Git credentials mac

Git credentials mac DEFAULT

Caching your GitHub credentials in Git

Tip: If you clone GitHub repositories using SSH, then you can authenticate using an SSH key instead of using other credentials. For information about setting up an SSH connection, see "Generating an SSH Key."

GitHub CLI

GitHub CLI will automatically store your Git credentials for you when you choose as your preferred protocol for Git operations and answer "yes" to the prompt asking if you would like to authenticate to Git with your GitHub credentials.

  1. Install GitHub CLI on macOS, Windows, or Linux.
  2. In the command line, enter , then follow the prompts.
    • When prompted for your preferred protocol for Git operations, select .
    • When asked if you would like to authenticate to Git with your GitHub credentials, enter .

For more information about authenticating with GitHub CLI, see .

Git Credential Manager Core

Git Credential Manager Core (GCM Core) is another way to store your credentials securely and connect to GitHub over HTTPS. With GCM Core, you don't have to manually create and store a PAT, as GCM Core manages authentication on your behalf, including 2FA (two-factor authentication).

  1. Install Git using Homebrew:

  2. Install GCM Core using Homebrew:

    For MacOS, you don't need to run because GCM Core automatically configures Git for you.

The next time you clone an HTTPS URL that requires authentication, Git will prompt you to log in using a browser window. You may first be asked to authorize an OAuth app. If your account or organization requires two-factor auth, you'll also need to complete the 2FA challenge.

Once you've authenticated successfully, your credentials are stored in the macOS keychain and will be used every time you clone an HTTPS URL. Git will not require you to type your credentials in the command line again unless you change your credentials.

  1. Install Git for Windows, which includes GCM Core. For more information, see "Git for Windows releases" from its releases page.

We recommend always installing the latest version. At a minimum, install version 2.29 or higher, which is the first version offering OAuth support for GitHub.

The next time you clone an HTTPS URL that requires authentication, Git will prompt you to log in using a browser window. You may first be asked to authorize an OAuth app. If your account or organization requires two-factor auth, you'll also need to complete the 2FA challenge.

Once you've authenticated successfully, your credentials are stored in the Windows credential manager and will be used every time you clone an HTTPS URL. Git will not require you to type your credentials in the command line again unless you change your credentials.


Warning: Older versions of Git for Windows came with Git Credential Manager for Windows. This older product is no longer supported and cannot connect to GitHub via OAuth. We recommend you upgrade to the latest version of Git for Windows.

Warning: If you cached incorrect or outdated credentials in Credential Manager for Windows, Git will fail to access GitHub. To reset your cached credentials so that Git prompts you to enter your credentials, access the Credential Manager in the Windows Control Panel under User Accounts > Credential Manager. Look for the GitHub entry and delete it.

For Linux, install Git and GCM Core, then configure Git to use GCM Core.

  1. Install Git from your distro's packaging system. Instructions will vary depending on the flavor of Linux you run.

  2. Install GCM Core. See the instructions in the GCM Core repo, as they'll vary depending on the flavor of Linux you run.

  3. Configure Git to use GCM Core. There are several backing stores that you may choose from, so see the GCM Core docs to complete your setup. For more information, see "GCM Core Linux."

The next time you clone an HTTPS URL that requires authentication, Git will prompt you to log in using a browser window. You may first be asked to authorize an OAuth app. If your account or organization requires two-factor auth, you'll also need to complete the 2FA challenge.

Once you've authenticated successfully, your credentials are stored on your system and will be used every time you clone an HTTPS URL. Git will not require you to type your credentials in the command line again unless you change your credentials.

For more options for storing your credentials on Linux, see Credential Storage in Pro Git.


For more information or to report issues with GCM Core, see the official GCM Core docs at "Git Credential Manager Core."

Sours: https://docs.github.com/en/get-started/getting-started-with-git/caching-your-github-credentials-in-git

How do you reset the stored credentials in 'git credential-osxkeychain'?

From Terminal: (You need to enter the following three lines)

NOTE: after you enter “protocol=https” above you need to press ~~RETURN~~ TWICE (Each '⏎' is equivalent to a 'press enter/return' )


I'm not sure how to erase through the command line, but it's fairly easily to do it through the Keychain Access app. Just go to Applications -> Utilties -> Keychain Access, then enter "github.com". You can either delete the invalid item or update the password from with the app.


The solution turned out to be this:

The command was using the first GitHub account entry in my keychain. This one was not the one that had access to the projects in question.

I resolved the problem by touching the account in Keychain Access so that its date changed (I think I just changed the comment) and now that it became the most recent GitHub account it became the first one returned to credential-osxkeychain, and thus everything worked.

A better form of support for multiple GitHub accounts would be nice, but it is likely that most people only have one primary account and don't run into this problem.

Sours: https://newbedev.com/how-do-you-reset-the-stored-credentials-in-git-credential-osxkeychain
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Updating credentials from the macOS Keychain

Note: Updating credentials from the macOS Keychain only applies to users who manually configured a PAT using the helper that is built-in to macOS.

We recommend you either configure SSH or upgrade to the Git Credential Manager Core (GCM Core) instead. GCM Core can manage authentication on your behalf (no more manual PATs) including 2FA (two-factor auth).

When Git prompts you for your password, enter your personal access token (PAT) instead. Password-based authentication for Git has been removed, and using a PAT is more secure. For more information, see "Creating a personal access token."

Updating your credentials via Keychain Access

  1. Click on the Spotlight icon (magnifying glass) on the right side of the menu bar. Type then press the Enter key to launch the app. Spotlight Search bar
  2. In Keychain Access, search for github.com.
  3. Find the "internet password" entry for .
  4. Edit or delete the entry accordingly.

Deleting your credentials via the command line

Through the command line, you can use the credential helper directly to erase the keychain entry.

If it's successful, nothing will print out. To test that it works, try and clone a private repository from GitHub.com. If you are prompted for a password, the keychain entry was deleted.

Further reading

Sours: https://docs.github.com/en/get-started/getting-started-with-git/updating-credentials-from-the-macos-keychain
How to Make Git Remember Your Username and Password

Cache credentials

You only have to do this once per machine.

Why cache credentials?

As you have probably gathered by now, it will be annoying to enter your username and password each time you push changes to GitHub. It may even discourage you from pushing as frequently as you should. By storing your credentials on the computer, you won’t have to authenticate yourself manually each time you push to GitHub, and your credentials will be stored in a secure manner.

As of January 2019, if you install Git using these instructions, it is possible that Git will use a credential helper provided by your operating system. That is, you may not need to do anything special in order to cache your GitHub username and password. Specifically, if you are on macOS or Windows, don’t do anything described here until you have actual proof that it’s necessary, i.e. that you have experienced repeated challenges for your username and password when attempting to push/pull to GitHub.

Get a test repository

You need a functioning test Git repository. One that exists locally and remotely on GitHub, with the local repo tracking the remote. If you just setup Git with GitHub, you have a test repository. If you setup Git to work within RStudio, you have a test repository. If you already deleted those repositories, set one of them back up again.

You may proceed when

  • You have a test repo.
  • You know where it lives on your local computer. Example:
    • You know where it lives on GitHub. Example:
      • You know local is tracking remote. In a shell with working directory set to the local Git repo, enter these commands:

      We want to see that fetch and push are set to remote URLs that point to your GitHub repo. We also want to see that your local master branch has your GitHub master branch as upstream remote. Gibberish? Just check that your output looks similar to this.

      Verify Git is up-to-date

      In a shell, enter and verify that you have 1.7.10 or newer. If you don’t, update Git.

      Turn on the credential helper

      Windows

      In the shell, enter

      Mac

      Find out if the credential helper is already installed. In the shell, enter . You should see something like this: . If you do not, follow step 2 on the GitHub help page.

      Once you’ve confirmed you have the credential helper, enter .

      Linux

      In the shell, enter to store your password for ten million seconds (that’s roughly 16 weeks).

      Trigger a username/password challenge

      Change a file in your local repo and commit it. Do that however you wish. Here are shell commands that will work:

      Now push!

      One last time you will be asked for your username and password, which hopefully will be cached.

      Now push AGAIN.

      You should NOT be asked for your username and password, instead you should see .

      Rejoice and close the shell. From now on your “Push” button in RStudio will just work.

      More options: SSH

      Secure Shell (SSH) is an alternative method for authenticating trusted computers without using a password. There are some benefits to this approach over HTTPS, however it is generally more complicated to initially set up. If you wish to use this approach, see here for instructions on generating an SSH key and pairing it with your GitHub account.

      Acknowledgments

      Sours: https://cfss.uchicago.edu/setup/git-cache-credentials/

      Credentials mac git

      Git and GitHub

      What's a developer without Git? To install, run:

      When done, to test that it installed properly you can run:

      And should output .

      Next, we'll define your Git user (should be the same name and email you use for GitHub):

      They will get added to your file.

      To push code to your GitHub repositories, we will use the recommended HTTPS method. There are also instructions for using SSH. To prevent from asking for your username and password every time you push a commit you can cache your credentials by running the following command, as described in the instructions.

      Using HTTPS for GitHub (recommended)

      These instructions are from the official documentation.

      Clone repositories using HTTPS

      After creating a new repo on GitHub, clone it using:

      - if you had initialized with a README.

      If you did not, follow the instructions in the section below.

      Set up a new or existing repo with HTTPS for GitHub

      If you are setting up a new repo, add at least one file and commit first. Then, configure the remote and push to GitHub by running:

      SSH Config for GitHub

      These instructions are for those who wish to use SSH and not HTTPS, and are from the official documentation.

      Check for existing SSH keys

      First check for existing SSH keys on your computer by running:

      Check the directory listing to see if you have files named either or . If you don't have either of those files then read on, otherwise skip the next section.

      Generate a new SSH key

      If you don't have an SSH key you need to generate one. To do that you need to run the commands below, and make sure to substitute the placeholder with your email. The default settings are preferred, so when you're asked to enter a file in which to save the key, just press Enter to continue.

      Add your SSH key to the ssh-agent

      Run the following commands to add your SSH key to the .

      If you're running macOS Sierra 10.12.2 or later, you will need to modify your file to automatically load keys into the ssh-agent and store passphrases in your keychain:

      No matter what operating system version you run you need to run this command to complete this step:

      Adding a new SSH key to your GitHub account

      The last step is to let GitHub know about your SSH key so GitHub can recognize you. Run this command to copy your key to your clipboard:

      Then go to GitHub and input your new SSH key. Paste your key in the "Key" text-box and pick a name that represents the computer you're currently using.

      We are now ready to use SSH with GitHub!

      Clone repositories using SSH

      After creating a new repo on GitHub, clone it using

      - if you had initialized with a README.

      If you did not, follow the instructions in the section below.

      Set up a new or existing repo with SSH for GitHub

      If you are setting up a new repo, add at least one file and commit first. Then, configure the remote and push to GitHub by running:

      Sours: https://sourabhbajaj.com/mac-setup/Git/
      Using Personal Access Tokens with GIT and GitHub

      Bitbucket Support

      In addition to SSH, Bitbucket Server supports HTTP or HTTPS for pushing and pulling from managed Git repositories. However, Git does not cache the user's credentials by default, so you need to re-enter them each time you perform a clone, push or pull.

      This page describes two methods for permanently authenticating with Git repositories so that you can avoid typing your username and password each time you are pushing to or pulling from Bitbucket Server.

      Using credential caching

      You need Git 1.7.9 or above to use the HTTPS Credentials Caching feature.

      Windows

       On Windows you can use the application git-credential-winstore.

      1. Download the software.
      2. Run it.
      3. You will be prompted for credentials the first time you access a repository, and Windows will store your credentials for use in the future.

      Linux

      On Linux you can use the 'cache' authentication helper that is bundled with Git 1.7.9 and higher. From the Git documentation:

      This command caches credentials in memory for use by future git programs. The stored credentials never touch the disk, and are forgotten after a configurable timeout. The cache is accessible over a Unix domain socket,
      restricted to the current user by filesystem permissions.

      Run the command below to enable credential caching. After enabling credential caching any time you enter your password it will be cached for 1 hour (3600 seconds):

      Run the command below for an overview of all configuration options for the 'cache' authentication helper:

      macOS

      Follow these steps to use Git with credential caching on macOS:

      1. Download the binary git-credential-osxkeychain.
      2. Run the command below to ensure the binary is executable:

      3. Put it in the directory /usr/local/bin.
      4. Run the command below:

      Using the .netrc file

      The file is a mechanism that allows you to specify which credentials to use for which server. This method allows you to avoid entering a username and password every time you push to or pull from Git, but your Git password is stored in plain text.

      Warning!

      • Git uses a utility called cURL under the covers, which respects the use of the .netrc file. Be aware that other applications that use cURL to make requests to servers defined in your file will also now be authenticated using these credentials. Also, this method of authentication is potentially unsuitable if you are accessing your Bitbucket Server instance via a proxy, as all cURL requests that target a path on that proxy server will be authenticated using your  credentials.
      • cURL will not match the machine name in your .netrc if it has a username in it, so make sure you edit your  file in the root of your clone of the repository and remove the user and '@' part from any clone URL's (URL fields) that look like to make them look like

      Windows

      1. Create a text file called  in your home directory (e.g. ). cURL has problems resolving your home directory if it contains spaces in its path (e.g. ). However, you can update your environment variable to point to any directory, so create your  in a directory with no spaces in it (for example ) then set your environment variable to point to the newly created directory.
      2. Add credentials to the file for the server or servers you want to store credentials for, using the format described below:

      Linux or macOS

      1. Create a file called  in your home directory (). Unfortunately, the syntax requires you to store your passwords in plain text - so make sure you modify the file permissions to make it readable only to you.
      2. Add credentials to the file for the server or servers you want to store credentials for, using the format described in the 'Windows' section above. You may use either IP addresses or hostnames, and you do not need to specify a port number, even if you're running Bitbucket Server on a non-standard port.

      3. And that's it! Subsequent , and  requests will now be authenticated using the credentials specified in this file.
      Sours: https://confluence.atlassian.com/display/BITBUCKETSERVER078/Permanently+authenticating+with+Git+repositories

      Now discussing:

      7.14 Git Tools - Credential Storage

      A Custom Credential Cache

      Given that and friends are separate programs from Git, it’s not much of a leap to realize that any program can be a Git credential helper. The helpers provided by Git cover many common use cases, but not all. For example, let’s say your team has some credentials that are shared with the entire team, perhaps for deployment. These are stored in a shared directory, but you don’t want to copy them to your own credential store, because they change often. None of the existing helpers cover this case; let’s see what it would take to write our own. There are several key features this program needs to have:

      1. The only action we need to pay attention to is ; and are write operations, so we’ll just exit cleanly when they’re received.

      2. The file format of the shared-credential file is the same as that used by .

      3. The location of that file is fairly standard, but we should allow the user to pass a custom path just in case.

      Once again, we’ll write this extension in Ruby, but any language will work so long as Git can execute the finished product. Here’s the full source code of our new credential helper:

      1. Here we parse the command-line options, allowing the user to specify the input file. The default is .

      2. This program only responds if the action is and the backing-store file exists.

      3. This loop reads from stdin until the first blank line is reached. The inputs are stored in the hash for later reference.

      4. This loop reads the contents of the storage file, looking for matches. If the protocol, host, and username from match this line, the program prints the results to stdout and exits.

      We’ll save our helper as , put it somewhere in our and mark it executable. Here’s what an interactive session looks like:

      Since its name starts with “git-”, we can use the simple syntax for the configuration value:

      As you can see, extending this system is pretty straightforward, and can solve some common problems for you and your team.

      prev | next

      Sours: https://git-scm.com/book/en/v2/Git-Tools-Credential-Storage


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