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What’s the Best Casio Digital Piano with Weighted Keys?

Casio is a long-standing company known for its many electronic products like calculators, watches, and keyboards.  Yet for many, the name Casio means entry level keyboards only, tailored more for beginners. In reality, the Casio line of digital pianos is more varied and far reaching than previously thought, with instruments that have features more suited for intermediate pianists as well as students.

Most pianists would agree that in addition to good tone, one of the most important features in a digital piano is its feel. In fact, it’s desirable for the keyboard to have a similar feel to an acoustic piano. Weighted keys offer a way for plastic keyboards to mimic the heaviness of traditional wooden piano keys.

It’s important for beginners and students to learn on a weighted key piano, as well. If a student develops habits while playing on a light weight keyboard, he or she will have a difficult time adjusting to an acoustic piano in the future.

Therefore, in this article, we will discuss our five favorite Casio digital pianos with weighted keys.  We will discuss more affordable options (under $1,500).  To better help you learn about these notable Casio pianos, please use our interactive guide below to directly compare them to one another.

Casio CDP-240

The most inexpensive of the five Casio pianos we will be discussing today is the Casio CDP 240.  You can purchase this 88 key digital piano for around $450 or so.  The Casio CDP-240 is also an Amazon exclusive digital piano. 

Casio CDP-240: Is this the best Casio digital piano money can buy?

Unlike many inexpensive keyboards in this price range, the CDP-240 doesn’t use springs to operate the keys. Instead, it uses a similar mechanical action as a grand piano. Its keys work by using a graded hammer action. The hammer action works using the same mechanics as acoustic pianos.

The “graded” feature of the CDP 240’s keys is very important in capturing the realistic feel of an acoustic piano’s keys.  On an acoustic piano, the lower keys take more force the strike than higher keys.  Casio has scaled the weighting of their keys to replicate this phenomenon. 

The key action on this particular piano isn’t the best you can find, but it offers a step in the right direction for pianists on a budget.

This digital piano has–get this–a whopping 700 tones to choose from, as well as 152 built in songs.

One of the biggest negatives of this keyboard is its lack of polyphony. With such a low polyphony of only 64, this piano would have a hard time handling much more than a beginner pianist that doesn’t use many of the features such as layers or the preset songs.

It doesn’t take long to start using up a lot of polyphony, and it’s always disappointing to hear that signature “drop out” of notes while playing.  Not everyone will use the same amount of polyphony, but having only 64 would really limit and cramp most pianists.

Lastly, you can choose to purchase the optional Casio CS-44 stand for the CDP-240.

Below, please take a moment to view some of the best-selling digital pianos currently on sale at Amazon.

Casio PX-780

Priced at $899, the Privia PX-780 has many more features than the Casio CDP 130.

This keyboard has 250 tones and a much healthier polyphony of 128.  The Privia PX 780 utilizes a sound engine known as AiR (Acoustic and intelligent Resonator).  This allows the keyboard to have much more detailed and realistic sounds. 

Two simulators are built into this piano: the damper resonance simulator and the hammer response simulator.  These work together to create a faithful representation of hammers striking strings and the resonance of the damper pedal, which allows for sympathetic vibrations in other strings.

Like many pianos in the Privia digital piano line, the keys on the PX 780 have a simulated ebony and ivory texture that is meant to make them feel less plastic-like and slippery.  Some players may really like this feature, but I personally found the texture to be distracting and inauthentic. I thought it made the keys feel a little dirty and it brought to mind the key coating on a toy piano.

Most useful for students and teachers, the PX 780 includes something called Duet mode.  This essentially splits the keyboard into identical halves, allowing a student and their teacher to play the same thing at the same time, in the same octave.

Casio Privia PX-870

Because they’re both in the Privia line of pianos, there are a lot of similarities between the PX 780 and the PX 870.  The most obvious is the price. For a hundred dollars more ($999), you can get a few extra features that the cheaper piano doesn’t offer.

Casio PX 860

Depending on how you plan on using the piano, some people might appreciate the higher maximum polyphony of 256 on the PX 870.  If you use a lot of effects, like playing along with a rhythm track or layering a piano sound with strings, you might consider upgrading to a keyboard with a higher maximum polyphony.

This piano uses the same AiR sound source that the PX 780 has.  Some of the PX 870’s more impressive features include added string resonance, lid simulator, and key off simulator.  These settings allow the player to experience all the little details that make a piano sound like a piano. 

The lid of a grand piano has a big effect on the overall sound, and the key off simulator changes the sound of the piano depending on how quickly your fingers leaves the keys.

Casio Celviano AP-460

The Celviano AP 460 is the most expensive digital piano that we’ll look at in this article, priced at $1,499. Although not part of the Privia line of pianos, it still shares a lot of similar features. 

The Celviano also uses the same AiR Sound engine, has the textured ebony and ivory simulated keys, uses an acoustic resonance modeling simulator, and is able to perform in duet mode, as well as splitting and layering.  The only big difference in the functionality of the keyboard is its “Concert Play” feature.  The piano uses actual live recordings of ten songs played by an orchestra. 

The Celviano’s big draw is its sturdy cabinet and a matching bench.  This elegant and classic keyboard looks and feels as much like an upright as it can.  I also think that weighted keys don’t really matter if the keyboard is shaking around on its stand. 

Having a durable and secure cabinet helps make it feel like you’re playing a digital piano and not a light weight synth.

Casio PX-560

Just by looking at its eye-catching colorful finish, it’s easy to tell that the Privia Pro PX 560 isn’t your run of the mill in-cabinet digital piano.  A beautiful-looking stage piano, the PX 560 is packed with sounds and features. 

This stage piano is also quite portable.  Weighing 26 lbs, we certainly will never suggest the PX-560 is light as a feather, but there’s no doubt that if you need to pack it up and take it with you from gig to gig, you’ll be more than capable of doing that with this instrument.

Like the other digital pianos, the PX 560 uses an 88 key scaled hammer action to give it a realistic feel.  It also uses the textured keys that are typical in most Casio keyboards.  With a polyphony of 256, there isn’t much that this piano can’t handle. Players have access to 600 preset tones and the option of creating up to 400 user tones. 

The interface on the PX 560 is a refreshing change from the usual single-function button approach that Casio normally takes.  The 5.3” color touch screen offers an easy and intuitive way to navigate through the keyboard’s functions.

While the PX 560 also utilizes the AiR Sound System to drive its piano sounds, it also uses something called Linear Morphing Technology.  This feature is meant to reduce the sometimes jarring difference when switching between loud and softer sounds.  It provides a smoother transition that is less noticeable.

In addition to its role as a very capable digital piano, the PX 560 also has many characteristics of a synth. Using Casio’s proprietary Hex Layer Synthesis, this keyboard allows users to create their own sounds and instruments by creating up to fourteen layers at a time.  Players can then save their custom made instrument to use again.

Conclusion

What Casio does really well is creating a line of digital pianos that are affordable and accessible to hobbyists, students, and beginners. Depending on whether you’re looking for a digital piano that doubles as an attractive piece of furniture for your living room (Casio Celviano AP 460), or a basic keyboard with enough rhythms and songs to keep a young piano student interested (Privia PX 780), Casio has an option that won’t break the bank.

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You Also Might Enjoy:

  1. What’s Casio Digital Piano is the Best Available?
  2. Casio PX-860 vs Casio PX-850: Which is Better?
  3. Digital Piano Buyers Guide for Beginners
  4. What’s the Best Digital Piano with 88 Weighted Keys?
  5. What’s the Best Digital Piano for the Money?
  6. What’s the Best Sounding Digital Piano?
  7. What Digital Piano Has the Best Key Action?
  8. What’s the Best Digital Pianos for Intermediate Players?
  9. Digital Stage Pianos Under $2,000: Ranking the Best of the Best
  10. Ranking the Top Digital Pianos Under $1,000

Filed Under: Casio Pianos

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Casio Keyboard Buying Guide

Which is the best Casio keyboard for you? It all depends on your needs. We shall take a look at various keyboards and who they’re most suitable for. Several factors come to play when choosing a keyboard. We shall talk about them here.

The keyboard you choose would depend largely on your budget. When buying a keyboard, the more you spend, the better it usually gets. But you should never pay for features you won’t use. There is need for a balance.

Some of the best Casio musical keyboards on the market are the Privia digital piano series. This includes the Casio PX130 for about $499.00, Casio PX-330 for about $699.00, Casio PX-3 for $799.00, and Casio PX830 for $999.95. They can be bought on sale for less. These keyboards all come with 88 touch-response weighted keys like a grand piano. If you’re looking for a keyboard that emulates the feel of an acoustic piano, you should consider getting one of these, and not one of the cheaper light-key models. These are great piano alternatives for advanced players. Also, they will help beginners develop strength in their fingers. If you’re buying a keyboard for a child taking piano lessons, you should give one of these Casio digital pianos a try. If you’re a professional player looking for a digital piano, Casio, like Yamaha has some good options.Casio keyboard

Highly Recommended: Click here for the BEST piano/keyboard course I’ve come across online.

You can also check out the Casio AP series. There’s the Casio AP620 Celviano digital piano for about $1,399.95, Casio AP420 for $1,099.95, and Casio AP220 for $899.95. Before buying anyone of these keyboards you need to know what features you really need.

Are you looking for a Casio keyboard for a beginner or child? There are several cheap keyboards available. They are also great for folks with a low budget. 61 key keyboards like the Casio CTK-2100, CTK-3000 and CTK-4000 are great gifts for a child or beginner. These come with 61 keys and are very basic. It’s a good idea to buy cheaper keyboards like these for kids since you do not know whether they will continue to be interested in playing the keyboard or piano. You don’t want to spend thousands on an instrument, only to have it sitting there if your child loses interest. You can start with cheaper keyboards like the Casio CTK series and move to more expensive models later on.

Another great option for someone learning to play the keyboard is a lighted Casio keyboard. These keyboards actually light up and tell you what notes to play. Learning to play is as easy as following the lights. You can check out keyboards like the Casio LK-230, Casio LK270 and Casio LK100 lighted keyboards. They come with 61 keys. These keyboards cost under $200.

How many keys do you need? If you want a 76 keyboard, you can look into the Casio WK-200 keyboard for about $200.

Looking for the ultimate child mini keyboard? How about the Casio SA-76 44-key keyboard? Yes, only 44 keys. This is a very cheap keyboard selling for less than $50. If you want a keyboard for your kid to play around with but don’t want to spend much, check out a Casio mini keyboard like the SA-76. I would probably buy this keyboard for a child under the age of 5. For an older child I would recommend at least 61 keys.Casio digital piano

Before choosing a Casio keyboard, be sure to read customer reviews. They go a long way in helping you decide what is right for you. These are from customers who have actually bought the keyboard you intend to buy. At the end of the day the ultimate decision is yours. Go here to buy a Casio keyboard of your choice.

Further Reading:

Casio Lighted Keyboard

Keyboard Manual – Casio

Mini Piano Keyboard

Roll Up Piano

Return from Casio Keyboard to Home Page.

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I was trying to play a cheap Casio keyboard along with one of the music channels and couldn't find the key. I seemed to be halfway between two keys, like the keyboard had gone a quarter tone sharp. The keyboard was a CT-650 of unknown age I got free at a yard sale.

So I dug out a couple more, an ancient CTK-650 I've had for decades and a new CTK-700 I bought when I'd moved and had nothing available. (Yes, I have a decent DP I use for practice, I'm just accumulating cheap keyboards with a MIDI out to use for a software organ I want to build)

Anyway, two nearly identical Casio keyboards are in tune with each other and with the cable tv, and the third keyboard is a quarter tone sharp. I tried with and without batteries, swapping power supplies, etc. The one keyboard is always sharp.

Any ideas?



gotta go practice

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Most digital pianos can be adjusted so that A=440Hz or any other value within reason. Sounds like somehow yours got set a few "cents" off.

The keyboard can also be transposed but that happens in full semi-tones so that can't be the problem.

Try a factory reset or setting back to 440


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Googled around a bit, but it looks rather difficult to find a manual for that model online. If you have one, though, tuning or pitch control is definitely what you'd be looking for.


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Go into the tuning function and set it to A=440. I found one in a music store out of tune with the other dp's, and discovered how to tune it - it's intuitive - just poke a few buttons 'till you find it.



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No. Va.

If it's a cheap 61 key Casio, it probably doesn't have a way to adjust the tuning. Some of them might, but a lot do not. You're probably stuck wth it like it is.



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There is no obvious reset or tuning function, but I'll play with it tonight and see if some button combination does something. There is no display of any kind.

I wonder what MIDI puts out? Would that be tuned as well?



gotta go practice

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There is no obvious reset or tuning function, but I'll play with it tonight and see if some button combination does something. There is no display of any kind.

I wonder what MIDI puts out? Would that be tuned as well?


That would be interesting to know. If anything, you could just use it as a MIDI controller but you'd have to adjust the pitch after recording, which seems to be a lot of work for a cheap instrument, when you have others that would do a better job.


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There is no obvious reset or tuning function, but I'll play with it tonight and see if some button combination does something. There is no display of any kind.

I wonder what MIDI puts out? Would that be tuned as well?


That would be interesting to know. If anything, you could just use it as a MIDI controller but you'd have to adjust the pitch after recording, which seems to be a lot of work for a cheap instrument, when you have others that would do a better job.


A cheap keyboard can be a substitute organ manual, feeding MIDI to a software organ emulation. Obviously I need a minimum of three, and one has to be converted to handle input from the pedals. So I watch for them at yard sales, but I'm not willing to pay much.


gotta go practice


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Casio CDP-S350 Digital Piano Demonstration

List of Casio keyboards

SeriesModelYearKeysKey typePreset TonesPolyphony (notes)BatteriesMIDINotesReferencesCasiotone 101 1981 49 full 25 8 - Voices only (no rhythm section). Sustain and vibrato effects only. Four tones of choice can be stored for press-button access. [1]Casiotone 201 1980 49 full 29 8 - Vibrato, sustain effects and tape echo to/from input/output. [2][3]Casiotone 202 1981 49 full 49 8 - Vibrato and sustain effects. [4][5]Casiotone 301 1980 49 full 14 8 - Vibrato effects. [6]Casiotone 401 1981 49 full 14 8 - Vibrato, sustain and hold effects. [7]Casiotone 403 1982 49 full 25 8 - Sustain and vibrato. Mandolin and Music Box sounds repeat at a fixed interval. Four tones of choice can be stored for press-button access. [8][9]Casiotone 405 1983 49 full 20 8 - Vibrato, sustain and reverb. Modulation effects. [10][11]Casiotone 501 1983 49 full 8 AA (x3)* - Sustain and vibrato.

*Batteries only protect memory.

[11][12]Casiotone 601 61 full 20 8 - Sustain and vibrato. 2 additional sound effects triggers. [13]Casiotone 610 1981 61 full 20 8 - Stereo chorus and sustain effects. [14]Casiotone 701 1981 61 full 20 8 - Sustain and vibrato (with options, including vibrato delay). 2 additional sound effects (one is a laser). Had barcode reader accessory to program the on-board sequencer. [15]Casiotone 7000 1983 61 full 20 8 AA (x3)* - Vibrato and sustain effects. Sequencer with 1855 note memory.

*Batteries only protect memory.

[16]CT 102 49 full 6 8 D (x6) Sustain effect only. [17][18]CT 310 1984 49 full 12 8 D (x6) Vibrato, sustain and reverb effects. [19][20]CT 320 1985 49 full 12 [21]CT 350 1986 49 full 12 8 D (x6) - Sustain effect only. [22]CT 360 1987 49 full 12 8 D (x6) - "Songbank" keyboard. No effects or pedal inputs. [23]CT 370 1988 49 full 210 10 D (x6) [24]CT 380 49 full 210 10 D (x6) [25]CT 390 49 full 210 10 D (x6) [26]CT 395 49 full 110 12 AA (x6) [27]CT 400 49 full 100 16 AA (x6) Has 5 sound effect pads. [28]CT 410V 1984 49 full 20 8 D (x6) Has analog filter with cutoff, envelope and resonance controls. Input for BFC-1 Breath Filter Controller which allows control the filters with breath. [29]CT 420 49 full 210 10 D (x6) [30]CT 430 1986 49 full 20 8 D (x6) [31]CT 450 49 full 12 8 D (x6) [32]CT 460 49 full 465 10 D (x6) MIDI Has PCM "Sound Effect" section. Has MIDI in/out only (no thru). Similar to MT-540. [33]CT 470 49 full 220 12 D (x6) MIDI Has "Tone Editor" with detune, delay, attack/decay and release and "Multi-Accompaniment System" [34]CT 510 1987 49 full 12 8 D (x6) [35]CT 605 61 full 20 8 D (x6) [36]CT 607 61 full 20 10 D (x6) [37]CT 620 61 full 20 8 D (x6) [38]CT 625 61 full 210 10 D (x6) [39]CT 630 1987 61 full 30 8 D (x6) MIDI CT 636 61 full 465 10 D (x6) "Auto harmonise" effect. [40]CT 638 61 full 465 CT 640 1988 61 full 465 10 D (x6) in/out/thru Tonebank allows layering of two sounds with reduced polyphony. Can "register" 4 patches for quick access, similar to the earlier Casiotone 101. [41]CT 647 61 full 120 16 D (x6) Two reverb effects and stereo panning. Forty-song "jukebox". [42]CT 648 61 full CT 650 1989 61 full 465 10 D (x6) in/out/thru Tonebank allows layering of two sounds with reduced polyphony. Can "register" 4 patches for quick access, similar to the earlier Casiotone 101. [43]CT 655 61 full 110 12 D (x6) in/out Has "Tone Editor" with detune, delay, attack/decay and release. Has sustain pedal input. Not velocity sensitive. [44]CT 657 61 full 110 12 D (x6) - Has "Tone Editor" with delay, attack/decay and release. [45]CT 660 1990 61 full 465 10 D (x6) in/out/hru Has PCM "Sound Effect" section. Can "register" 4 patches for quick access, similar to the earlier Casiotone 101. [46][47]CT 670 1992 61 full 220 12 D (x6) in/out/thru Has "Tone Editor" with detune, delay, attack/decay and release and "Multi-Accompaniment System". Has pitch-bender and velocity sensitive keyboard. Paula Abdul Demo Song [48][49]CT 680 61 full 220 12 D (x6) in/out/thru Has Digital Reverb and "Tone Editor" with detune, delay, attack/decay and release. [50]CT 700 61 full 100 12 D (x6) in/out Has sustain jack. [51][52]CT 770 61 full 100 12 D (x6) in/out Has Digital Reverb with editable parameters. [53][54]CT 800 32 100 5 SFX pads and plays songs from Casio ROM Packs. CT 805 1986 49 full 12 8 D (x6) - Sustain effect. [55]CT 810 1985 49 Plays songs from Casio ROM Packs. [56]CT 840 49 full 100 8 AA (x6) [57]CT 870 61 full 100 in/out Has portamento, pitch bender, three reverb effects, velocity sensitive keyboard. CT 888 MIDI CT 6000 1985 61 full 20 8 in/out 8 tone effects, pitch bender wheel with full octave range, velocity sensitive keyboard. [58]CT 6500 1986 61 full 48 8 MIDI 3 tone effects, modulation wheel and other features. [59]CTK 50 49 full 100 8 AA (x6) [60]CTK 80 49 CTK 100 49 full 100 8 AA (x6) [61]CTK 120 49 full 100 8 AA (x6) [62]CTK 130 49 full 100 8 AA (x6) [63]CTK 150 49 full 100 16 AA (x6) [64]CTK 200 49 full 100 16 AA (x6) CTK 220L 49 full 100 12 AA (x6) [65]CTK 230 49 full 100 12 AA (x6) [66]CTK 240 49 full 100 12 AA (x6) [67]CTK 330 49 full 100 12 AA (x6) [68]CTK 401 49 full 100 12 AA (x6) [69]CTK 411 49 full 100 12 AA (x6) MIDI [70]CTK 431 49 full 100 12 AA (x6) MIDI [71]CTK 450 61 full 64 16 AA (x6) [72]CTK 451 2001 61 full 100 12 AA (x6) MIDI [73]CTK 471 2001 61 full 100 12 AA (x6) MIDI [74]CTK 480 61 full 100 12 D (x6) [75]CTK 481 2002 61 full 100 12 AA (x6) [76]CTK 485 61 full 100 12 AA (x6) [77]CTK 491 61 full 100 12 AA (x6) MIDI [78]CTK 495 61 full 100 12 AA (x6) [79]CTK 496 2004 61 full 100 12 AA (x6) MIDI [80][81]CTK 500 61 full 120 16 D (x6) [82]CTK 501 61 full 100 12 D (x6) MIDI [83]CTK 511 61 full 100 12 D (x6) MIDI [84]CTK 515 61 full 100 CTK 518 61 full 100 D (x6) MIDI CTK 519 61 full 100 CTK 520L 1996 61 full 100 12 AA (x6) [85][86]CTK 530 61 full 64 24 D (x6) MIDI [87]CTK 531 61 full 100 16 D (x6) MIDI [88]CTK 533 61 full 100 16 D (x6) MIDI [89]CTK 541 61 full 100 16 D (x6) MIDI [90]CTK 550 61 full 100 16 D (x6) [91]CTK 551 61 full 100 16 D (x6) MIDI Contains Pitch Bend. [92]CTK 560L 61 full 100 12 AA (x6) [93]CTK 571 61 full 128 24 D (x6) MIDI [94]CTK 573 61 full 128 24 D (x6) MIDI [95]CTK 591 61 full 255 24 D (x6) MIDI [96]CTK 593 61 full 255 24 D (x6) MIDI [97]CTK 601 61 full 168 24 D (x6) MIDI [98]CTK 611 61 full 168 24 D (x6) MIDI [99]CTK 620L 1997 61 full 137 24 D (x6) MIDI [100]CTK 630 61 full 100 24 D (x6) MIDI Has reverb and velocity sensitive keys. [101]CTK 650 61 full 128 32 D (x6) MIDI Has 10 digital effects. [102]CTK 651 61 full 200 24 D (x6) MIDI [103]CTK 671 61 full 348 32 D (x6) MIDI [104]CTK 680 61 full 128 32 D (x6) MIDI [105]CTK 691 61 full 790 32 D (x6) MIDI [106]CTK 700 61 full 100 12 AA (x6) MIDI [107]CTK 710 61 full 242 32 AA (x6) [108]CTK 720 61 full 242 32 AA (x6) [109]CTK 731 61 full 232 32 D (x6) MIDI [110]CTK 750 1994 61 full 128 32 D (x6) MIDI [111]CTK 800 2004 61 full 510 32 D (x6) [112]CTK 810 2007 61 full 515 32 AA (x6) [113]CTK 811EX 1998 61 full 200 32 D (x6) MIDI [114]CTK 850IN 61 full 600 48 AA (x6) MIDI [115]CTK 860IN 61 full 600 48 [116]CTK 900 61 full 600 32 D (x6) MIDI [117]CTK 1000 61 full 100 MIDI CTK 1100 61 full 100 12 AA (x6) [118]CTK 1150 61 full 100 12 AA (x6) [119]CTK 1200 61 full 100 12 AA (x6) [120]CTK 1300ES 2013 61 12 AA (x6) [121]CTK 1500 61 full 120 32 AA (x6) CTK 1550 61 full 120 32 AA (x6) CTK 2000 61 full 400 48 AA (x6) MIDI [122]CTK 2080 61 full 400 48 AA (x6) MIDI [123]CTK 2090 61 full 400 48 AA (x6) MIDI [124]CTK 2100 61 full 400 48 AA (x6) MIDI [125]CTK 2200 61 full 400 48 AA (x6) MIDI [126]CTK 2300 61 full 400 48 AA (x6) MIDI [127]CTK 2400 61 full 400 48 AA (x6) MIDI [128]CTK 2500 61 full 400 48 AA (x6) MIDI CTK 3000 61 full 400 48 AA (x6) MIDI [129]CTK 3200 61 full 400 48 AA (x6) MIDI [130]CTK 3400SK 61 full 200 48 AA (x6) MIDI [131]CTK 3500 61 full 400 48 AA (x6) MIDI CTK 4000 2008 61 full 570 48 D (x6) MIDI [132][86]CTK 4200 61 full, weighted 600 48 AA (x6) MIDI Has sampling and rhythm editing functions, among others. [133]CTK 4400 61 full 600 48 AA (x6) MIDI [134]CTK 5000 61 full 670 48 D (x6) MIDI [135]CTK 5200 61 full 600 48 AA (x6) MIDI [136]CTK 6000 61 full 670 48 D (x6) MIDI [137]CTK 6200 61 full 700 48 D (x6) MIDI Keyboard two level touch response. Assignable pedal jack. [138]CTK 6300IN 61 full 700 48 D (x6) MIDI [139]CTK 7000 61 full 800 64 D (x6) MIDI [140]CTK 7200 61 full 820 64 D (x6) MIDI [141]CTK 7300IN 61 full 820 64 D (x6) MIDI [142]CT-S 1 2021 61 full 61 64 AA (x6) MIDI Available in red, white or black. [143]CT-S 100 2019 61 full 122 32 AA (x6) MIDI [144]CT-S 200 2019 61 full 400 48 AA (x6) MIDI Available in red, white or black. [145]CT-S 300 2019 61 full 400 48 AA (x6) MIDI Keyboard two level touch response. [146]CT-S 400 2021 61 full 600 48 AA (x6) MIDI Keyboard three level touch response. Assignable pedal jack. [147]CT-X 700 2018 61 full 600 48 AA (x6) MIDI Keyboard three level touch response. Assignable pedal jack. [148]CT-X 800 2018 61 full 600 48 AA (x6) MIDI CT-X 3000 2018 61 full 800 64 D (x6) MIDI CT-X 5000 2018 61 full 800 64 MIDI
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Casio_keyboards

Piano casio keyboard

Casio Musical Instruments

Whilst many may associate Casio for their calculators and as the go-to watch brand for under 15s, they have actually built up an excellent range of pianos and keyboards to suit both beginners and accomplished players.

If you're just starting out, Casio keyboards feature a massive range of sounds and backing tracks to explore, and built-in lessons so that you can learn and progress outside of regular tuition. For more seasoned players, Casio offer a wide variety of authentic-sounding digital home pianos and stage pianos to suit your budget. At the top end of the range, Casio collaborated with acoustic piano designer Bechstein to create their digital hybrid pianos that actually feature the authentic action and feel of a real acoustic piano.

At Andertons, we offer 0% Finance over £300; plus we have some fantastic piano and keyboard bundles so that you can save money when buying a full setup with a stool and headphones.

History of Casio

Casio was established as an electronics company in 1946, by an engineer called Kashio Tadao. It rose to fame originally with its compact calculators, however Casio have created a wide range of different products in their long history including, printers, mobile phones, wristwatches, cameras, computers, as well as a range of musical instruments.

The first instrument came in January 1980 with the Casiotone CT-201. Whilst it wouldn't amaze people with it's realism, it was the first of many Casio keyboards to offer beginners an affordable and fun keyboard option when learning the piano. Their first Synthesizer was released in 1984 with the CZ-101, and unlike those early keyboards, it still holds up well today!

Casio started to build on their piano range with the Celviano full digital piano in 1991, and the stylish and affordable Privia digital pianos launched in 2003. During this time they have continued to build and improve the technology. Their latest technology "A.I.R" sound source recreates the rich, resonating tones of a real acoustic piano. This sound quality and performance is even strong enough to challenge the long-standing dominance of notorious competitors; it's just a matter of personal taste!

Most recently, in 2015 Casio released their Grand Hybrid range, working in collaboration with Bechstein to create a digital piano with a real acoustic piano action. This new hybrid piano gives you all the benefits of digital, like staying in tune and the option of different tones, but you still get the authentic feel and response of a real acoustic piano. It's the ultimate in digital piano design and technology.

Casio Piano/Keyboard Series

Casio offer a number of different options to suit your budget and needs. Here's a rundown of the different ranges.

Privia

Privia is Casio's selection of slimline digital instruments for beginners and intermediates. The Privia range encompasses many of Casio's stage pianos and performance keyboards as well as compact modern instruments for the home. They're perfect for compact living spaces and boast a fantastic range of tones and features.

Celviano

Celviano represents Casio's high-end piano range, featuring a stylish upright piano design, high-quality "A.I.R" sound engine and Tri-sensor Keyboard action for excellent feel and tone.

The Flagship Celviano Grand Hybrid pianos are a step above the rest, with full Bechstein hammer action for the ultimate in authenticity.

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Sours: https://www.andertons.co.uk/brands/casio
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