2011 bmw

2011 bmw DEFAULT

PATRICK M. HOEY, MARC URBANO

INGO BARENSCHEE

The vast majority of long-term cars we order come loaded with all the newest and hottest options, sometimes with a blatant disregard for the bottom line. This, we freely admit, could be considered juvenile. But it gives us the ability to report on whether or not that $4000 list of interior trimmings is actually worth it.

This is not one of those cases. We wanted to get a jump on testing a new F10 535i sedan so badly that BMW let us choose from a selection of previously ordered vehicles. At the high end were 5ers costing close to $70,000. At the absolute low end was this white 535i with a manual transmission and the Sport package ($2200), Dynamic Handling package ($2700), a $400 iPod connector, and cinnamon-brown Dakota leather seats ($1450). Grand total: $57,225. On paper, we were drawn to its simplicity. We thought that this might be the kind of 5-series we would spec out were we to actually purchase one. One of the many lessons learned at the Bay of Pigs is that theory is often at odds with reality.

In the logbook’s first entry, associate online editor Jon Yanca set the tone for this car’s tenure: “I know everyone will complain about the lack of navigation, heated seats, and satellite radio.” Sure enough, entry after entry complained endlessly of cold seats and the cheap non-navigation iDrive display that resembles an old cathode-ray tube more than a modern LCD flat screen. Most 5 drivers were not aware that the Cold Weather package, and its heated seats, was not available at launch. No matter—we were resentful that a nearly $60,000 car had our backsides making their own heat on chilly mornings.

PATRICK M. HOEY, MARC URBANO

The 535i’s spartan mien did not stop it from becoming an instant long-haul favorite, however. Never mind the car’s shortcomings—numb steering, disappointing handling composure, and a hefty curb weight—that left it behind the Audi A6 and an Infiniti M37 in a ­comparison test [August 2010]; its odometer rolled past 20,000 miles in less than five months while visiting locations such as Myrtle Beach, Yellowstone National Park, and the Great Smoky Mountains. ­Editor-at-large John Phillips was one of many to commend the 535i for terrific interstate behavior, calling it “serene, composed, and quiet.” Yeah, that, and it was not unusual to hit 28 mpg on an interstate stretch. We averaged an impressive 23 mpg over 40,000 miles.

MORGAN SEGAL

Phillips was on a solo trip; had he been driving two-up, he surely would have noticed the dearth of cup holders fitted in the manual 535i.  Automatic-equipped 5-series cars have a pair of cup holders just in front of the gear selector. For the sake of clearance, manual versions dump the cup holders for a small bin and a short, three-quarter round cup bolster hidden beneath the passenger’s half of the center armrest, leaving  just one exposed beverage stabilizer that deploys at the push of a button. It’s not able to meet a Big Gulp on its own terms.

Now, enough with the frippery and onto the durability portion of this test. Early in its stay with us, when the car’s odo turned past 9000 miles, we discovered a bubble in the sidewall of the right-front Goodyear. It was the first of many wheel and tire expenses we incurred. The bulging tire was replaced for $447—more on that in a minute.

PATRICK M. HOEY, MARC URBANO

The first of two scheduled services, as determined by the 535i’s onboard computer and covered by BMW’s scheduled maintenance program, came in fall 2010 at roughly 19,000 miles. During it, BMW of Ann Arbor performed an oil change and some inspections; attended to a couple of recalls (a potentially faulty fuel-level sensor and new trunk trim that required a second trip to the dealer for installation); and also replaced (under warranty) a door-lock tab that went MIA.

After the 535i spent the winter months on Bridgestone Blizzak LM-60s, our local tire installer found that the right-rear wheel was severely bent, thus adding a $595 line item to the 5-series books at 32,000 miles.

It was at roughly this time that we started to notice the onset of automotive middle age. A few creaks and rattles but nothing alarming. Senior editor Tony Quiroga thought the engine never fully loosened up and that it continued to exhibit a bit of turbo lag when compared with other turbo sixes from BMW. His subjective feelings were contradicted by our track results, in which the 535i improved its end-of-test 0-to-60-mph and quarter-mile times by 0.1 second, to 5.7 and 14.2, respectively.

No money would exchange hands at the next service visit, it of the unscheduled ­variety, when the dealer repaired the console-mounted cup holder and replaced the HVAC control face because a few of the instructional pictograms on its buttons had worn off. In the past with other cars, we have paid for a cup-holder repair: Both of the above warranty items are a testament to the BMW 4-year/50,000-mile assurance. Company reps have told us that the only thing owners of new BMWs need to think about paying for during that time period is tires. To that very short list, we add wheels.

Around the 33,000-mile mark, the front tires were on their wear indicators, so we replaced them ($894) and discovered another bent wheel ($581). Then, 2000 miles later, after many observations by staffers about harsh suspension noises and vibrations, we asked the dealer to investigate. The service department said our car’s suspension and its bushings were just fine but the left-rear wheel and both of the fronts were bent. Plus, one of those 2000-mile-old front tires suffered an impact failure (likely at the same time the wheels were dented).

There was no way around spending another $447 on a front tire. In lieu of replacing three wheels to the tune of about $1750, we employed Alloy Wheel Repair Specialists to straighten three wheels for $405.

The second of two scheduled stops—oil change and inspections—came and went at 38,000 miles without breaching our wallet.

Right at the end of the test, at 40,000 miles, the rear tires were also at the end of their lives (after being shelved for 10,000 miles during the winter months) and needed to be replaced ($970). The dealer looked into what we thought was abnormal tire wear and charged us $134 for the inspection and $210 for an alignment. The closer look also revealed yet another bent front wheel ($135 tossed Alloy Wheel Repair Specialists’ way).

PATRICK M. HOEY, MARC URBANO

To recap: While the 535i was with us, we replaced two wheels (one front, one rear) and six tires (four worn, two damaged), and we repaired four wheels. The total bill for this, not including installation (which runs $163 for a full tire swap): $4474. We would have saved some cash had we purchased the 535i from a dealership and been upsold on the new BMW Tire & Wheel Protection program ($1389 for five years for a 5-series) because a $50 deductible covers replacement wheels and tires.

If it were not for the wheel and tire problems, the 535i would have finished its C/D tour of duty with very few strikes against it, one being that it was too thin in the options department. This was our fault—we underestimated how truly soft we’d become. But it’s a 5er that a hardier soul, or one who lives in a warm state, would buy.

The bigger problem is that, while the F10 535i gained 193 pounds and maintained its 51/49-percent weight distribution, its wheels weren’t beefed up for the extra 100 pounds carried by the front axle. Our first wheel specialist saw it right away: The wheels are soft. If you do find yourself in the market for a 535i like this one, a word of advice: Avoid potholes. That ought to be easy enough in a climate where you don’t need heated seats.

PATRICK M. HOEY, MARC URBANO

Wheelman

PATRICK M. HOEY, MARC URBANO

After replacing two of our BMW’s wheels at a cost of about $600 each, we investigated more affordable solutions and found Alloy Wheel Repair Specialists (AWRS). The company’s wheel repairmen make house calls. Call ’em up, and someone will come to your home or place of business and get to work fixing dents or curb rash. The process is surprisingly simple. The wheel is mounted on a vertical axle (similar to a tire-mounting machine), with or without a tire. After cleaning the wheel, the repairman measures it with a dial indicator to mark the low spots. Depending on the size of the deformation, the AWRS specialist might use a propane torch to soften the metal before employing a 10,000-psi ram to bring the wheel back to round, or close enough to successfully balance. If a wheel impact deforms the outer spokes, this company can’t repair the wheel. We called AWRS twice. The first repairman commented on how soft the 535i’s wheels are, but the second said he’d seen softer. We were charged $135 per wheel, but prices vary. Curb-rash repair starts at $125. And the company will even paint a wheel on-site. (800-518-3040; www.awrswheelrepair.com).

Aftermarket Navigation

PATRICK M. HOEY, MARC URBANO

As noted, our scantily optioned 535i lacked the comforts we’ve come to expect in luxury cars, such as an in-dash navigation system. With the prevalence of smartphones, a dedicated nav system may seem unnecessary. But, as we found in central Wyoming, having a navigation device that doesn’t require cellular service to download a map can save time, fuel, and sanity. At $280, the TomTom Go 2505 TM is in the upper-middle-class range of the portable-nav market. For the lifetime of the unit, it comes with map updates and traffic information. The touch-screen interface is logical, and you can customize the voice with a host of celebrity, cartoon, or movie-inspired themes. We went with Homer Simpson—$13 well spent. We had a little trouble getting the unit to sync with our computer when we wanted to install map updates or the custom voice. But once we worked out the bugs, it was trouble-free. (866–486–6866; www.tomtom.com).

Specifications

VEHICLE TYPE: front-engine, rear-wheel-drive, 5-passenger, 4-door sedan

PRICE AS TESTED: $57,225 (base price: $50,475)

ENGINE TYPE: turbocharged and intercooled DOHC 24-valve inline-6, aluminum block and head, direct fuel injection

Displacement: 182 cu in, 2979 cc
Power: 300 bhp @ 5800 rpm
Torque: 300 lb-ft @ 1200 rpm

TRANSMISSION: 6-speed manual

DIMENSIONS:
Wheelbase: 116.9 in
Length: 193.1 in
Width: 73.2 in Height: 57.6 in
Curb weight: 4075 lb

C/D TEST RESULTS:
Zero to 60 mph: 5.7 sec
Zero to 100 mph: 14.1 sec
Zero to 130 mph: 25.6 sec
Street start, 5-60 mph: 6.5 sec
Standing ¼-mile: 14.2 sec @ 101 mph
Top speed (governor limited): 155 mph
Braking, 70-0 mph: 165 ft
Roadholding, 300-ft-dia skidpad: 0.87 g

FUEL ECONOMY:
EPA city/highway driving: 19/28 mpg
C/D observed: 23 mpg
Unscheduled oil additions: 2 qt

WARRANTY:
4 years/50,000 miles bumper to bumper;
4 years/50,000 miles powertrain;
12 years/unlimited miles corrosion protection;
4 years/unlimited miles roadside assistance;
4 years/50,000 miles free routine maintenance


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Date: September 2010
Months in Fleet: 4 months
Current Mileage: 18,000 miles
Average Fuel Economy: 24 mpg
Average Range: 444 miles
Service: $0
Normal Wear: $9
Repair: $0

When it comes to ordering long-term test vehicles, we often choose models that have fared well in previous evaluations, and we usually load them up with options—case in point: our $100,000-plus long-term BMW 750Li xDrive. The idea, of course, is to see if our infatuation with a new model can stand the test of time, and to test the newest and best gadgets and technologies.

Our long-term 5-series contradicts both conventions. Indeed, a 535i just finished behind an Audi A6 3.0T and an Infiniti M37 in a comparison test, and we didn’t go options crazy with this one. We selected two extras we couldn’t live without (the $2200 Sport package and the $2700 Dynamic Handling package) and two we could live without but didn’t want to (Cinnamon Brown leather for $1450 and an overpriced iPod connector for $400). We passed on the opportunity to test one piece of new technology by requesting a six-speed manual transmission over the new ZF eight-speed automatic, but we made sure to check the box for the new single-turbo inline-six because we haven’t had one for more than a couple of weeks at a time.

What we ended up with is a $57,225 sedan that many of us would actually purchase. Perhaps the only two options we regret not fitting to our car are heated seats and navigation, which would have added $2400.

New to Whom?

You might be wondering why our “new” long-term 535i has 18,000 miles on the clock. We are just getting around to this introduction because the 5 has barely stopped moving since we collected it from BMW’s North American home base in New Jersey last May. It has performed interstate duty en route to destinations as varied as Yellowstone National Park, Florida, and North Carolina. Nearly every weekend finds the car two to three hours from home.

The 5’s popularity for such trips is not difficult to explain. For starters, it rides well and is particularly smooth with the adjustable suspension set in comfort. The cabin might as well be a direct transplant from the 7-series—it is almost as roomy and has similar seats. Some staffers have bemoaned the lack of bolster adjustment, as in Sport-pack-equipped 3s and our long-term 750Li, but all are pleased with the articulated front seatbacks that adjust separately to support the upper back.

Perhaps the greatest long-haul attraction comes in the form of the single-turbo N55 inline-six, the details of which are chronicled here. With the cruise set near 80 mph, a few of us have seen efficiency in the low-30-mpg range—better than that of many smaller, less-luxurious vehicles. EPA ratings for the 535i are 19 mpg city and 28 highway compared with the twin-turbo 2010 car’s 17/26. Average in our less-thrifty around-town blitzes, and we’re traveling 24 miles for every gallon of gas burned.

We knew this car’s 4075-pound weight—nearly 200 pounds heftier than the old 535i—would hamper it in a drag race, but we were surprised by how much slower this car is. We clocked a 0.6-second increase in the 0-to-60 time, which grew to 5.8 seconds. The quarter-mile took an extra half-second, ticking past in 14.3 at 100 mph, 2 mph slower than the old 535i.

An Unfeeling Bavarian

Few complaints have made their way into the logbook. Among those that have, the overwhelmingly popular gripe centers around the 535i’s horrific steering—the same problem that cost it the aforementioned comparison test. There’s not even a hint of on-center feel, and it loads up artificially. The on-center vagueness seriously compromises the driver’s perception of the car’s capabilities. We’re holding out hope that BMW will remedy this soon, as the 5 uses an electric power-steering rack that can be reprogrammed with all the ease of updating Firefox on a PC.

The usual complaint with Bimmers—cost of ownership—has yet to affect us. As with all BMWs, service is free until 50,000 miles or four years pass. We’ve not had to take the 5 to the dealer once, although we do expect the onboard computer to request a service soon. The only additional cost we’ve endured thus far was adding a $9 quart of oil.

Judging by the rapid accumulation of miles on our long-term 535i, we should complete the 40,000-mile test in about nine months. Most long-termers need a year, perhaps a little longer, to hit 40K; talk about bucking conventions.

Specifications

VEHICLE TYPE: front-engine, rear-wheel-drive, 5-passenger, 4-door sedan

PRICE AS TESTED: $57,225 (base price: $50,475)

ENGINE TYPE: turbocharged and intercooled DOHC 24-valve inline-6, aluminum block and head, direct fuel injection

Displacement: 182 cu in, 2979 cc
Power: 300 bhp @ 5800 rpm
Torque: 300 lb-ft @ 1200 rpm

TRANSMISSION: 6-speed manual

DIMENSIONS:
Wheelbase: 116.9 in
Length: 193.1 in
Width: 73.2 in Height: 57.6 in
Curb weight: 4075 lb

C/D TEST RESULTS:
Zero to 60 mph: 5.7 sec
Zero to 100 mph: 14.1 sec
Zero to 130 mph: 25.6 sec
Street start, 5-60 mph: 6.5 sec
Standing ¼-mile: 14.2 sec @ 101 mph
Top speed (governor limited): 155 mph
Braking, 70-0 mph: 165 ft
Roadholding, 300-ft-dia skidpad: 0.87 g

FUEL ECONOMY:
EPA city/highway driving: 19/28 mpg
C/D observed: 23 mpg
Unscheduled oil additions: 2 qt

WARRANTY:
4 years/50,000 miles bumper to bumper;
4 years/50,000 miles powertrain;
12 years/unlimited miles corrosion protection;
4 years/unlimited miles roadside assistance;
4 years/50,000 miles free routine maintenance


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Sours: https://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/a15121556/2011-bmw-535i-long-term-road-test-review/
Acceleration Acceleration Acceleration tests are conducted on a smooth, flat pavement straightaway at the track. Time, speed, and distance measurements are taken with a precise GPS-based device that’s hooked to a data-logging computer.
0 to 60 mph 0 to 60 mph (sec.) The time in seconds that a vehicle takes to reach 60 mph from a standstill with the engine idling.
Transmission Transmission Transmission performance is determined by shifting smoothness, response, shifter action, and clutch actuation for manual transmissions.
Braking Braking The braking rating is a composite of wet and dry stopping distances and pedal feel. Braking distance is from 60 mph, with no wheels locked.
Emergency Handling Emergency Handling Several factors go into the rating, including the avoidance maneuver speed and confidence, as well as how the vehicle behaves when pushed to its limit.
Comfort / Convenience Comfort / Convenience
Ride Ride Our expert judgment of how well the suspension isolates and absorbs road imperfections and how steady it keeps the body on various road surfaces.
Noise Noise Our expert judgment of the vehicle's interior noise level in everyday driving.
Front Seat Comfort Front Seat Comfort Our judgment of how comfortable the front seat is for drivers of various heights.
Rear Seat Comfort Rear Seat Comfort Our judgment of how comfortable the rear seat is for two passengers to sit across.
Interior Fit and Finish Interior Fit and Finish An expert evaluation of the interior quality and craftsmanship.
Trunk/Cargo Area Trunk/Cargo Area Our rating is based on the amount of luggage or cargo space that a vehicle has in the trunk or cargo area.
Fuel Economy & Emissions Fuel Economy & Emissions
Fuel Economy Fuel Economy We perform our own fuel-economy tests, independent of the government's often-quoted EPA figures and the manufacturers' claims. Using a precise fuel-flow measuring device spliced into the fuel line, we run two separate circuits to represent city and highway consumption.
Sours: https://www.consumerreports.org/cars/bmw/3-series/2011/overview/
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CARFAX Vehicle History Reports contain over 28 billion historical records from 20 European countries, the US and Canada, which are updated daily with new information.

Even if you live in a country we don't collect vehicle data from, it's still always worth checking the Vehicle Identification Number without obligation. The used car import and export market is booming and many owners would be surprised to find out exactly what happened to their vehicle during its previous life abroad.

Privacy for Customers — Transparency over Vehicles

Let's be clear: Although we strive to find every detail of a vehicle's life so far, we are focused only on the vehicle's history, and do not collect any information on previous owners. The information we provide relates solely to the vehicle, its odometer reading, any accidents that have been covered up, where the vehicle comes from and much more — it never gets personal. We've uncovered irreparable damage several times in the past, but other times our vehicle history checks draw a blank — and sometimes that's actually a good thing.

Second Hand — Not Second Best

Did you know that considerably more used cars are sold than new cars? We think this second-hand system is nothing short of fantastic. However, it goes without saying that it gives rise to different methods and tactics: Some sellers will disguise a car that's been in an accident under a fresh coat of paint, tamper with the odometer or conceal theft. This is one of the less appealing aspects of buying second hand. Our goal is to establish trusting relationships between buyers and sellers, since this is the best way to help customers make the right decision. Your new car should be reliable and make you feel safe, as well as make you feel like you haven't paid too much.

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We remain neutral and independent despite our partnerships — our sole purpose is help customers make an informed choice and ensure their safety and the safety of their family. This includes never collecting any personal details — we do not accept any PII from data sources amongst the information we provide about a vehicle. We ensure that data protection laws are observed at all times. Furthermore, we always collect our data in compliance with legal and regulatory frameworks — in all the countries in which we are active. We expressly distance ourselves from illegal activities such as data theft, scraping and hacking.

Sours: https://www.carfax.com/Used-2011-BMW-3-Series_z4212
รีวิว 2011 BMW 730LD F02 แรง หรู ประหยัด
TRIMOriginal MSRP
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The MT clean retail price reflects a reasonable asking price by a dealership for a fully reconditioned vehicle (clean title history, no defects, minimal wear) with average mileage.

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BMW 3-Series Expert Review

Staff Writer

The BMW 3 Series is the one car in the BMW lineup that most closely embodies the automaker's "Ultimate Driving Machine" tagline. The 3 Series lineup has a model variant that will suit just about any driver's taste. It doesn't matter if you choose a base 328i coupe or the amazing M3 sport sedan; you will likely be rewarded every time you drive a 3 Series.

The 3 Series lineup comes in coupe, sedan, wagon and convertible forms, and is offered with naturally aspirated, turbocharged and diesel versions of BMW's 3.0-liter

Arguably one of, if not the best all-around sports car on the market, the top-of-the-range M3 is pure driving bliss. You become one with the machine, sinking into the soft, supportive sport seats that hold you firmly in place when attacking a mountain road or a race track. With a simple push of the M button you can go from a perfectly comfortable cruiser to an all out performance monster.

Bodystyles: Coupe, sedan, wagon, convertibleEngines: 3.0L I-6, 3.0L turbocharged I-6, 3.0L diesel I-6, 4.0L V-8Transmissions: 6-speed automatic, 6-speed manual, 7-speed dual-clutch automated manualModels: 328i, 328ix (coupe, sedan, convertible, wagon),

The 335i gets the new inline-6 equipped with a single twin-scroll turbocharger, BMW's Valvetronic throttle-less intake technology, High Precision direct fuel injection, and all-aluminum construction. Also for 2011, the 3-Series coupes will be available with BMW's advanced xDrive all-wheel drive and traction system. BMW has further developed its iDrive nav and entertainment system with new graphics and controls.

The new design of the taillights is unique to the 3 Series Coupe and Convertible. The rear light cluster features two-piece L-shapes and a new color scheme. A new, broader hood and wider kidney grille have also been added.

There are no dramatic changes to the interior of the 3 Series, which features a variety of wood and aluminum trim packages are available at no cost, as well as leatherette or Dakota leather for your upholstery options available in a variety of colors.

Through years of refinement, the new I-6, both in naturally aspirated and turbo forms, is more responsive, more fuel efficient and cleaner-running than ever before. The turbo puts out the same power and torque as last year's engine (300/300) but does it more efficiently. The non-turbo 3.0-liter is rated at 230 horsepower and 200 pound-feet of torque, the same as last year.

The 3 Series' two-stage adaptive brake lights increase in intensity during a full ABS stop. Driver and passenger front airbags are standard, along with frontal side impact and front and rear head curtain bags. Traction and Stability Control are standard.

328i: 18 mpg city/28 mpg highway 328i convertible: 17-18 mpg city/33 mpg highway328i sports wagon: 17-18 mpg city/26-27 mpg highway328i sports wagon xDrive: 17 mpg city/25mpg highway335i: 19 mpg city/28 mpg highway335i: convertible 19 mpg city/28 mpg

  • Amazing performance
  • Wide variety of models
  • Decent interior space

The best BMW has to offer

  • Audi A4
  • Audi A5
  • Hyundai Genesis Coupe
  • Lexus IS
Sours: https://www.motortrend.com/cars/bmw/3-series/2011/

Bmw 2011

2011 BMW 328

Retail Price

$34,600 - $46,450MSRP / Window Sticker Price

Engine3.0L I-6
MPG18 City / 28 Hwy
Seating4 Passengers
Transmission6-spd man w/OD
Power230 @ 6500 rpm
Drivetrainrear-wheel
Smart Buy Program is powered by powered by TrueCar®
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2011 BMW 328i xDrive Review, Walkaround, Exhaust, \u0026 Test Drive

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