Trek 1000 sl years

Trek 1000 sl years DEFAULT

stolen 2007 Trek 1000 SL

  • Serial: WTU091C0779A
  • Manufacturer: Trek
  • Model: 1000 SL
  • Year: 2007
  • Primary colors: Orange and Yellow or Gold
  • Frame size: 52CM

Distinguishing features

- 2007 Trek 1000 SL Road Bike. Orange/Yellow Frame with Carbon seat post and fork. Value 600Silver 'Greg Cycle' sticker on bottom of frame. Fat tire badge on handle bar post, damage on rear quick release. damage on frame near from gear. Hole on leather seat. Bell on left handle bar. Shamano black clip petals. Stock Data-Frameset Sizes 52,Frame Alpha SL Aluminum Fork Bontrager Approved, carbon Wheels Wheels Alloy hubs; Alex alloy rims w/eyelets Tires Bontrager Select, 700x25c Drivetrain Shifters Shimano Sora STI, 8 speed Front Derailleur Shimano 2203 Rear Derailleur Shimano Tiagra Crank Bontrager Sport 52/42/30 Cassette SRAM 850 12-26, 8 speed Pedals Alloy/nylon road w/clips and straps Components Saddle Bontrager Race Basic Lux Seat Post Bontrager Carbon Handlebars Bontrager Sport, 26.0mm Stem Bontrager Select, 17 degree Headset Aheadset Slimstak w/semi-cartridge bearings, sealed Brakeset Alloy dual pivot w/Shimano Sora STI levers-

Theft Details

  • Location Seattle, WA 98103
  • Stolen at2012-09-30T01:00:00-0500
  • Police report # 2012-336876
  • Department & city Seattle

Description of incident

Locker/Home Reward: 75

Sours: https://bikeindex.org/bikes/12131

Trek 1000 Review: One of the Great Classic Vintage Bikes?

A right frame can be the strongest and the most reliable – yet very unlikely the better-looking. The Trek 1000, on the other hand, with its lightweight frame, delivered some of the best painting jobs at the time – and even today.

For those who know the Trek 1000, seeing one in the street is immediately a moment of appraisal. The electric blue looked wet with a black splash that increased its appeal, even more so when you add the white decals that gave it a superb touch of excellent taste.

Low-Maintenance Performance

A bike for the long-distance road needs to be of low maintenance almost obligatorily. And that’s precisely what the Trek 1000 provides.

Being able to use the Trek 1000 for hours without problems was maybe the attractive factor most people found on the bike. For the lover of long roads, the Trek 1000 was merely perfect. At mid-end level, there weren’t many bikes as good as the Trek 1000 when it comes to constant use on the road.

Excellent Frame & Fork

Despite a lighter aluminum frame than others – the Alcoa 6061 T6 is still one of the most robust and most reliable out there. Alongside with its Cro-Moly Tange fork, the bike was just fantastic in terms of quality of construction.

Actually, almost no user could complain about the overall build of the bike. Not only was it incredibly light in comparison to others of the same cost-level, but it was also one of the most reliable regarding shock-absorption, suspension, and so on.

Disadvantages of the Trek 1000

Lack of Stability

Even in the shortest of sizes, the Trek 1000 was slightly harder to stabilize than other bikes. This wasn’t merely a problem of danger because the bike is not a mountain bike where stability is essential – but was still a problem, especially for short people.

Riding casually with the bike was the frequent cause for which most users bought this model. However, it was common to find many users having trouble getting control over the bike. After a few rides, however, the bike was one of the easiest & smoothest.

Unusual Shifting

Another disadvantage most users could complain about on the quality of the Trek 1000, was the position of the shifters & their speed of gearing.

Typically, in classic bikes, the shifters are located on the handlebars. However, with the Trek 1000, these shifters were located below, making a little harder for users to shift correctly – especially if the users were already familiar with the traditional style.

But similarly to the lack of stability, the shifters weren’t a problem after a few rides anymore. And of course, very likely many people found this feature positive instead.

Trek 1000 – Full Specs

  • Colors: Electric Blue & Black Splash with White Decals
  • Weight: 23lbs
  • Frame: Alcoa 6061 T6 Aluminum
  • Fork: Tange Cro-Moly with TIG Welded Aero Multi-Crown
  • Headset: Tange Seiki Sealed
  • Sizes: 18.5, 20.5, 21.3, 22, 22.8, 23.6, 24.4
  • Hubs: Shimano Exage EX 32h
  • Rims: Trek/Matrix Titan II700c x 25C
  • Tires: 700 x 25c Trek IsoTech 3
  • Pedals: HTI Alloy Quill
  • Brakeset: Shimano 400 EX SLR Aero Levers
  • Shift Levers: Shimano 400 EX7-Speed SIS Indexing
  • Front Derailleur: Shimano 500 EX 7-speed
  • Rear Derailleur: Shimano 400 EX 7-speed
  • Crankset: Shimano 500 RX, 42/52 teeth – SuperGlide Chainrings
  • Rear Cogs: 7-speed, 12 - 28 teeth
  • Seatpost: SR TCO Sport Alloy
  • Saddle: Trek EnerGel Lycra
  • Handlebar: SR Anatomic Alloy
  • Stem: SR 90’ X-Stem Silver

Is the Trek 1000 Still a Great Classic to Have?

A bike that offers exceptional performance for the on-road lover – the Trek 1000 is almost a perfect bike.

Even if you find a badly-treated Trek 1000, it is more than worth it to get it and restore it. It will give you not only the chance to see how reliable & performance-oriented it is but also the opportunity to enjoy its beautiful design and incredible lightweight construction that no other bike at its same level can offer.

Is the Trek 1000 a classic worth having? Yes. It is one of the greatest classics any enthusiast would love to have. Get it, and you’ll acquire a superb bike without a doubt!

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Sours: https://www.bmxonline.com/trek-1000-review/
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Trek SL 1000

Originally Posted by unbelievablyView Post

The lower ended components will loose there luster.

That's what I would expect but can someone please quantify for me what exactly that means?

I have a 2004 Trek 1000, Sora equipped with no-name brakes. After 15000 kms, I've changed the chain twice, (it's due to be changed again), the cassette once, and the brake pads numerous times. The shifters, the front and rear derailleurs are not complaining. So, other than normal wear, how does Sora lose its lustre?

I had some early issues with the rear wheel popping some spokes through no fault of mine. The LBS changed them out at no charge. The front wheel, having never been tuned, is still true.

For the money, I think that Sora is a great deal. Sure I understand it's not competition calibre, but the bike itself is in the sport/recreation category to begin with.
Sours: https://www.bikeforums.net/
Trek 1.1 Road bike review

road bike trek 1000?

The 8 speed sora groupset is now obsolete, it's been replaced by an updated 9 speed model. It's still OK kit, but the selection of cassettes etc will be more limited as time goes on, and upgrading will be more expensive if you do decide to go to 9 speed.

The trouble with buying new is that you don't get much for your cash. Reasonable road bikes priced below £500 are few and far between. I know this cos I've just been trying to get the missus a good first road bike. The Carrera is much the same spec as the one on the "for Sale" boards here for £90.

Some Halfords kit is OK, just check anything that their mechanics do... some of them are chimps. If you must buy new, then consider the Carrera and have a look at Decathlon; their Sport 1 seems to be OK at that price point too.

In both cases you are going to get a decent road bike. It wont be particularly light, the wheels and components will be bottom of the range and it wont be easy to upgrade.......

Having said that, It will still be perfectly rideable and damn good fun - and much, much easier and faster than any mountain bike (on road anyway).

 

Sours: https://www.cyclechat.net/threads/road-bike-trek-1000.52743/

1000 years trek sl

Trek SL1000 review

[im-gallery view=\"slideshow\" thumbnails=\"portrait\" columns=\"4\" showThumbnails=\"yes\"][im-gallery-image id=\"85826\" title=\"Trek SL1000 review - 85826\"]blank[\/im-gallery-image][im-gallery-image id=\"85832\" title=\"Trek SL1000 review - 85832\"]blank[\/im-gallery-image][\/im-gallery]<\/p>

Half a grand is a lot of money for a lot of people - and luckily it can get you a lot of bike. There's a huge range to choose from at this price, from commuting cycles to long-distance tourers, but if you're looking for something a little lighter and sportier you'll be pleased to know that for around £500 you can buy a machine that'll easily cope with distance rides such as sportives, as well as your day to day cycling, with a good dose of style thrown in.<\/strong><\/p>

The Trek SL1000, was a winner in Cycling Plus' 2006 budget race bikes of the year.
<\/p>

Frame <\/strong>
The Trek frame is based on 7005 series aluminium tubing with butted main tubes and is 1,551g in the 56cm size tested. The welding is plain without any smoothing of the joins, and the paint and decals are an improvement on the previous year's model. We like the neatly executed mudguard bridge detailing between the chainstays. <\/p>

The distinctive and unusual forward-sloping top-tube (it's higher at the seatpost) is an aspect of the 1000-1500 series that you'll either like or loathe, but the short head-tube enables a low riding position for time trialling that simply isn't possible on the Specialized with its taller head-tube. The handlebar height can be altered considerably by flipping the stem through 180 degrees to point upwards, and further adjustments can be effected in small increments by using the headset spacers provided. The inclusion of rack and mudguard eyes is a major plus point as far as versatility for commuting and general cycling is concerned, meaning that this frame is a good all-rounder.<\/p>


Equipment <\/strong>
Given that the £500 price point is largely focused on those who are just getting into their cycling, it is appropriate that Trek have specified the SL1000 with a triple chainset, because the range of gears this provides is more important than the small weight saving of a double chainset. The anatomic 'pistol grip' handlebars have a slightly deeper and lower bend than those of the Specialized, and the radically sloping stem provides a greater than average range of handlebar height settings, though it doesn't win points for style. The Shimano Sora levers work well with your hands rested on the hoods, but it's a long reach to the brake hood button levers when your hands are on the drops.<\/p>


An eight-speed Shimano cassette means the transition to a smaller gear is a noticeably bigger step than with a 10-speed system, but the testers felt that it hardly affected their ability to maintain a constant pedalling cadence on undulating roads.<\/p>



Wheels <\/strong>
The Trek wheels are of the traditional variety in using 32 spokes per wheel, laced in a 3-cross pattern to strong, reputable Alex rims - each spoke is crossed by two others, between hub and rim - with unbranded but smooth-running hubs. This year's wheels are 115g heavier per pair than those of the previous year's model that were outwardly similar but used Rigida Chrina rims instead. Trek have retained the tried and trusted Bontrager Select tyres that are probably the best budget tyre we have come across for vertical compliance, and they grip tenaciously in the wet. Their slightly larger 25mm width means they are more resistant to pinch punctures than 23mm tyres, but they'll need to be changed for a 23mm tyre if mudguards are to be fitted to provide enough clearance.<\/p>


Handling <\/strong><\/p>

The Trek's butted tubes make for a lively performance out on the road and were it not for the weight of the components, this could easily be confused with a bike costing twice the price. There really is very little to criticise when ridden on the flat, but at a shade under 21lb its bulk, which is mainly centred on the wheels, makes it harder for the rider to change tempo on a climb. That said, the fun and lively nature of the ride makes you want to take the long way home on a warm balmy summer evening.<\/p>

Though odd looking, the system of using spacers stacked to give the greatest handlebar height didn't cause our testers any worries, and the time triallists will warm to the fact that the spacers can be omitted completely to get a low, aerodynamic riding position.

Verdict<\/strong><\/p>

The Trek won our budget race bike of 2006 award by virtue of its versatility and now receives a carbon seatpost, but it's 115g heavier overall because of the new wheels. Compared to the previous model year, the Specialized has seen the biggest raft of improvements which, like the Trek, include a carbon seatpost in place of an aluminium one, together with a higher spec and marginally lighter wheels.
Iit's hard to ignore the Trek's inclusion of mudguard and rack eyes. These make the it a very versatile bike, a quality that can't be overlooked if the bike is to be used year-round for different types of riding. If versatility is your bag, the Trek should be right up your street.<\/p>

Half a grand is a lot of money for a lot of people - luckily it can get you a lot of bike

Our rating 
4.5 out of 5 star rating 4.5
GBP £499.00 RRP Skip to view deals

By Paul Vincent

Published:

Our review

Exciting to ride and highly versatile

Skip to view product specifications

Half a grand is a lot of money for a lot of people – and luckily it can get you a lot of bike. There’s a huge range to choose from at this price, from commuting cycles to long-distance tourers, but if you’re looking for something a little lighter and sportier you’ll be pleased to know that for around £500 you can buy a machine that’ll easily cope with distance rides such as sportives, as well as your day to day cycling, with a good dose of style thrown in.

The Trek SL1000, was a winner in Cycling Plus’ 2006 budget race bikes of the year.

Frame
The Trek frame is based on 7005 series aluminium tubing with butted main tubes and is 1,551g in the 56cm size tested. The welding is plain without any smoothing of the joins, and the paint and decals are an improvement on the previous year’s model. We like the neatly executed mudguard bridge detailing between the chainstays.

The distinctive and unusual forward-sloping top-tube (it’s higher at the seatpost) is an aspect of the 1000-1500 series that you’ll either like or loathe, but the short head-tube enables a low riding position for time trialling that simply isn’t possible on the Specialized with its taller head-tube. The handlebar height can be altered considerably by flipping the stem through 180 degrees to point upwards, and further adjustments can be effected in small increments by using the headset spacers provided. The inclusion of rack and mudguard eyes is a major plus point as far as versatility for commuting and general cycling is concerned, meaning that this frame is a good all-rounder.

Equipment
Given that the £500 price point is largely focused on those who are just getting into their cycling, it is appropriate that Trek have specified the SL1000 with a triple chainset, because the range of gears this provides is more important than the small weight saving of a double chainset. The anatomic ‘pistol grip’ handlebars have a slightly deeper and lower bend than those of the Specialized, and the radically sloping stem provides a greater than average range of handlebar height settings, though it doesn’t win points for style. The Shimano Sora levers work well with your hands rested on the hoods, but it’s a long reach to the brake hood button levers when your hands are on the drops.

An eight-speed Shimano cassette means the transition to a smaller gear is a noticeably bigger step than with a 10-speed system, but the testers felt that it hardly affected their ability to maintain a constant pedalling cadence on undulating roads.

Wheels
The Trek wheels are of the traditional variety in using 32 spokes per wheel, laced in a 3-cross pattern to strong, reputable Alex rims – each spoke is crossed by two others, between hub and rim – with unbranded but smooth-running hubs. This year’s wheels are 115g heavier per pair than those of the previous year’s model that were outwardly similar but used Rigida Chrina rims instead. Trek have retained the tried and trusted Bontrager Select tyres that are probably the best budget tyre we have come across for vertical compliance, and they grip tenaciously in the wet. Their slightly larger 25mm width means they are more resistant to pinch punctures than 23mm tyres, but they’ll need to be changed for a 23mm tyre if mudguards are to be fitted to provide enough clearance.

Handling

The Trek’s butted tubes make for a lively performance out on the road and were it not for the weight of the components, this could easily be confused with a bike costing twice the price. There really is very little to criticise when ridden on the flat, but at a shade under 21lb its bulk, which is mainly centred on the wheels, makes it harder for the rider to change tempo on a climb. That said, the fun and lively nature of the ride makes you want to take the long way home on a warm balmy summer evening.

Though odd looking, the system of using spacers stacked to give the greatest handlebar height didn’t cause our testers any worries, and the time triallists will warm to the fact that the spacers can be omitted completely to get a low, aerodynamic riding position.

Verdict

The Trek won our budget race bike of 2006 award by virtue of its versatility and now receives a carbon seatpost, but it’s 115g heavier overall because of the new wheels. Compared to the previous model year, the Specialized has seen the biggest raft of improvements which, like the Trek, include a carbon seatpost in place of an aluminium one, together with a higher spec and marginally lighter wheels.
Iit’s hard to ignore the Trek’s inclusion of mudguard and rack eyes. These make the it a very versatile bike, a quality that can’t be overlooked if the bike is to be used year-round for different types of riding. If versatility is your bag, the Trek should be right up your street.

Product Specifications

Product

Bottom BracketLP20
ShiftersTiagra
Front Tyre Size700x23C
Front TyreSelect
Available Sizes43cm 50cm 52cm 54cm 56cm 58cm 60 cm 63cm
Standover Height (cm)80
Seat Tube (cm)52.5
Chainstays (cm)41.5
Bottom Bracket Height (cm)28.2
Weight (kg)9.48
Trail6.2
StemSelect
SeatpostCarbon
CassetteShimano Tiagra 8
RimsAT450
Rear Wheel Weight1800
Rear DerailleurTiagra
Headset TypeSemi-Integrated
HandlebarSport
Front Wheel Weight1300
Front DerailleurTiagra
Frame Weight1551
Frame Material7005 Aluminium
Fork Weight520
Fork Offset4.3
Rear Tyre Size700x23C

Authors

Sours: https://www.bikeradar.com/reviews/bikes/road-bikes/trek-sl1000-review/
Bike Trek 1000 - Up grade para bike Feminina

Trek Bicycle Corporation

American bicycle manufacturing company

2018 Trek logo word mark wiki buffer.svg
TypePrivate company
IndustryBicycles
Founded1975; 46 years ago (1975)
Headquarters

Waterloo, Wisconsin

,

USA

Key people

John Burke, President
ProductsBicycles and related components
RevenueUS$900 million (est.) (2013)[1]

Number of employees

1,800[1]
ParentIntrepid Corporation
Subsidiaries

List

    • Trek India
    • Fahrradhandel Gesellschaft GmbH& (Austria)
    • Bikeurope BV (Netherlands)
    • Trek Denmark
    • Trek Bicycle GmbH (Germany)
    • Trek Japan
    • Bike USA S.L. (Spain)
    • Trek Fahrrad AG (Switzerland)
    • Trek UK
    • Trek Korea
    • Electra Bicycle Company
Websitetrekbikes.com

Trek Bicycle Corporation is a bicycle and cycling product manufacturer and distributor under brand names Trek, Electra Bicycle Company, Bontrager, and Diamant Bikes. The company has previously manufactured bikes under the Gary Fisher, LeMond Racing Cycles, Klein, and Villiger Bikes brand names. With its headquarters in Waterloo, Wisconsin, Trek bicycles are marketed through 1,700 independently owned bicycle shops across North America, subsidiaries in Europe, Asia, South Africa, as well as distributors in 90 countries worldwide. Most Trek bicycles are manufactured outside the United States, in countries including the Netherlands, Germany, Taiwan and China.[2]

History[edit]

1975–1979 — The early years[edit]

In December, 1975, Dick Burke and Bevil Hogg established Trek Bicycle as a wholly owned subsidiary of Roth Corporation, a Milwaukee-based appliance distributor. In early 1976, with a payroll of five, Trek started manufacturing steel touring frames in Waterloo, Wisconsin, taking aim at the mid to high-end market dominated by Japanese and Italian made models. Trek built nearly 900 custom hand-brazed framesets that first year, each selling for just under $200. Later that same year Trek Bicycle was incorporated. In 1977, Penn Cycle in Richfield, Minnesota became the first Trek retailer in the world. Within three years, Trek sales approached $2,000,000.

1980–1984 — Trek becomes a business[edit]

Hampered without additional manufacturing capacity, Trek sales plateaued in the late 1970s. In just a few years Trek had outgrown its original "red barn" manufacturing facility—a former carpet warehouse. Recognizing the need for expansion, in 1980 Trek broke ground on a new 26,000 sq ft (2,400 m2) corporate headquarters on the outskirts of Waterloo[citation needed]. Company co-founder Dick Burke would later recall that "it wasn’t until we built the new factory that we became a business." With more factory space available, Trek expanded its manufacturing to include complete bikes. In 1981, Trek entered the steel road racing bike market, introducing the "Pro" line, including the 750 and 950 models, and in 1983, Trek built its first mountain bike, the 850. In 1984, Trek ventured into the aftermarket parts and accessories business, launching its Trek Components Group (TCG) department.

1985–1991 — Technology frontier[edit]

In 1985, borrowing technology from the aerospace industry, (and bike companies such as Alan and Vitus), Trek introduced its first bonded aluminum bike frame, the 2000[citation needed]. The introduction of bonded aluminum to Trek's production line proved very problematic for a company that had built itself on hand-brazed steel frames. Manufacturing ground to a halt as Trek worked to figure out how to build bonded frames in a production environment. A year later, Trek followed up the success of the 2000 with a 3-tube carbon composite model, the 2500. Thus began Trek's foray into carbon fiber. That same year, to keep up with rapidly growing sales, Trek added another 75,000 sq ft (7,000 m2) of manufacturing space to its Waterloo headquarters. In 1988, Trek introduced "Trek Wear," marking the company's entry into the cycling apparel business. A year later, Trek expanded into foreign markets, opening subsidiary offices in the UK and in Germany. That same year, Trek introduced its Jazz brand of bicycles, a collection of entry-level and kids’ bikes designed by Trek but manufactured in Taiwan. Jazz bicycles were discontinued in 1993.

1989 was a pivotal year for Trek, marking the year that the company unveiled its first molded carbon fiber frame, the Trek 5000. The 5000 frameset (monocoque carbon frame plus bonded aluminum fork) had an advertised weight of 3.3 lb (1.5 kg). Designed by Trek but built by Brent Trimble, an outside manufacturer, the 5000 suffered enough quality problems that it was discontinued after just one year. But the lessons learned from the 5000 would prove to be instrumental in driving Trek to develop its own carbon manufacturing capabilities in the coming years.

In 1990, Trek developed a new category of bicycle that combined the comfort features of a mountain bike with the quick ride of a road bike: MultiTracks, Trek's first line of hybrid bikes, were born. That same year, Trek also introduced its first line of kids’ bikes. In 1991, Trek opened its first company-owned retail store in nearby Madison, Wisconsin. In addition to showcasing a full line of Trek products, the Trek Store served as a hands-on sales training center for employees from Trek's headquarters who lacked retail experience. The store also provided an outlet for Trek to test merchandising and marketing ideas before expanding them to its network of independent bicycle retailers.

1992–1996 — OCLV and acquisitions[edit]

In the early 1990s, Trek's director of technology, Bob Read, attended an aerospace industry trade show in Salt Lake City, Utah, eventually meeting up with a closed mold tooling company called Radius Engineering. That visit convinced Read that Trek's future success depended on building frames from carbon fiber, a material he envisioned could be used to make light, strong frames. Having lived through the troubled introduction of the 5000, Trek invested heavily in in-house carbon fiber manufacturing capabilities. In 1992, Trek unveiled its first home-grown, full-carbon framed bicycles, the 5500 and 5200, featuring OCLV Carbon frames. OCLV stands for "Optimum Compaction, Low Void" and refers to Trek's proprietary process for creating carbon structures that exceed aerospace standards. Weighing only 2.44 lb (1.11 kg), the 5500 frame was the world's lightest production road frame. To make room for its new OCLV manufacturing facility, Trek expanded its Waterloo headquarters again to a total of 140,000 sq ft (13,000 m2). 1992 marked another first for Trek: its first full suspension mountain bike, the 9000-series, which featured Trek's T3C (travel is three times compression) suspension system.

In 1993, Trek introduced its first OCLV Carbon mountain bike frames, the 9800 and the 9900, which at 2.84 lb (1.29 kg) was the world's lightest production mountain bike frame.

In 1993, Trek also acquired Gary Fisher Mountain Bikes, named after Gary Fisher, one of the inventors of the mountain bike and one of the most popular names in off-road cycling. Fisher had founded Gary Fisher Mountain Bikes in 1983 and sold his company in 1991 to Taiwan's Anlen company, remaining on as President. In 1992, Howie Cohen, who had previously imported Nishiki, Azuki and Kuwahara bicycles, assisted Gary Fisher with his brand[3] — 18 months later brokering the acquisition of Fisher by Trek (in 1993).[3]

In 1994, Trek entered the growing home fitness arena, introducing Trek Fitness Exercycles. In 1996, Trek discontinued the Exercycle line, spinning off its fitness division into an independently-owned company, renamed Vision Fitness.

In 1995, Trek introduced its full suspension Y bike, a departure from traditional bike design. The Y bike sold well, and won an "Outstanding Design and Engineering Award" from Popular Mechanics magazine. Also in 1995, Trek made a number of business moves in order to diversify its product offering and gain market share, acquiring Klein Bicycles, a Chehalis, WA, manufacturer of premium aluminum-framed bicycles, as well as Bontrager Cycles, a Santa Cruz, CA-based manufacturer of bicycle components and hand-built steel frames. Trek also signed a long-term licensing agreement with Greg LeMond, the 3-time Tour de France champion and the first American to win the Tour—to design, build, and distribute LeMond Racing Cycles. 1995 was also the year Trek opened a state-of-the-art assembly facility in Whitewater, Wisconsin, leaving the Waterloo location free to focus solely on frame production[citation needed].

1997–2005 — The Armstrong years and further expansion[edit]

A steel framed 2002 Trek 800 Sport mountain bike
A aluminum framed, 2012 Trek 1.1 Road Bike
A carbon fiber Y-foil from the late 1990s

In 1997, Trek helped sign former world road race champion (1993) Lance Armstrong to the Trek-sponsored United States Postal Service Pro Cycling Team. Armstrong won his first Tour de France in 1999 aboard a Trek 5500, becoming the first American to win the Tour on an American team riding an American made bicycle. Armstrong went on to win a record-setting seven-consecutive Tours de France, all of them aboard Trek bicycles aside from a few early time trial stages that he rode aboard a Litespeed bike, painted and badged as a Trek. In 2012, all of Armstrong's Tour victories were rescinded after Armstrong was found to have violated anti-doping regulations.[4]

In 1998, Trek established its Advanced Concepts Group (ACG), a collection of engineers and technicians dedicated to technologies development. The leading edge of Trek's design and engineering efforts, ACG is perhaps best known for a number of products introduced and used by Lance Armstrong during his historic Tour de France wins, including the original Trek Madone (2003)—named for the Col de la Madone, a 12K climb that starts in the French town of Menton and used by Armstrong to test his fitness—and TTX time trial bike (2005). That same year, Trek opened its first European manufacturing facility, a frame and wheel assembly plant in Carlow, Ireland. The Carlow facility stayed open until late 2004, at which time Trek transferred its European production to a manufacturing facility in Hartmannsdorf, Germany.

Responding to the unique needs of female cyclists, in 2000 Trek introduced Women's Specific Design (WSD) bicycle and accessories. WSD products are designed to fit female riders, and feature sizing and proportions appropriate for women. In October 2001, Trek introduced a custom bike program named Project One, which gave customers the opportunity to customize their Trek bike by selecting the bike's paint scheme and component mix.

Hoping to expand into a new market segment, Trek introduced Trek Travel in December 2002, a provider of luxury cycling vacations in Europe and North America. Trek Travel operated as a wholly owned subsidiary of Trek Bicycle until January 2007, when Trek spun off its interests in the company. Despite the split, Trek and Trek Travel enjoy a close working relationship.

In 2003, Trek acquired Villiger, a Swiss bicycle company, and Diamant, the oldest bicycle company in Germany. The acquisition gave Trek a foothold in the active-leisure bicycle market, an important segment in Europe. As part of the acquisition, Trek took over ownership of the Villiger-Diamant production facility in Hartmannsdorf, Germany. Trek's global expansion continued in 2005, when Trek expanded into the Chinese market by opening two stores in Beijing and signing deals with 20 Chinese distributors.

For the third time in its history, in 2005 Trek again expanded its worldwide headquarters in Waterloo, adding another 43,000 sq ft (4,000 m2) to house its burgeoning engineering, R&D, and marketing departments. As part of the expansion, Trek included an atrium exhibit to display a number of historically significant bikes from Trek's family of brands, including one of the first mountain bikes ever built by Gary Fisher, and seven bikes used by Lance during his historic Tour de France run (one from each year, 1999–2005).

2006–present[edit]

Lance Armstrong on November 11, 2008 at an informal time trial near New Braunfels, Texas

In 2008, after years of behind-the-scenes support for the League of American Bicyclists and the Bikes Belong Coalition (now PeopleForBikes[5]), Trek announced its 1 World 2 Wheels bicycle advocacy campaign at its annual Trek World dealer convention in Madison, Wisconsin. Central to 1 World 2 Wheels is its "Go By Bike" initiative, which urges Americans to ride their bikes instead of drive their cars for trips of two miles (3 km) or less. Through 1 World 2 Wheels Trek also pledged $1,000,000 to help fund the League of American Bicyclists’ "Bicycle Friendly Community" program and committed $600,000 to the International Mountain Bicycling Association's (IMBA) Trail Solutions Services. On January 6, 2014, Trek announced the acquisition of the Electra Bicycle Company.[6]

In 2009, Trek created the Trek Women Triathlon Series.[7] 2011, Trek sponsored three women's triathlon series; the Trek Women Triathlon Series, the Danskin Series and the Iron Girl Series.[8]

As from the 2014 season, Trek became the main sponsor of Pro Tour cycling team Trek Factory Racing, a continuation of its bike sponsorship of Team RadioShack and co-sponsorship of Team Leopard-Trek.

In 2017, Trek paid equal prize money to the male and female winners of the Cyclocross World Cup race hosted at their headquarters in Waterloo, Wisconsin, which was, "the first time in the history of the sport that women would be paid as much as men for racing the same course at the World Cup level."[9]

In 2021, Trek announced the release of its professional level Madone.[10]

2014 unified hour record[edit]

In 2014, the UCI unified the two classifications into a single classification in line with regulations for current track pursuit bikes. Following the change in the rules, German Jens Voigt became the first rider to attempt the hour record, on 18 September 2014 at the Velodrome Suisse, Grenchen, Switzerland on a Trek bicycle.[11][12] He set a new record of 51.110 km, beating the previous record set by Sosenka by 1.410 km.[13]

In the Media[edit]

Trek Y series bikes were used in the hit TV series Pacific Blue and outfitted with Spinergy wheels, NiteRider lights and Janned police bags making each bicycle worth $5,000.

Products[edit]

Eco-friendly products[edit]

For the year 2010, Trek teamed with multiple suppliers to provide eco-friendly products. This includes brand new bikes that are economically priced and are made out of steel. Steel is an easier material to obtain and recycle. Also, Trek is starting to provide bike shops with funds to start recycling old tubes to be sent to Alchemy Goods in Seattle, Washington, to be made into bags, seat bags, and panniers.

Bontrager[edit]

Bontrager branded products include helmets, tires, wheels, handlebars, stems, seatposts, saddles, electronics and cycling shoes, water bottles and other cycling clothing and accessories

LeMond brand[edit]

The relationship between Trek and Tour-de-France winner Greg LeMond went back to at least 1995 when LeMond licensed Trek to produce LeMond branded bicycles. According to Trek, "In 1999, the LeMond line was one of the fastest growing road bike brands and one of the top five largest road bike brands in the United States".[14]

In March 2008, LeMond Cycling Inc prepared a suit against Trek, accusing it of bowing to pressure from "third parties" to "wind down" his brand through lack of distribution and promotion, especially in the European market. The complaint also says that "Since 2001, Trek has systematically sought to silence Mr. LeMond's right to make comments that constitute an informed and honest opinion on matters of legitimate public interest – the problems associated with the use of performance enhancing substances". The complaint includes examples of Trek threatening its ties with LeMond in 2001 and 2004 after he made public statements against doping, Michele Ferrari, and Lance Armstrong[15][16]

Trek responded in April 2008 by suing to sever business ties with LeMond.[14][16] Trek's press release said that "LeMond's suit was characterized by Burke as containing false and irresponsible allegations". Burke also said "for years, Greg LeMond has done and said things that have damaged the LeMond brand and the Trek brand as a whole". . . . "His actions are inconsistent with our values—values we believe in and live everyday. And after years of trying to make it work, we are done."[14] The suit was settled out of court in 2010.[17] As of 2021 LeMond remains the only American Tour de France champion and was eventually awarded a congressional gold medal for his career long commitment to cycling.[18]

Brands[edit]

The Trek Bicycle Corporation consists of several brands:

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ abGlauber, Bill (2 August 2014). "In the middle of political firestorm, Trek Bicycle rolls on". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.
  2. ^Umhoefer, Dave (28 July 2014). "Scott Walker says Trek makes 99% of its bicycles overseas". PolitiFact. Retrieved 4 August 2017.
  3. ^ ab"Early BMX Pioneers". American Bicycle Association BMX. Archived from the original on 2008-08-16.[1]
  4. ^"After a two-year hiatus, Litespeed's TT bike is back and looks sharper than ever". VeloNews.com. 2009-03-13. Retrieved 2020-02-10.
  5. ^"PeopleForBikes". PeopleForBikes. Retrieved 2021-08-20.
  6. ^"Trek announces acquisition of Electra". Bicycle Retailer and Industry News. Retrieved 2020-02-10.
  7. ^"2009 Trek Women's Triathlon Series information". www.trifind.net. Retrieved 2017-12-27.
  8. ^"Women's Triathlon Series Follow Trend in Women's Participation | Triathlete.com". Triathlete.com. 2011-01-28. Retrieved 2017-12-27.
  9. ^Quinlan, Anna. "The Incredible Way 1 Company Is Giving Female Athletes the Credit They Deserve". POPSUGAR Fitness. Retrieved 2017-12-27.
  10. ^Curmei, Cristian (12 January 2021). "Less is More with the Ridiculously Priced Madone SLR-9 Road Bike from Trek". autoevolution.
  11. ^Giles Richards. "The Agenda: Jens Voigt aims to break one of cycling's toughest records — Sport — The Observer". The Guardian. Retrieved 18 September 2014.
  12. ^"Answered: 11 questions about Jens Voigt's hour record attempt — VeloNews.com". VeloNews.com. Retrieved 18 September 2014.
  13. ^Clemitson, Suze (19 September 2014). "Why Jens Voigt and a new group of cyclists want to break the Hour record". =The Guardian. Retrieved 19 September 2014.
  14. ^ abcTREK TO IMMEDIATELY SEVER RELATIONSHIP WITH GREG LEMONDArchived 2012-06-09 at the Wayback Machine, Media Release, trekbikes.com, 2008 4 8, retr 2012 10 13.
  15. ^Complaint, LeMond Cycling Inc, vs Trek Bicycle CorporationArchived 2008-05-16 at the Wayback Machine, 2008 3 20, retr 2012 10 13. from trekbikes.com.
  16. ^ abTrek announces an end to deal with Greg LeMond, Steve Frothingham, Velo News, Published Apr. 8, 2008, Updated Apr. 9, 2008, retrieved 2012 10 13
  17. ^Steve Frothingham (Feb 1, 2010). "Trek/LeMond lawsuit settled". VeloNews. Retrieved 2012-10-13.
  18. ^"road back for Greg LeMond could include Congressional Gold Medal". Minneapolis Star Tribune Tony Brown. 3 October 2019.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trek_Bicycle_Corporation

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