Fitness usmc mil

Fitness usmc mil DEFAULT

Combat Fitness Test

For the US Army test, see Army Combat Fitness Test.

The Combat Fitness Test (CFT) is a semi-annual physical fitness test of the United States Marine Corps. The purpose of the CFT is to assess a Marine’s physical capacity in a broad spectrum of combat related tasks. The CFT was specifically designed to evaluate strength, stamina, agility, and coordination as well as overall anaerobic capacity. The CFT is a complement to the USMC Physical Fitness Test and measures the functional elements of combat fitness through execution of a series of events that represent every Marine’s combat experience, emphasizing the ethos of “every Marine is a rifleman.”[1] All active duty and reserve Marines are required to conduct the Combat Fitness Test every year between the dates 1st July to 1st January. The test is designed to test each Marine's ability to perform in a high-intensity setting. The British Army formerly used a test of the same name which is currently known as the Annual Fitness Test.

United States Marine Corps[edit]

U.S. Marine holding two 30-pound ammunition cans on his shoulders during part of the combat fitness test at Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan, on June 17, 2009.

In the Marine Corps, the Combat Fitness Test has three events:[2]

  • an 880-yard "Movement to Contact" run in boots and utility pants
  • two minutes of lifting a 30-pound ammo can over the head, earning 1–2 points for each number done in the time limit
  • the “Maneuver Under Fire” drill is part obstacle course, part conditioning, and part combat test:
    • 10-yard sprint
    • 15-yard crawl (low then high crawl)
    • hauling a simulated casualty using two different carries: drag and fireman's carry over 75 yards zigzagging through cones
    • sprint while carrying two 30-pound ammo cans over 75 yards through the same cones
    • throwing a dummy hand grenade into a marked circle 22.5 yards away (adding 5 seconds to total time if missed, and subtracting 5 seconds if hit)
    • 5 pushups and a sprint with the ammo cans to the finish line.
Major General Vaughn Ary, Staff Judge Advocate to the Commandant displays lifting 30 lb ammo can 100 times during combat fitness test on December 4, 2011

This test was implemented in mid-2008 by Commandant of the Marine CorpsJames T. Conway as a more combat oriented version of, but supplement to, the Physical Fitness Test.

Scoring[edit]

Ambox current red.svg

This section needs to be updated. The reason given is: Scoring for males is not provided for maneuver under fire. Please help update this article to reflect recent events or newly available information.(July 2020)

Marine Corps CFTs are scored the following way for males (age 17-26):[3]

Movement to contact

A perfect score of 100 is earned by completing this task in under 2 minutes and 45 seconds. One point is deducted for each additional 2 seconds up to a final time of 4 minutes and 13 seconds.

Ammo lift

A perfect score of 100 is achieved with 91 ammo can lifts. Points are deducted as follows:

  • 100 pts for 113-115 lifts
  • 98 pts for 88 lifts
  • 97 pts for 87-86 lifts
  • 96 pts for 85 lifts
  • 95 pts for 84 lifts

Then the cycle begins again (roughly it is -5 pts for every 7 lifts less than 91 lifts, down to 33 lifts).

Marine Corps CFTs are scored the following way for females (age 17-26):

Movement to contact

A perfect score of 100 is earned by completing this task in under 3 minutes and 23 seconds. One point is deducted for each additional 2 seconds up to a final time of 5 minutes and 27 seconds (5.27).

Ammo lift

A perfect score of 100 is achieved with 91 ammo can lifts. Deducting points for this event is fairly straightforward: every lift less than 60 subtracts 1 point (except for lifts 52, 53, 38, 39, 23, and 24 which only subtract 1/2 a point).

Maneuver under fire

A perfect score of 100 is earned by completing this task in under 3 minutes and 1 seconds (3.01). One point is deducted for each additional 2 seconds up to the longest time of 5 minutes and 59 seconds (5.59).

References[edit]

External links[edit]

See also[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Combat_Fitness_Test

Transition Readiness Program

We want to hear from you! Submit feedback about your MCCS experience.

Announcements

For the most up to date information on facility closures / program changes and updates, visit mccscp.com/impact.
Overview:

The Transition Readiness Program (TRP) ensures that Marines are prepared for their transition from military to civilian life and provides Marines and their families with the tools and resources needed to pursue the Department of Defense directed Career Readiness Standards.

Transition 365 is Here! Are you ready for Change?
TRS is currently a week-long program required by Title 10 for all Active Duty and Reserve Marines who have served a minimum of 180 consecutive days on Active Duty. Currently, Marines are encouraged to begin TRS within 12-14 months of their EAS or within 24 months of their retirement, but no later than 180 days from EAS or Retirement (per MCO 1700.31).

USMC Transition Process Changes as of October 1, 2019, the process will include:
The updated transition process will be more tailored to post-separation goals, and Marines will be required to start the process earlier to develop a smoother transition to civilian life.

Initial Counseling requirement – No later than 365 days from EAS
Updated required training during TRS – No later than 180 days from EAS

Workshops / Classes

Sours: https://www.mccscp.com/transition
  1. Caterpillar colouring sheet
  2. Scorpio prom dress
  3. Funny quotes pictures tumblr

Marines voice their opinions on how to improve their service’s physical fitness programs

An officer candidate lifts an ammo can during a combat fitness test at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Va., July 16, 2019.

An officer candidate lifts an ammo can during a combat fitness test at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Va., July 16, 2019. (Phuchung Nguyen/ U.S. Marine Corps)

An officer candidate lifts an ammo can during a combat fitness test at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Va., July 16, 2019.

An officer candidate lifts an ammo can during a combat fitness test at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Va., July 16, 2019. (Phuchung Nguyen/ U.S. Marine Corps)

Marines perform planks during physical training at Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan, July 26, 2019.

Marines perform planks during physical training at Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan, July 26, 2019. (Lauren Brune/ U.S. Marine Corps)

The Marine Corps Force Fitness Division has been asking Marines and the civilians who work with them for ideas on how to improve the Corps’ physical fitness programs.

Earlier this month, the Marine Corps’ Fitness Operational Advisory Group released a survey looking for input on improving the Physical Fitness Test, Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, the Force Fitness Instructor Program, Civilian Certified Athletic Trainers in the Operating Forces, Marine Corps Water Survival Training Program and military occupational specialty specific physical standards.

The survey, which ends Saturday and can be found at www.fitness.marines.mil, has approximately 28 questions, depending on which program the respondent chooses to address. Questions are tailored according to demographics, and documentation can be uploaded to support the survey-taker’s ideas.

“We believe the unfiltered input directly from individual Marines is of the utmost value,” Col. Stephen Armes, director of Marine Corps Force Fitness Division and Training and Education Command, told Stars and Stripes via email Thursday.

“We have already received hundreds of responses addressing multiple facets of the [physical fitness program]."

The group’s primary role is to approve recommended solutions to increase the overall fitness and readiness of Marines, Armes said.

Through the survey, Marines have an opportunity to give ideas about all areas of the physical fitness programs within the service and voice their opinions on topics such as enhancing education on performance nutrition, the use of new technology in workouts and how to better recover afterward.

“I think incorporating a deadlift event like how the Army is doing their test might be something interesting to try because in an actual combat operations scenario, you might have to be carrying something or someone heavy,” Cpl. Gaven Tippett, a motor transport operator with Combat Logistics Battalion 4 on Okinawa, told Stars and Stripes on Friday.

Individuals taking this year’s survey can submit more than one idea about the various programs, and those submissions will then be presented to the Marine Corps Combat Development Command’s commanding general for recommended upgrades to the programs.

“We officially solicit ideas for the [Fitness Operational Advisory Group] annually, but the Force Fitness Division takes into account feedback gathered throughout the year by way of site visits, road show briefs, daily phone calls fielded from the Corps … and inputs set to our organizational inbox,” Armes said.

A recent change has been implemented to the service’s Physical Fitness Test core exercise event as a result of research and feedback.

“One example is the inclusion of the plank as an alternative to the crunch on the Physical Fitness Test,” Armes said. “This was an output from the FOAG last year that led to Force Fitness Division conducting research of the plank. The research gathered led to the Commandant of the Marine Corps decision to include the plank as an alternative to the crunch for the 2020 PFT season.”

“I don’t think that the incorporation of planks is a bad idea,” Tippett said. “Because most people naturally roll over to the front of their bodies to lift themselves up from the ground, so it’s a good way to test and work out the core, compared to sit-ups.”

Once a recommendation has been decided upon for an improvement to the physical fitness programs, a change can take between six to 10 months, Armes said.

“Physical fitness affects every Marine, and as such, each individual Marine’s input is viewed equally,” he said. “The FOAG is only as good as the recommendations we receive. We greatly appreciate the support and the time taken to provide these inputs.”

[email protected] Twitter: @StripesCarlos

Subscribe to Stars and Stripes

Just 99c a week!Subscribe

Sours: https://www.stripes.com/theaters/us/marines-voice-their-opinions-on-how-to-improve-their-service-s-physical-fitness-programs-1.596567
STRONGEST Soldier in Army Gym - Diamond Ott - Muscle Madness

Combat Fitness Test

The Marine Corps Combat Fitness Test, or CFT, measures functional fitness and simulates the demands of battle in full combat utility uniforms. The three parts of the CFT are Movement to Contact, Ammunition Lift, and Maneuver Under Fire. The Movement to Contact drill is an 880-yard sprint that mimics the stresses of running under pressure in battle. In the Ammunition Lift, Marines must lift a 30-pound ammunition can overhead until elbows lock out. The goal is to lift the can as many times as possible in a set amount of time. The Maneuver Under Fire is a 300-yard course that combines a variety of battle-related challenges, including crawls, ammunition resupply, grenade throwing, agility running, and the dragging and carrying of another Marine.

The Combat Fitness Test ensures Marines are at all times ready for the physical rigors of combat operations. Individual readiness is measured by performing a series of combat-related tasks, including:

• Movement to Contact

• Ammunition Can Lifts

• Maneuver Under Fire

Sours: https://www.marines.com/become-a-marine/requirements/physical-fitness.html

Mil fitness usmc

Marine Corps Physical Fitness

through == content == ABOVE THIS LINE except BREADCRUMBS-->

Effective January 1, 2019 the Marine Corps will implement changes to the Physical Fitness Test (PFT) and Combat Fitness Test (CFT). To read more about these changes click here.

When asked what your son or daughter is doing these days, you may have noticed a very impressed reaction when you tell whomever asked that he/she is a United States Marine. Undoubtedly, this is due to the illustrious history of the Corps, the rigorous 13-week boot camp, and the expectation that the Marines are in optimal shape. But what is the Marine Corps' secret to this standard of excellence? It has to do with the emphasis that individual Marines, as well as the Corps as a whole, place on physical conditioning.

Physical fitness standards are implemented as soon as recruits arrive at boot camp, where they are faced with an Initial Strengths Test (IST). The minimum expectations are as follows:

Male:

  • 2 Pull Ups
  • 35 Sit Ups (2 Minutes)
  • 1.5 Mile Run - 13 1/2 minutes

Female:

  • Flexed Arm Hang - 12 Seconds
  • 35 Sit Ups (2 Minutes)
  • 1.5 Mile Run - 15 minutes

From this point on, Marines are expected to improve upon their scores, as the physical fitness standards will only increase. At the end of boot camp, and annually throughout a Marine's career, he or she will take Physical Fitness Tests (PFTs). These tests are scored by a point system, with 300 being the highest score a Marine can earn on his or her PFT. To achieve a maximum score, a Marine must accomplish the following:

Male:

  • 23 Pull Ups
  • 115 Crunches (2 Minutes)
  • 3 Mile Run - 18 minutes

Female:

  • 10 Pull Ups
  • 110 Crunches (2 Minutes)
  • 3 Mile Run - 21 minutes

All Marines have the option of doing push-ups instead of pull-ups. However, by opting to do push-ups Marines will not be able to score the maximum 100 points on that portion. A maximum of 70 points can be scored by choosing to do push-ups.

The requirements for maximum scores vary by age group for both male and female Marines. Please refer to Marine Corps Bulletin 6100 for the requirements for each age group.

Marines 46 years of age and older have the option to select a 5km rowing event instead of the 3 mile run. Males must complete the event in 20:40 for the max score, and females in 23:30 for the max score.

Information from Marines.mil

The combat fitness test (CFT) is just as important for Marines as the physical fitness test is. However, they are different in the way the situations they are mimicking. Combat fitness is designed to measure a Marine's fitness as it relates to actual combat situations. To achieve a maximum score, a Marine must accomplish the following:

Male:

  • 2:38 on the Movement to Contact
  • 120 Ammo Can Lifts
  • 2:04 on the Maneuver Under Fire

Female:

  • 3:10 on the Movement to Contact
  • 75 Ammo Can Lifts
  • 2:42 on the Maneuver Under Fire

Again, the requirements for maximum scores vary by age group for both male and female Marines. Please refer to Marine Corps Bulletin 6100 for the requirements for each age group.

Marines are provided adequate time to maintain or achieve these levels of fitness throughout their time at the School of Infantry (SOI) and their fleet unit. Marines are not only provided with time to meet these physical standards, but are also expected to meet these standards. Typically, during the week, Marines will wake up between 4:00 and 6:00 A.M. and report to either their squad, unit, platoon, or, occasionally, their battalion, for morning Physical Training (PT). Morning PT can consist of a variety of exercises, depending on who is leading PT that day. Usually this is done in PT shoes, shorts, and shirts, but on occasion PT can be conducted in boots, trousers, and a shirt. This is known as a "boots and utes" PT. It is not unusual to go on a 3,5, or even a 7-mile run, or to conduct a combat conditioning hike with a full combat load for any of the aforementioned distances or beyond. PT can also include exercises at the beach, swimming pool, obstacle course, gym, or even a friendly game of "touch" football.

Maintaining and further developing these standards of physical conditioning are essential components of the Marine Corps. Being in top physical condition is a benchmark in the Marine Corps way of life and fosters the idea of "esprit de corps" within a unit.

Sours: https://wab.marineparents.com/physical-fitness.asp
Hitler Reacts to New Marine Corps PFT Standards

.

You will also like:

.



66 67 68 69 70