Highway 162 california

Highway 162 california DEFAULT

Road Trip Planning

Miles KmsItemSummary
0.0
0.0

1184 ft.

Junction
Junction United States Highway #101, with California State Highway #162, at Longvale, California, a community located in Mendocino County, California. This is where California State Highway #162 starts its run towards Covelo, California, where this portion of the State Highway #162 ends.
8.3
13.3

1050 ft.

Forest Route
Forest Route, to, Dead Cow Lake, a small lake located off State Route #162,
11.1
17.9

974 ft.

Ford Street: Eal River
Ford Street, crosses over the Eal River, at Community of Tatu, California, along State Route #162.
15.2
24.5

942 ft.

Dos Rios Road
Dos Rios Road, Poonkinny Road, Swimming Area on Dos Rios River, Vinton Lake, Eal River, Poonkinny Lake,
21.3
34.2

1985 ft.

Access: River
Access, to Eal River bank,
26.7
42.9

1404 ft.

Fairbanks Lane
Poonkinney Road / Fairbanks Lane, wind through in the Round Valley
29.1
46.8

1398 ft.

Covelo, CA
Foothill Boulevard, Covelo, California, a community in Mendocino County, California, Round Valley Airport, a public airport located southwest of Covelo, California, serving Mendocino County, California.
30.7
49.4

1401 ft.

Mina Road/Round Valley Ranch Road
Mina Road/Round Valley Ranch Road, Hurt Road, Community of Covelo, California,
32.9
53.0

1381 ft.

Junction
Junction of California State Route #162 with Mendocino Pass Road, Short Creek Road, at the entrance of Mendocino National Forest. This is where the State Highway #162/section-1 ends. And, the section-2 of State Route #162 continues its run after crossing the Mendocino National Forest by a Forest Route at Elkcreek, California.


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California 162


The Bidwell Bar Bridge carries California 162 over the Middle Fork of the Feather River, which is a branch of sprawling Lake Oroville. This suspension bridge, built in 1965, carries the two-lane Oroville-Quincy Highway through the state recreation area. Photo taken 05/24/08.

California 162 has two segments: a western segment in Mendocino County from U.S. 101 to Round Valley and an eastern segment from Elk Creek to Lake Oroville. A missing middle segment over Mendocino Pass in the Mendocino National Forest is proposed but remains unconstructed. An unpaved forest service road approximates the proposed state route corridor, but it is unlikely to be built.

Along California 162, several vistas such as this one allow for views of the Eel River along with the highway as California 162 travels east. Photo taken 05/26/06.
A train tunnel can be seen along California 162 as the highway continues to follow the Eel River. Photo taken 05/26/06.
The Rodeo Creek bridge was constructed in 1940 and is still in use today. Photo taken 05/26/06.
A California 162 reassurance shield is posted after the Rodeo Creek bridge. Photo taken 05/26/06.
Another scenic view of the Eel River and California 162 comes into view as the state highway continues traveling north and east toward Dos Rios and Covelo. Photo taken 05/26/06.
The Dos Rios cut off allows for a short cut route from California 162 west to U.S. 101 at Laytonville via Laytonville-Dos Rios Road. At the time this photo was taken, the cut off road was closed due to slides from the previous winter's rains. Photo taken 05/26/06.
During winter months, the route through Mendocino National Forest (including Mendocino Pass) is not maintained for snow removal and is not appropriate for winter travel. Photo taken 05/26/06.
East of Dos Rios, California 162 pulls away from the Eel River and climbs over a pass over the Poonkinny Ridge, with Round Mountain visible to the east. Photo taken 05/26/06.
After the climb and descent from Poonkinny Ridge, California 162 lands in the Round Valley, traveling due north now toward the town of Covelo. A good portion of the northern Round Valley is part of the Round Valley Indian Reservation. Photo taken 05/26/06.
A circular welcome sign for Round Valley is posted alongside California 162. Photo taken 05/26/06.
Entering the town of Covelo, houses can be seen along northbound California 162 as the state highway continues. Covelo had a population of 1,175 as of the 2000 Census. Photo taken 05/26/06.
Very expensive gas and shops can be found in Covelo. California 162 continues north through downtown Covelo. Of course we only have ourselves to blame: May 2006 was one of the most expensive times to take a road trip in California in terms of gas prices. Photo taken 05/26/06.
The Covelo Ranger Station for Mendocino National Forest provides information and maps for visitors to the national forest as well as allow back country users to register. Photo taken 05/26/06.
California 162 turns east again at this intersection; turn right to follow California 162 (via Mendocino Pass Road) or continue straight ahead to Zenia via Mina Road. Photo taken 05/26/06.
Now traveling east on California 162/Mendocino Pass Road, the state highway feels more like a country lane with lush foliage and farms on either side. Photo taken 05/26/06.
Reaching the end of the Round Valley, California 162 passes by a farm house and prepares to reach its end. California 162 ends at the Short Creek bridge (built in 1962), which is signed with an end shield. Photo taken 05/26/06.
After the end shield, California 162 becomes Forest Service Highway 7 and is shielded with this tiny brown sign. From here, the forest service route crosses over Mendocino Pass, but much of the route is substandard and unpaved. Photo taken 05/26/06.
Now in the Sacramento Valley and traveling east along California 162 after the northern California 99 intersection, this California 162 route marker points the way east toward Oroville. Photo taken 05/24/08.
Immediately after leaving California 99, two-lane California 162 crosses the Thermalito Afterbay via a causeway. The afterbay allows water to be stored after exiting Lake Oroville to produce hydroelectric power when needed while maintaining a controlled flow on the Feather River downstream. The water from the afterbay can also be pumped back into the reservoir for additional power and water needs. Photos taken 05/24/08.
After the California 70 interchange, California 162 shares alignment briefly with California 70 Business. The two routes will both follow Oroville Dam Boulevard between California 70 and Myers Street, where California 70 Business will turn north onto Myers Street. The business route passes through downtown Oroville, then returns to California 70 via Nelson Avenue. Photos taken 01/15/06 and 05/24/08.
Three sets of powerlines cross over California 162, each with their own unique tower design. These lines carry power past the Oroville Dam complex south. Photos taken 05/24/08.
Eastbound California 162 approaches the turnoff to Tyme Way. Photo taken 01/15/06.
At the junction with Oroville-Quincy Highway, California 162/Olive Highway merges onto Oroville-Quincy Highway. This designation will carry the rest of California 162 until its end in the state recreation area, and it will continue as a county road all the way to Quincy, offering an alternative to California 70 over a parallel route. Photo taken 01/15/06.
Eastbound California 162/Olive Highway (Oroville-Quincy Highway) approaches the turnoff to Butte County B-2/Canyon Drive north to Oroville Dam. The county route designation is poorly signed; it takes Canyon Drive north to Oroville Dam Boulevard, then turns west on Oroville Dam Boulevard, Orange Avenue, and Montgomery Street into downtown Oroville. Photo taken 01/15/06.
Continuing east, California 162/Olive Highway (Oroville-Quincy Highway) approaches the intersection with Kelly Ridge Road (north) and Miners Ranch Road (south). Use Kelly Ridge Road north to the Lake Oroville State Recreation Area Visitors Center. Photo taken 01/15/06.
A California 162 east reassurance shield is posted after the Kelly Ridge Road intersection. Ahead, California 162 enters Lake Oroville State Recreation Area. Photo taken 01/15/06.
Another California 162 east reassurance shield is posted further in the state recreation area. Photo taken 01/15/06.
Turn left here for the Loafer Creek site, which includes a boat ramp, campground, and picnic area. Photo taken 05/24/08.
The Bidwell Bar Bridge carries California 162 over the Middle Fork of the Feather River, which is a branch of sprawling Lake Oroville. This suspension bridge, dedicated on September 25, 1965, carries the two-lane Oroville-Quincy Highway through the state recreation area. The total bridge length is 1,792 feet, and the main span is 1,108 feet. This Bidwell Bar Bridge, which rises to an elevation of 627 feet above the streambed, replaced the original Bidwell Bar Bridge, which crossed the river prior to the construction of the dam and inundation of the site of the original bridge. The original bridge was moved prior to the area being flooded and is now used as part of a walking path at the south side of the lake near a parking lot located at the north end of Bidwell Canyon Road near a marina. Along this "new" suspension bridge, "eastbound" California 162 is actually traveling due north. Photos taken 01/15/06 and 05/24/08.
California 162 stays within sight of the waters of Lake Oroville as it proceeds north off the Bidwell Bar Bridge en route to the state route's eastern terminus. A realignment was required to prevent the highway from slipping into the lake, hence the deep cuts into the side of the hill. Photo taken 05/24/08.
California 162 continues to skirt the eastern edge of Lake Oroville as the state highway proceeds north. Photo taken 01/15/06.
Another bridge carries California 162 over another branch of Lake Oroville. Known as the Canyon Creek Bridge, this bridge was constructed in 1967 and allows motorists to continue northeast toward Quincy. Most of the route to Quincy is county maintained, but the state highway will continue for another mile. Photo taken 01/15/06.
The narrow, two-lane Canyon Creek Bridge carries California 162 north over this branch of Lake Oroville. Photo taken 01/15/06.
California 162 continues north on dry land. Photo taken 01/15/06.
Eastbound California 162 approaches its eastern terminus at Foreman Creek Road. Turn left on Foreman Creek Road to the Foreman Creek site of the Lake Oroville State Recreation Area. Photo taken 01/15/06.
At Foreman Creek Road, eastbound California 162 comes to a seemingly abrupt end. The state only built California 162 this far east; from here northeast to Quincy, the Oroville-Quincy Highway is county maintained. This easternmost segment of California 162 is a product of the Lake Oroville project; the bridges and cuts needed to route a highway above the lake level was done by the state as part of the State Water Project. Photo taken 01/15/06.
California 162 west
California 162 begins its westbound journey along Oroville-Quincy Highway at the intersection with Foreman Creek Road in Lake Oroville State Recreation Area. The state route helps carry through traffic through the bridges necessitated by the creation of Lake Oroville and also allows access to several recreation area sites along the way. California 162 will mostly travel south until curving west toward the city of Oroville. This is the first westbound shield for California 162. Photo taken 01/15/06.
California 162 will cross two major bridges to follow the eastern edge of Lake Oroville. The first bridge is the Canyon Creek Bridge, which is visible at the bottom of this grade. The bridge was built in 1967 and allows California 162 to pass above this branch of Lake Oroville. A second bridge, the Bidwell Bar Bridge (suspension bridge) is a bit further south of here. Photo taken 01/15/06.
Westbound California 162 crosses over the Canyon Creek Bridge, which has two lanes and no shoulders. Photo taken 01/15/06.
Fairly major rock cuts were needed to route California 162 between the Canyon Creek Bridge and the Bidwell Bar Bridge. Photo taken 01/15/06.
The Bidwell Bar Bridge carries California 162 over the Middle Fork of the Feather River, which is a branch of sprawling Lake Oroville. This suspension bridge, dedicated on September 25, 1965, carries the two-lane Oroville-Quincy Highway through the state recreation area. The total bridge length is 1,792 feet, and the main span is 1,108 feet. This Bidwell Bar Bridge, which rises to an elevation of 627 feet above the streambed, replaced the original Bidwell Bar Bridge, which crossed the river prior to the construction of the dam and inundation of the site of the original bridge. The original bridge was moved prior to the area being flooded and is now used as part of a walking path at the south side of the lake near a parking lot located at the north end of Bidwell Canyon Road near a marina. Along this "new" suspension bridge, "eastbound" California 162 is actually traveling due north. Photos taken 01/15/06 and 05/24/08.
A plaque commemmorating the dedication of the Bidwell Bar Bridge is located at the base of the north suspension tower on the west side (next to the sidewalk). Photo taken 01/15/06.
Westbound California 162 approaches the turnoff to Forbestown Road en route to Forbestown (14 miles) and Feather Falls (18 miles). Photo taken 01/15/06.
A California 162 west reassurance shield is posetd after the Forbestown Road intersection. Photo taken 01/15/06.
The Sacramento Valley and Sutter Buttes come into view as California 162 loses elevation within the state recreation area. Photo taken 01/15/06.
Westbound California 162 approaches the turnoff to Kelly Ridge Road. Turn right at the next intersection to the Lake Oroville State Recreation Area visitors center. Photo taken 01/15/06.
A bit further ahead, westbound California 162 approaches Butte County B-2/Canyon Drive to Oroville Dam. B-2 connects to the dam, then turns west to follow Oroville Dam Boulevard, Orange Avenue, and Montgomery Street into downtown Oroville. B-2 is mostly unsigned. Photo taken 01/15/06.
A California 162 west reassurance shield is posted after the B-2 intersection. Photo taken 01/15/06.
Oroville-Quincy Highway splits away from California 162 at this intersection. California 162 veers left along Olive Highway. Photo taken 01/15/06.
California 162 serves the Gold Country Casino (left turn ahead). Photo taken 01/15/06.
Entering the city of Oroville, California 162 will split from Olive Highway and turn onto Oroville Dam Boulevard. Photo taken 01/15/06.
Westbound California 162 approaches California 70 Business/Myers Street north. Unfortunately, the intersection with California 70 Business is unsigned from this direction. Ahead, California 70 Business will merge onto California 162 (Oroville Dam Boulevard) west. Photo taken 01/15/06.
California 70 Business south & 162 west
Soon thereafter, California 162 (Oroville Dam Boulevard) west and California 70 Business south meet Lincoln Street at this intersection. Photo taken 01/15/06.
A California 70 Business reassurance marker is posted after the Lincoln Street intersection. Photo taken 01/15/06.
Westbound California 162 (Oroville Dam Boulevard) and southbound California 70 Business meet Fifth Avenue at this traffic signal. Photo taken 01/15/06.
The right lane of California 162 (Oroville Dam Boulevard) west becomes exit only for California 70 north to Chico and Quincy. This marks the western terminus of California 70 Business. Photo taken 01/15/06.
Westbound California 162 (Oroville Dam Boulevard) meets the on-ramp to California 70 north. The next left connects to California 70 south to Marysville, and California 162 itself continues west to Willows. Photo taken 01/15/06.
California 162 west
The first shield for California 162 west in Mendocino County is posted here, at the Short Creek bridge along Mendocino Pass Road. California 162 travels west to Covelo, turns south to cross the Poonkinny Ridge, crosses the ridge in a westerly direction to Dos Rios, then aims south and west to meet U.S. 101 near Longvale alongside the Middle Fork of the Eel River. Photos taken 05/26/06.
Westbound California 162 approaches Laytonville-Dos Rios Road at the Dos Rios cutoff. This route was not open at the time this picture was taken. Photos taken 05/26/06.
California 162 west crosses the Middle Fork of the Eel River. Photo taken 05/26/06.
Views of the Eel River, such as this one, can be fantastic. Photo taken 05/26/06.
Westbound California 162 crosses the Rodeo Creek bridge (1940) near Postmile 10.08. Photo taken 05/26/06.
Continuing west, California 162/Covelo Road again crosses the Middle Fork of the Eel River on this bridge. California 162 sees multiple Eel River crossings along the Covelo Road segment. Photos taken 05/26/06.
The last bridge on westbound California 162 carries the state highway over the Long Valley Creek (built in 1995). Photo taken 05/26/06.
California 162 is signed to end at its intersection with U.S. 101. Turn north on U.S. 101 to Laytonville or south to Willits. Photo taken 05/26/06.
California 162 scenes
This series of pictures shows some scenery shots of the new Bidwell Bar Bridge, which was dedicated on September 25, 1965. This suspension bridge was needed once Oroville Dam was built, as the new Lake Oroville would overwhelm and inundate the original Bidwell Bar Bridge. The total bridge length is 1,792 feet, and the main span is 1,108 feet. This Bidwell Bar Bridge, which rises to an elevation of 627 feet above the streambed, replaced the original Bidwell Bar Bridge, which crossed the river prior to the construction of the dam and inundation of the site of the original bridge. The original suspension bridge is historic as it dates back to the 1850s. Photos taken 05/24/08.


Back to California 161 Return to the California Gateway  Continue to California 163

Page Updated January 6, 2012.

Sours: https://www.aaroads.com/california/ca-162.html
  1. Purple smoke bomb
  2. Drum music sheet
  3. Stiehl chainsaws

California State Route 162

Highway in California

State Route 162 (SR 162) is a state highway in the U.S. state of California that runs roughly west–east through the Coast Ranges and the Sacramento Valley to the western slopes of the Sierra Nevada. It begins at U.S. Route 101 near Longvale, in Mendocino County, and ends at Brush Creek, in Butte County. For most of its length, it is a two lane, undivided highway. SR 162 is not signed as a contiguous route through Mendocino National Forest in Mendocino and Glenn counties. Instead, the portion inside the national forest is federally maintained by the U.S. Forest Service as Forest Highway 7 (FH 7), and is not included in the state route logs.

Route description[edit]

State Route 162 (SR 162) begins in Mendocino County at Longvale, 10 miles (16 km) south of the town of Laytonville along U.S. Route 101. It goes east through Long Valley next to the Middle Fork of the Eel River. On the opposite bank of the river is the right of way of the disused Northwestern Pacific Railroad. It is 28 miles (45 km) from Longvale to Covelo. This portion of SR 162 is called Covelo Road. Covelo is in Round Valley, home of the Round Valley Indian Reservation.[1] SR 162 is called Covelo Road, Commercial Street, and/or Mina Road as it goes north through the center of town. Beyond Covelo, there are 11 miles (18 km) of paved road, called Mendocino Pass Road, between Covelo and the Mendocino National Forest; most of this portion of Mendocino Pass Road is primarily controlled by Mendocino County instead of under state maintenance.

End of California Route 162

When entering the national forest the road becomes Forest Highway 7 (FH 7). FH 7 is maintained by the U.S. Forest Service as it continues across the Mendocino National Forest for approximately 50 miles (80 km) over Mendocino Pass (5,006 ft or 1,526 m), which is closed in winter due to heavy snowfall. The highest point on the road (6,805 ft or 2,074 m) is just north of Black Butte and about 4 miles (6.4 km) NW of Copper City. It is roughly 35 miles (56 km) along the unpaved road to Alder Springs, which is inside the Mendocino National Forest in Glenn County. Alder Springs is the location of the Alder Springs GASB site, which is part of the Consolidated Reporting of Earthquakes and Tsunamis (CREST) network run by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). State Route 162 resumes near Alder Springs and it is 41 miles (66 km) from there to Willows. Along the way, SR 162 crosses Stoney Creek and runs east paralleling Nye Creek. Seven miles west (11 km) of Willows is Thunderhill Raceway Park. At Willows, SR 162 passes the Willows-Glenn County Airport and crosses Interstate 5.

From Willows and the intersection of Interstate 5, SR 162 runs east for 9 miles (14 km) to the town of Glenn. The track of SR 162 turns right and follows State Route 45 south for 4 miles (6.4 km) along the bank of the Sacramento River to Codora. The highway then turns left going east, crosses the Sacramento River and enters the town of Butte City. The highway jogs north as it passes through Butte City, then east again going 20 miles (32 km) due east to meet State Route 99 (formerly U.S. Route 99). This section is called the Butte City Highway. SR 162 turns north along SR 99 then east again as Oroville Dam Boulevard.

SR 162 turns right, (SE), onto Olive Highway as it leaves Oroville

Travelling east, SR 162 passes the Thermalito Afterbay and the Oroville Municipal Airport,[2] before crossing the Feather River on the Randy Jennings Memorial Bridge. As the highway enters Oroville, it crosses under State Route 70. This section is named Oroville Dam Blvd or "Oro-Dam". SR 162 goes 2 miles (3.2 km) through the center of Oroville then turns right onto Olive Highway. Olive Highway goes east 7+1⁄4 miles (11.7 km) to Kelly Ridge Road where it turns north and crosses Lake Oroville over the Bidwell Bar Bridge. SR 162 ends along the Oroville-Quincy Highway at Foreman Creek Road along the eastern edge of the Lake Oroville National Recreation Area.

The junction of SR 162 and the Oroville-Quincy Highway near Lake Oroville SRA Headquarters

The Oroville-Quincy Highway begins in Oroville at Oro-Dam Blvd E just past Olive Highway and runs east. It continues east roughly paralleling Olive Highway until it merges with SR 162 just before Oakvale Ave. It breaks off from SR 162 at Wally B Lane running parallel to the highway for a mile or so before reconnecting at Kelly Ridge Road. The highway runs roughly north and crosses Lake Oroville over the Bidwell Bar Bridge. SR 162 ends near here at Foreman Creek Road, but the Oroville-Quincy Highway continues toward Berry Creek and Madrone Lake. Here it turns east again and runs 6.5 miles (10.5 km) to Brush Creek. From Brush Creek, the highway turns north for 12.5 miles (20.1 km) to Palmetto. Here the highway turns ENE 11 miles (18 km) to Buck's Lodge and Bucks Lake. It then goes 16.25 miles (26.15 km) east along Bucks Lake Road past Meadow Valley and Spanish Ranch before arriving at Quincy, a total distance of 62.75 miles (100.99 km).

SR 162 is part of the California Freeway and Expressway System,[3] but is not part of the National Highway System,[4] a network of highways that are considered essential to the country's economy, defense, and mobility by the Federal Highway Administration.[5]

History[edit]

In 1915, the Oroville-Quincy Highway was designated as Legislative Route Number 30.[6] This route was abandoned by the state in 1924. In the late 1930s, there was a temporary routing of Alternate US 40 that ran from Davis through Yuba City to Oroville thence to Quincy along Oroville-Quincy Highway, and Bucks Lake Road.

From 1965 to 1972, the segment from US 101 to Interstate 5 was defined as route 261. [7]

Major intersections[edit]

Except where prefixed with a letter, postmiles were measured on the road as it was in 1964, based on the alignment that existed at the time, and do not necessarily reflect current mileage. R reflects a realignment in the route since then, M indicates a second realignment, L refers an overlap due to a correction or change, and T indicates postmiles classified as temporary (for a full list of prefixes, see California postmile § Official postmile definitions).[8] Segments that remain unconstructed or have been relinquished to local control may be omitted. The numbers reset at county lines; the start and end postmiles in each county are given in the county column.

  1. ^ abIndicates that the postmile represents the distance along SR 45 rather than SR 162.
  2. ^ abIndicates that the postmile represents the distance along SR 99 rather than SR 162.
Along California Route 162.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"Round Valley Indian Reservation History". www.covelo.net. Archived from the original on 13 October 2007. Retrieved September 17, 2018.
  2. ^"AirNav: KOVE - Oroville Municipal Airport". www.airnav.com. Retrieved September 17, 2018.
  3. ^"Article 2 of Chapter 2 of Division 1". California Streets and Highways Code. Sacramento: California Office of Legislative Counsel. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  4. ^Federal Highway Administration (March 25, 2015). National Highway System: California (North)(PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Washington, DC: Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved September 24, 2017.
  5. ^Natzke, Stefan; Neathery, Mike & Adderly, Kevin (June 20, 2012). "What is the National Highway System?". National Highway System. Washington, DC: Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved July 1, 2012.
  6. ^"California Highways: Chronology of California Highways 1915-1932". www.cahighways.org. Retrieved September 17, 2018.
  7. ^"California Highways (www.cahighways.org): Route 261". www.cahighways.org. Retrieved September 17, 2020.
  8. ^ abCalifornia Department of Transportation. "State Truck Route List". Sacramento: California Department of Transportation. Archived from the original(XLS file) on June 30, 2015. Retrieved June 30, 2015.
  9. ^California Department of Transportation (July 2007). "Log of Bridges on State Highways". Sacramento: California Department of Transportation.
  10. ^California Department of Transportation, All Traffic Volumes on CSHS, 2005 and 2006

External links[edit]

Route map:

Template:Attached KML/California State Route 162

KML is from Wikidata

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_State_Route_162
Hwy 162 CA East to West

State Route 162

Sacramento River Bridge (03-Gle-162, PM 76.3/78.6)

In March 2016, it was reported that Caltrans was reconsidering a number of alternatives to demolishing and replacing the Sacramento River Bridge on Route 162 near Butte City. The original plans was that Caltrans would demolish the current steel truss bridge — built in 1947 and no longer earthquake-safe — and build a new one along the current road alignment. That approach would close Route 162 at the crossing for 18 months, spanning from June 2020 to November 2021. Caltrans proposed redirecting traffic — an average of 2,400 vehicles per day, 20% of which are trucks — on a 34-mile detour to use the bridge at Ordbend. Many members of the public were curious as to why a new bridge could not be built beside the old one, so that Route 162 could remain open during construction. The primary challenge to that approach is connecting a new bridge to the causeway leading up to the old one. Other options include putting a temporary bridge in place, but additional costs would be added with that approach, also. After hearing comments from the public, Caltrans is re-evaluating.
(Source: Andy3175 @ AAroads, 3/3/2016; Appeal-Democrat, 2/23/2016)

In June 2019, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding project is located on Route 162 near Butte City in Glenn County (03-Gle-162, PM 76.3/78.6). The project proposes to replace the Sacramento River Bridge (No. 11-0017). The project proposes to seismic retrofit the existing bridge by replacing both segments of the current bridge and reconstruct the east side roadway to conform with the new structure. The proposed project addresses issues of the current bridge built in 1948 and deemed seismically vulnerable to section losses in pilings as well as viaduct concrete girders exhibiting signs of distress due to insufficient shear capacity. This project proposes to preserve and extend the useful life of the existing roadway and meet current design standards. The project is currently programmed in the 2018 State Highway Operation Protection Program (SHOPP) for an estimated total of $54.0 million which includes Construction (capital and support) and Right-of-Way (capital and support). Construction is estimated to begin in fiscal year 2021-22. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2018 SHOPP.
(Source: June 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.2c.(1))

In June 2019, the CTC approved the following SHOPP SB1 support phase allocation: $6,900,000 03-GLE-162 76.3/78.6 PPNO 2633 ProjID 0312000052. Route 162 At Butte City, from Route 45 to 0.1 mile east of McDougall Street. Replace Sacramento River Bridge and Viaduct No. 11-0017 and reconstruct east side roadway to conform with new structure. PS&E $5,500,000 R/W Support $1,400,000. (Concurrent consideration of funding under Resolution E-19-49; June 2019.) (As part of this allocation request, the Department is requesting to extend the completion of the R/W Sup phase an additional 17 months beyond the 36 month deadline.) (Concurrent SB 1 Baseline Agreement approval under Resolution SHOPP-P-1819-13B.) (Concurrent amendment under SHOPP Amendment 18H-010.)
(Source June 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.5b.(2b) Item 4)

The 2020 SHOPP, approved in May 2020, included the following Bridge Preservation item of interest (carried over from the 2018 SHOPP): 03-Glenn-162 PM 76.3/78.6 PPNO 2633 Proj ID 0312000052 EA 3F060. Route 162 at Butte City, from Route 45 to 0.1 mile east of McDougall Street. Replace Sacramento River Bridge No. 11-0017 and viaduct approach, and reconstruct east side roadway to conform with new structure. Programmed in FY20-21, with construction scheduled to start in July 2021. Total project cost is $110,400K, with $88,000K being capital (const and right of way) and $22,400K being support (engineering, environmental, etc.),
(Source: 2020 Approved SHOPP a/o May 2020)

In August 2021, the CTC approved the following construction phase allocation: $98,488,000. 03-Gle-162 76.3/78.6. PPNO 03-2633; ProjID 0312000052; EA 3F060. Route 162 Near Butte City, from Route 45 to 0.4 mile east of McDougall Street.    Outcome/Output: Replace Sacramento River Bridge № 11-0017 and viaduct approach to current standards, and reconstruct east side roadway to conform with new structure. Allocation: CON ENG $10,000,000 CONST $85,000,000. (Future consideration of funding approved under Resolution E-19-49; June 2019.) (Twelve month time extension for CONST and CON ENG approved under Waiver 21-59; June 2021.) (As part of this allocation request, the Department is requesting to extend the completion of the CONST and CON ENG an additional 12 months beyond the 36 month deadline.)
(Source: August 2021 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5b.(1) #12)

NamingNaming

This segment is part of the "Biggs-Willows Road", named by Resolution Chapter 542 in 1919.

Sours: https://www.cahighways.org/ROUTE162.html

California highway 162

Butte 162 Roadway Widening

Project Facts

Description

  • Construct a continuous 12-foot wide two-way left turn lane.
  • Widen shoulders to 8 feet.
  • Create a 20-foot clear recovery zone for vehicles.
  • Replace or extend culverts as needed.
  • Rehabilitate asphalt and replace highway striping.
  • Relocate Utilities.
  • Reconstruct driveways

What We Are Doing

This project will improve safety on State Route 162 between Foothill Boulevard and the Gold Country Casino by providing a two-way left turn, standard 8-feet wide shoulders and a clear recovery zone to reduce traffic collisions.

Funding Breakdown

Total cost: $22.5 million in federal and state funds.

Project Schedule

Project Approval and Environmental Document:  February 2019
Advertise Project:  June 2021
Begin Construction:  Spring 2022
Complete Construction:  Winter 2022

Partnership

none

Project Contacts

Cameron Knudson
Project Manager
(530) 218-1820
[email protected]

Gilbert Mohtes-Chan
Public Information Officer
(530) 741-4571
[email protected]

Sours: https://dot.ca.gov/caltrans-near-me/district-3/d3-projects/d3-butte-162-roadway-widening
California's 395 is the most dangerous highway

Road Trip Planning

Miles KmsItemSummary
0.0
0.0

984 ft.

Junction of State Forest Route #7,
Alder Springs Road/Road 307, just outside the Mendocino National Forest,
3.6
5.8

659 ft.

County Road 306
County Road 306, County Road 305, Community of Chrome, California,
7.3
11.8

725 ft.

Road 306: Elkcreek, CA
Road 306, Sanhedrin Road, Elk Creek, California, a community in Glenn County, California, located south off State Route #162, Stony Gorge Reservoir, Stonyford, California, a small community in Colusa County, California.
7.6
12.2

702 ft.

Road 304: Reservoir
Road 304, runs along the eastern shore of Stony Gorge Reservoir,
12.9
20.7

623 ft.

Cherry Street
Cherry Street, a small loop on State Route #162, Fruto, California, a community in Glenn County, California, located west-northwest of Willows, California, along State Route #162.
19.1
30.7

354 ft.

Road 302/Clarks Valley Road
Road 302/Clarks Valley Road, Stonyford, California,
21.3
34.2

282 ft.

Access: Raceway Park
Access to, Thunderhill Raceway Park, a road racing course located West of Willows, California on State Highway #162. The course is a fast series of twists and turns with minor elevation changes.
27.7
44.6

138 ft.

Intersection
Intersection Interstate Highway #5, at Willows, California, Willows-Glenn County Airport, also known as Willows-Glenn Airport, a public airport located south of Willows, serving Glenn County, California. Glenn county Golf and Country Club, Artois, California, a community in Glenn County, California, in the northern Sacramento Valley of California, lie on the north along Interstate Highway #5.
28.8
46.4

138 ft.

Willows, CA
Highway 99W / S Tehama Street, Willows, California, a town in Glenn County, California. Willows Westside Mall Shopping Center, Glenn Medical Center, Little League Baseball Park, Jensen Park,
38.5
61.9

98 ft.

Junction
Junction State Highway #45, Glenn, California, a community in Glenn County, California, located on the Sacramento River, along State Highway #162. Ordbend, California a small community in Glenn County, California lies along State Route #45 north of State Route #162/45 junction.
43.0
69.2

89 ft.

County Road 61
County Road 61, State Route #45, Community of Codora, California, Upper Butte Basin Wildlife, Packer Lake, Princeton, California, a community in Colusa County, California.
44.8
72.1

92 ft.

Butte City, CA
Butte City, California, Butte City Launch Facility, located on Sacramento River along State Route #162,
51.9
83.6

82 ft.

Goodspeed Watt Road
Goodspeed Watt Road/Aguas Frias Road,
57.9
93.2

102 ft.

Richvale South Highway:
Richvale South Highway, Midway, Richvale, California, a small farming community, in Butte County, California, situated in a primarily agricultural fields, where rice is the common crop.
61.0
98.2

112 ft.

Junction
Junction State Highway #99, on the side of the Thermolito Afterbay, Biggs, California, a city in Butte County, California, Gridley, California, a city in Butte County, California, lie along State Highway #99, south of this junction.
63.0
101.4

125 ft.

Richvale East Road/State Route #99
Richvale East Road, to Richvale, California on the west. State Route #99,
65.1
104.7

167 ft.

Wilbur Road/Larkin Avenue
Wilbur Road, Larkin Avenue, Community of Oroville Junction, California,
67.3
108.3

187 ft.

Larkin Road: Airport
Larkin Road, Oroville Municipal Airport, a public airport located southwest of the city of Oroville, California in Butte County, California, along the State Highway #162, Oroville Wildlife Management Area, Clay Pit SV Recreation Area. 20th Street, on the north connects with Nelson Avenue, on Thermolito Forebay, Lake Oroville State Recreation Area.
68.5
110.2

161 ft.

Thermolito, CA
Wildlife Area Access Road, Oroville Wildlife Management Area, Oroville Wildlife Area, Thermalito, California, a community in Butte County, California,
69.0
111.1

161 ft.

Intersection
Intersection State Highway #70, Community of Oak Grove, California, lies on the south, along State Highway #70. Thermolito Forebay North Picnic Area, lies on the north along State Highway #70, in Lake Oroville State Recreation Area.
70.4
113.3

217 ft.

Lincoln Street: Oroville, CA

70.8
114.0

240 ft.

State Highway #70 Bus.
State Highway #70 Business, Oroville Dam Boulevard E., Barrier Dam on Feather River, The Table Mountain Bridges carry the business route across Feather River, Oroville Hospital.
71.7
115.4

292 ft.

Foothill Boulevard
Foothill Boulevard, Community of Wyondotte, California,
73.6
118.5

489 ft.

Oroville-Quincy Highway
Oroville-Quincy Highway, Oroville East, California, a community in Butte County, California, Parks & Recreation Dept.,
74.5
119.9

712 ft.

Canyon Drive: Dam
Canyon Drive, Oroville Dam, a dam on the Feather River above the city of Oroville, California, in Butte County, California, It is the tallest dam in the United States and is within the top twenty dams in the world for dam height and volume of dam materials. This is a multi-purpose dam, provide water supply, flood control, power generation, and fish and wildlife enhancement.
76.2
122.6

840 ft.

Key Ridge Road: Recreation Area
Key Ridge Road, Miners Ranch Road, Miners Ranch Reservoir, Kelly Ridge Golf Course, Kelly Ridge Recreation Area, Lake Oroville State Recreation Area, situated on and around Lake Oroville, in California, Lake Oroville, a large man-made reservoir lake in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada, located east of the city of Oroville, California. It is created by the Oroville Dam on the Feather River.
77.5
124.7

1234 ft.

Forbestown Road
Forbestown Road, Lake Wyandotte, Community of Hurteton, California.
77.7
125.1

1237 ft.

Loafer Creek Road
Loafer Creek Road, Loafer Creek Recreation Area, on the shores of Lake Oroville,
80.3
129.2

902 ft.

Bidwell Bar Bridge
Bidwell Bar Bridge, a bridge over Lake Oroville, carries State Highway #162 across,
84.3
135.7

928 ft.

Highway Terminus
Oroville-Quincy Highway, at the north eastern shore of Lake Oroville, on the Lake Oroville State Recreation Area, California State Highway #162 ends.


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