendo and did not inform them until he was sure the game was well-balanced.[1] The prototype he presented featured Mario, Donkey Kong, Samus Aran, and Fox McCloud as playable characters. The idea was later approved.[1][2] Although never acknowledged by Sakurai or any developers behind Super Smash Bros., third party sources have identified Namco's 1995 fighting game The Outfoxies as a possible inspiration,[3][4] with Sakurai also crediting the idea of making a beginner-friendly fighting game to an experience in which he handily defeated a couple of casual gamers on The King of Fighters '95 in an arcade.[5]

Super Smash Bros. features music from Nintendo's most popular gaming franchises. While many tracks are new arrangements for the game, some songs attempt to directly emulate their sources. The music for Super Smash Bros. was composed by Hirokazu Ando, who later returned as sound and music director for Super Smash Bros. Melee. A complete soundtrack was released on CD in Japan through Teichiku Records in 2001.[6]

Reception[edit]

Super Smash Bros. was a commercial success, selling 5 million copies worldwide with 2.93 million sold in the United States and 1.97 million copies sold in Japan. It was the 5th best selling game for the Nintendo 64. Reviews were mostly positive, with many critics praising the game's addictive and fun multiplayer gameplay and simple controls, but it was criticized as well, mainly due to the game's lower amount of content and somewhat limited single-player mode.

Gallery[edit]

  • Super Smash Bros. U.S. box art (Player's Choice version)

  • Super Smash Bros. Chinese box art

  • The logo from the SSB64 Website.

  • A image of the cast from the SSB64 Website.

Regional differences[edit]

How to Play[edit]

In the Japanese version, the on-screen movements for the "How to Play" tutorial video are less refined than in international versions and are often performed slightly out of sync with the controls shown directly below. International versions made the gameplay sync up more smoothly with the instructions as a result.

Some of the differences in the "How to Play" tutorial video include:

  • Luigi does not fast-fall after jumping in the Japanese version.
  • Luigi fights back more in the Japanese version.
  • Luigi does not taunt after Mario grabs the ledge in the Japanese version.
  • The Fire Flower does not fall off in the Japanese version.
  • Luigi hits Mario by throwing the Fire Flower when they are showing off how to use items in the Japanese version.
  • Mario and Luigi do not face each other when they are showing off how to jump in the Japanese version.
  • Mario and Luigi dash sooner when they are showing off how to move in the Japanese version.
  • Luigi techs while Mario is showing off the power moves in the Japanese version.

Saffron City[edit]

  • In the Japanese version, the banner in the stage background which says "Got a Catch 'em All!" is missing the second T and has a space there instead, which was fixed in the international versions. The font also appears to have been rewritten to accommodate this.
  • "Silf" on the main building was changed to "Silph".

Character sizes[edit]

  • Mario and Luigi were made a little bigger in the international versions, though Metal Mario remained the same height.
  • Kirby is a little smaller in the international versions.

1P Game[edit]

  • In the Japanese version for Stage 1, on any difficulty settings except for Hard, Link would stand and not attack for a few seconds (excluding floor attacks) if his damage was below 21%. This was changed so that he moves and attacks immediately after the match has started.
  • The Japanese version does not have the congratulatory screens shown after completing the mode.
  • The requirements for unlocking Jigglypuff and Captain Falcon were swapped for each other for the international versions.

Point yield[edit]

The point yield for most of the bonuses were altered between the Japanese and international versions.

Bonus Japanese International
Normal bonuses
(Time remaining bonus
[excludes bonus stages])
(100 per second) (50 per second)
Booby Trap 8,000 12,000
Bumper Clear 3,000 11,000
Comet Mystic 7,000 10,000
Hawk 10,000 18,000
Heartthrob 8,000 17,000
Heavy Damage 10,000 28,000
Item Strike 10,000 20,000
Item Throw 10,000 16,000
Jackpot 5,000 3,330
Judo Warrior 4,000 5,000
Last Second 10,000 8,000
Lucky 3 8,000 9,990
Mew Catch 8,000 15,000
Mystic 6,000 7,000
No Damage 10,000 15,000
No Item 5,000 1,000
No Miss 1,500 5,000
Pacifist 30,000 60,000
Pokémon Finish 8,000 11,000
Shield Breaker 5,000 8,000
Shooter 5,000 12,000
Smash Mania 3,000 3,500
Smash-less 3,000 5,000
Speedster 8,000 10,000
Star Finish 2,000 10,000
Trickster 8,000 11,000
Vegetarian 5,000 9,000
Stage-specific bonuses
Yoshi Rainbow 15,000 50,000
ARWING Clear 3,000 4,000
Bros. Calamity 12,000 25,000
Good Friend 5,000 8,000
True Friend 30,000 25,000
DK Defender 7,000 10,000
Kirby Ranks 12,000 25,000
Acid Clear 1,000 1,500
No Damage 10,000 15,000
Perfect 10,000 30,000
Completion bonuses
No Damage Clear 300,000 400,000
No Miss Clear 40,000 70,000
Speed Demon 60,000 80,000
Speed King 20,000 40,000
Very Easy Clear 40,000 70,000
Easy Clear 80,000 140,000
Normal Clear 120,000 210,000
Hard Clear 160,000 280,000
Very Hard Clear 200,000 350,000

Differences from later Super Smash Bros. games[edit]

Super Smash Bros. is the only game in the series with the following distinctions:

  • Using the phrases "Game Set" and "Time Up" for matches in all regions. Later games use the phrases "Game!" and "Time!" in the English version, while each one still uses "Game Set" and "Time Up" in the Japanese version.
  • Break the Targets! and Race to the Finish are announced "Break the Target" and "Hurry to the Final Stage", respectively in the Japanese version, as Melee uses the names from the international release.
  • Lacking Home-Run Contest and Multi-Man Smash modes.
  • Featuring Board the Platforms bonus game.
  • Time and stock matches share the same announcer voice clip (not counting team battles).
  • Using traffic signals instead of numbers for the "3, 2, 1... Go!" announcement before a match begins.
  • Lacking home stages from the F-Zero and EarthBound universes. As a result, Captain Falcon's home stage is Planet Zebes and Ness's is Dream Land, as those two stages are the ones that take place when unlocking them via a Challenger Approaching battle.
  • Introducing starters from the Star Fox universe.
  • Lacking princesses (or any multiple female characters aside from Samus) as playable characters.
  • Featuring only one character from the The Legend of Zelda and Star Fox universes.
  • Introducing new characters from the Yoshi and F-Zero universes.
    • However this trait can apply to F-Zero as fighters from sub-franchises can also count as Mario characters.
  • To be released in the 1990s.
  • Not having Bowser as the heaviest character, as he did not make his first playable appearance until Melee. Rather, the heaviest character is Donkey Kong.
  • Featuring only playable protagonists. However, two characters had previously appeared as antagonists -- Donkey Kong in Donkey Kong, its Game & Watch counterpart, Donkey Kong 3 and Donkey Kong (Game Boy), and Mario in Donkey Kong Jr. and Donkey Kong Circus.
  • Being rated "E" for Everyone by the ESRB, as its successors Super Smash Bros. Melee and Super Smash Bros. Brawl would be rated "T" for Teen, and Super Smash Bros. 4 and Super Smash Bros. Ultimate would be rated "E10+" for players who are aged ten and over.
  • Showing the character's 3D model when selecting them on the Character Selection Screen, as later titles would use artwork of the characters instead.
  • Showing the stage's 3D model when highlighted on the Stage Selection screen, as well as restricting the cursor to the squares depicting the stage.
  • Not having Battlefield and Final Destination as normally playable stages.
  • Not featuring spot dodges, air dodges, charged smash attacks, side special moves, pummels, up throws or down throws, as these would be added in later games.
  • Having multiple crowd reactions for when a character recovers.
  • Having characters freely get Star KO'd when they reach the upper blast line without suffering from knockback or taking any damage.
  • Not introducing at least one Fire Emblem character, although Marth was originally planned to be playable.
  • The enemy team can get Star or Screen KO'd under normal circumstances, with the only exception in the later games being Melee's Event 37: Legendary Pokémon.

Staff[edit]

Main article: List of staff (SSB)

Trivia[edit]

  • The starting eight characters are placed in the order of when they first appeared (as a whole) in their respective debut titles on the character selection screen, starting with the oldest, Mario and Donkey Kong, and ending with the most recent, Pikachu. This same order is used when listing the cast of the original Super Smash Bros. in later games, such as when organizing trophies and fighter numbers. This chronological ordering also applies to the four unlockable characters on the character selection screen, though this is only relative to each other and not the other characters.
  • Super Smash Bros. marks the first appearance of Samus, Kirby, and Ness in 3D.
    • Additionally, this game is both Samus and Ness's only appearance on the N64.
  • This game has the fewest amount of unlockable characters with four.
  • This game is one of two that uses 2D illustrations on the box art, alongside Super Smash Bros. Ultimate.
  • This game is one of two Super Smash Bros. games to not feature Adventure Mode, the second being Super Smash Bros. 4.
  • This game is one of two Super Smash Bros. games to not feature All-Star Mode, the second being Super Smash Bros. Ultimate.
  • If the player achieves No Miss x11 at the end of Classic Mode, the announcer will say "Incredible!" instead of "Congratulations!" on the victory screen.
  • Counting both versions of Super Smash Bros. 4 as one game, this is the only game in the series with more fighters than stages.
  • Despite Super Smash Bros. having its own Australian version, the European version was used for Australia's Virtual Console.
  • Although the iQue player has a built-in controller, a message, albeit in Chinese, exists dictating that the controller isn't plugged in.[12]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ abcdeIwata Asks: Super Smash Bros. Brawl. Nintendo. Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  2. ^社長が訊く『大乱闘スマッシュブラザーズX』 (Japanese). Nintendo. Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  3. ^Holmes, Jonathan. "Six Days to Smash Bros. Brawl: Top Five Smash Bros alternatives", Destructoid, March 3, 2008. 
  4. ^Sullivan, Lucas (September 19, 2014). 15 Smash Bros. rip-offs that couldn't outdo Nintendo.
  5. ^MacDonald, Keza (August 8, 2018). From Kong to Kirby: Smash Bros' Masahiro Sakurai on mashing up 35 years of gaming history. The Guardian.
  6. ^Nintendo All-Star! Dairanto Smash Brothers Original Soundtrack. Soundtrack Central (2002-01-17). Retrieved on 2008-04-16.
  7. ^ニンテンドウ64 - ニンテンドウオールスター!大乱闘スマッシュブラザーズ. Weekly Famitsu. No.915 Pt.2. Pg.32. 30 June 2006.
  8. ^Gerstmann, Jeff (1999-02-18). Super Smash Bros. Review. GameSpot. Retrieved on 2008-04-26.
  9. ^Schneider, Peer (1999-04-27). Super Smash Bros. Review. IGN. Retrieved on 2008-04-26.
  10. ^ abSuper Smash Bros. Reviews. GameRankings. Retrieved on 2013-07-14.
  11. ^Super Smash Bros. (n64: 1999): Reviews. Metacritic. Retrieved on 2013-07-14.
  12. ^No Controller.
Sours: https://www.ssbwiki.com/Super_Smash_Bros.
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Super Smash Bros. (video game)

1999 crossover fighting video game published by Nintendo

1999 video game

Super Smash Bros.[a] (retroactively referred to as Super Smash Bros. 64 or Smash 64) is a 1999 crossoverfighting video game developed by HAL Laboratory and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo 64. It was first released in Japan on January 21, 1999, in North America on April 26, 1999,[1][2] and in Europe on November 19, 1999. The first installment in the Super Smash Bros. series, it is a crossover between several different Nintendo franchises, including Mario, The Legend of Zelda, Star Fox, Yoshi, Donkey Kong, Metroid, F-Zero, Mother, Kirby, and Pokémon. It presents a cast of characters and locations from these franchises and allows players to use each character's unique skills and the stage's hazards to inflict damage, recover health, and ultimately knock opponents off the stage.

Super Smash Bros. received mostly positive reviews upon its release. It was a commercial success, selling over five million copies worldwide by 2001, with 2.93 million sold in the United States and 1.97 million sold in Japan.[4][5] It was given an Editors' Choice award from IGN for the "Best Fighting Game",[6] and also became a Nintendo 64 Player's Choice title. The game spawned a series of sequels for each successive Nintendo console, starting with Super Smash Bros. Melee which was released for the GameCube in 2001.

Gameplay[edit]

See also: Gameplay of the Super Smash Bros. series

The Super Smash Bros. series is a departure from the general genre of fighting games; instead of depleting an opponent's life bar, Smash Bros. players seek to knock opposing characters off a stage. Each player has a damage total, represented by a percentage, which rises as the damage is taken and can reach maximum damage of 999%. As this percentage rises, the character is knocked progressively farther by attacks. To knock out (KO) an opponent, the player must send that character flying off the edge of the stage, which is not an enclosed arena but rather an area with open boundaries.[7] When knocked off the stage, a character may use jumping moves in an attempt to return; some characters have longer-ranged jumps and may have an easier time "recovering" than others.[8] Additionally, characters have different weights, making it harder for heavier opponents to be knocked off the edge, but harder for them to recover once sent flying.

While games such as Street Fighter and Tekken require players to memorize complicated button-input combinations, Super Smash Bros. uses the same control combinations to access all moves for all characters.[9] Characters are additionally not limited to only facing opponents, instead being allowed to move freely. The game focuses more on aerial and platforming skills than other fighting games, with larger, more dynamic stages rather than a simple flat platform. Smash Bros. also implements blocking and dodging mechanics. Grabbing and throwing other characters is also possible.

Various weapons and power-ups can be used in battle to inflict damage, recover health, or dispense additional items. They fall randomly onto the stage in the form of items from Nintendo franchises, such as Koopa shells, hammers, and Poké Balls.[10] The nine multiplayer stages are locations taken from or in the style of Nintendo franchises, such as Planet Zebes from Metroid and Sector Z from Star Fox. Although stages are rendered in three dimensions, players move within a two-dimensional plane. Stages are dynamic, ranging from simple moving platforms to dramatic alterations of the entire stage. Each stage offers unique gameplay and strategic motives, making the chosen stage an additional factor in the fight.

In the game's single-player mode, the player battles a series of computer-controlled opponents in a specific order, attempting to defeat them with a limited number of lives in a limited amount of time. While the player can determine the difficulty level and the number of lives, the series of opponents never changes. If the player loses all of their lives or runs out of time, they can continue at the cost of a loss of overall points. This mode is referred to as Classic Mode in later games.[11] The single-player mode also includes two minigames, "Break the Targets" and "Board the Platforms", in which the objective is to break each target or board multiple special platforms, respectively. A "Training Mode" is also available in which players can manipulate the environment and experiment against computer opponents without the restrictions of a standard match.

Up to four people can play in multiplayer mode, which has specific rules predetermined by the players. Stock and timed matches are two of the multiplayer modes of play.[12] This gives each player a certain number of lives or a selected time limit, before beginning the match with a countdown. Free-for-all or team battles are also a choice during matches using stock or time. A winner is declared once time runs out, or if all players except one or a team have lost all of their lives. A multiplayer game may also end in a tie if two or more players have the same score when the timer expires, which causes the match to end in sudden death. During sudden death, all fighters are given 300% damage and the last fighter standing will win the match.

Characters[edit]

See also: Characters in the Super Smash Bros. series

The game includes twelve playable characters from popular Nintendo franchises.[13] Characters have a symbol appearing behind their damage meter corresponding to the series to which they belong, such as a Triforce behind Link's and a Poké Ball behind Pikachu's. Furthermore, characters have recognizable moves derived from their original series, such as Samus's charged blasters and Link's arsenal of weapons.[14] Eight characters are initially playable, and four additional characters can be unlocked by meeting specific criteria.

The character art featured on the game's box art and instruction manual is in the style of a comic book, and the characters are portrayed as toy dolls that come to life to fight. This style has since been omitted in later games, which feature trophies instead of dolls and in-game models rather than hand-drawn art.[15]

Development[edit]

Super Smash Bros. was developed by HAL Laboratory, a Nintendo second-party developer, during 1998. Masahiro Sakurai was interested in making a fighting game for four players. As he did not yet have any original ideas, his first designs were of simple base characters. He made a presentation of what was then called Kakutō Gēmu Ryūō (格闘ゲーム竜王, Dragon King: The Fighting Game)[16] to co-worker Satoru Iwata, who helped him continue. Sakurai understood that many fighting games did not sell well and that he had to think of a way to make his game original.[16] His first idea was to include famous Nintendo characters and put them in a fight.[16] Knowing he would not get permission, Sakurai made a prototype of the game without sanction from Nintendo and did not inform them until he was sure the game was well-balanced.[16] The prototype he presented featured Mario, Donkey Kong, Samus and Fox as playable characters.[17] The idea was later approved.[16][18] Although never acknowledged by Nintendo or any developers behind Super Smash Bros., third-party sources have identified Namco's 1995 fighting game The Outfoxies as a possible inspiration,[19][20][21] with Sakurai also crediting the idea of making a beginner-friendly fighting game to an experience in which he handily defeated a couple of casual gamers on The King of Fighters '95 in an arcade.[22]

Multiple characters were planned for the game but were cut during development at some point, including Marth, King Dedede, Bowser, and Mewtwo. All of these characters were added to later games.[23]

Super Smash Bros. features music from some of Nintendo's popular gaming franchises. While many are newly arranged for the game, some pieces are taken directly from their sources. The music for Super Smash Bros. was composed by Hirokazu Ando, who later returned as sound and music director for Super Smash Bros. Melee. A complete soundtrack was released on CD in Japan through Teichiku Records in 2000.[24]

Reception[edit]

Reception

PublicationAward
IGNBest Fighting Game

Critically, Super Smash Bros. garnered positive reviews, with most of the praise going towards its multiplayer-player mode,[12][6][27][37] music,[12] "original" fighting game style,[37] and simple learning curve.[12][27] There were criticisms, however, such as the game's scoring being difficult to follow[38] and the single-player mode's perceived difficulty and lack of features,[6] with GameSpot's former editorial director, Jeff Gerstmann, noting the single-player game "won't exactly last a long time".[12]Super Smash Bros. was commercially successful, becoming a Nintendo 64 Player's Choice title, selling 1.97 million copies in Japan[5] and 2.93 million in the United States as of 2008.[4]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^Known in Japan as Nintendo All Star! Dai Rantō Smash Brothers (ニンテンドウオールスター!スマッシュブラザーズ, Nintendō ōru sutā! Dai rantō sumasshu burazāzu)
  2. ^Super Smash Bros., in Electronic Gaming Monthly's review, was scored by three critics 8.5/10, another one 9/10.[28]

References[edit]

  1. ^ abc"Super Smash Bros". IGN. IGN Entertainment, Inc. Archived from the original on January 22, 2016. Retrieved September 1, 2013.
  2. ^ ab"Super Smash Bros". GameSpot. CBS Interactive Inc. Archived from the original on September 1, 2013. Retrieved September 1, 2013.
  3. ^ ab"US Platinum Game Chart". The Magic Box. Archived from the original on January 6, 2007. Retrieved December 7, 2006.
  4. ^ ab"Japan Platinum Game Chart". The Magic Box. Archived from the original on December 13, 2007. Retrieved June 17, 2008.
  5. ^ abcdSchneider, Peer (April 27, 1999). "Super Smash Bros. Review". IGN. Archived from the original on May 12, 2008. Retrieved April 26, 2008.
  6. ^"The Basic Rules". Smash Bros. DOJO!!. Smashbros.com. May 22, 2007. Archived from the original on April 13, 2012. Retrieved April 15, 2008.
  7. ^"You Must Recover!". Smash Bros. DOJO!!. Smashbros.com. June 6, 2007. Archived from the original on March 2, 2012. Retrieved April 15, 2008.
  8. ^Peer Schneider (April 27, 1999). "Super Smash Bros. review". IGN. Archived from the original on February 7, 2012. Retrieved April 16, 2008.
  9. ^"Smash Bros. DOJO!!". Archived from the original on March 18, 2008.
  10. ^Sakurai, Masahiro (October 30, 2007). "Classic". Smashbros.com. Archived from the original on April 30, 2008. Retrieved June 1, 2008.
  11. ^ abcdefGerstmann, Jeff (February 18, 1999). "Super Smash Bros. Review". GameSpot. Archived from the original on July 25, 2008. Retrieved April 26, 2008.
  12. ^Mirabella III, Fran; Peer Schenider; Craig Harris. "Guides: Super Smash Bros. Melee–Characters". IGN. Archived from the original on January 10, 2011. Retrieved December 22, 2007.
  13. ^Mirabella III, Fran; Peer Schenider; Craig Harris. "Guides: Super Smash Bros. Melee–Samus Aran". IGN. Archived from the original on January 31, 2009. Retrieved December 22, 2007.
  14. ^Sakurai, Masahiro (September 24, 2007). "Trophies". Smashbros.com. Archived from the original on May 3, 2008. Retrieved June 5, 2008.
  15. ^ abcde"Iwata Asks: Super Smash Bros. Brawl". Nintendo. Archived from the original on December 17, 2019. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  16. ^"The Man who made Mario fight". Hobby Consoles (202): 22. 2008.
  17. ^"社長が訊く『大乱闘スマッシュブラザーズX』" [Iwata Asks: Super Smash Bros. Brawl] (in Japanese). Nintendo. Archived from the original on January 26, 2011. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  18. ^Burns, Ed (November 22, 2012). "The Outfoxies". Hardcore Gaming 101. Archived from the original on April 22, 2018.
  19. ^Holmes, Jonathan (March 3, 2008). "Six Days to Smash Bros. Brawl: Top Five Smash Bros alternatives". Destructoid. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016.
  20. ^Sullivan, Lucas (September 19, 2014). "15 Smash Bros. rip-offs that couldn't outdo Nintendo". GamesRadar+. Archived from the original on November 15, 2017.
  21. ^MacDonald, Keza (August 8, 2018). "From Kong to Kirby: Smash Bros' Masahiro Sakurai on mashing up 35 years of gaming history". The Guardian. Archived from the original on September 20, 2019. Retrieved February 26, 2020.
  22. ^Soma (April 29, 2016). "The Definitive List of Unused Fighters in Smash". Source Gaming. Archived from the original on June 12, 2020. Retrieved June 12, 2020.
  23. ^"Nintendo All-Star! Dairanto Smash Brothers Original Soundtrack". Soundtrack Central. January 17, 2002. Archived from the original on October 11, 2008. Retrieved April 16, 2008.
  24. ^ ab"Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 64". GameRankings. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on December 11, 2018. Retrieved November 1, 2018.
  25. ^"Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 64 Reviews". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on November 5, 2013. Retrieved July 14, 2013.
  26. ^ abcPenniment, Brad. "Super Smash Bros. > Review". Allgame. Archived from the original on December 1, 2014. Retrieved May 9, 2008.
  27. ^"Super Smash Bros". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 119. June 1999. p. 131. Retrieved July 5, 2021.
  28. ^Conlin, Shaun. "Super Smash Bros". The Electric Playground. Archived from the original on February 27, 2005. Retrieved July 5, 2021.
  29. ^ニンテンドウ64 - ニンテンドウオールスター!大乱闘スマッシュブラザーズ. Weekly Famitsu. No.915 Pt.2. Pg.32. June 30, 2006.
  30. ^"Famitsu Scores Smash Bros". IGN. November 14, 2001. Archived from the original on March 20, 2012. Retrieved April 26, 2008.
  31. ^"Super Smash Bros. Review". Archived from the original on October 7, 2000.
  32. ^Dr. Moo. "Super Smash Brothers". GameRevolution. Archived from the original on January 5, 2000. Retrieved July 5, 2021.
  33. ^Kornifex (December 13, 1999). "Super Smash Bros Test". Jeuxvideo.com (in French). Archived from the original on May 3, 2021. Retrieved July 5, 2021.
  34. ^Bickham, Jes (May 1999). "Smash Bros". N64 Magazine. No. 28. pp. 74–75. Retrieved July 5, 2021.
  35. ^"Finals". Next Generation. No. 54. Imagine Media. June 1999. p. 94.
  36. ^ abWeir, Dale (July 5, 1999). "Game Critics Review". GameCritics.com. Archived from the original on February 25, 2012. Retrieved May 9, 2008.
  37. ^"Game Critics Review". gamecritics.com. Archived from the original on February 25, 2012.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Super_Smash_Bros._(video_game)

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