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Bridging Tech and Creative Photography

New photographers should check out this Reddit thread filled with priceless advice.

Starting out in photography can be incredibly challenging, and for most people, incredibly overwhelming as well. Once you get past the headache of picking out your first camera and first lens, you have to deal with learning about composition, the exposure triangle, editing, and so much more. Going at it alone can be tough, but thanks to a new thread on Reddit, you can get hints, tips, and some priceless advice on what to avoid doing. If you know some new photographers or you are a new photographer yourself who needs some guidance, join us after the break to find out more about this incredible thread.

The thread, which was started on Reddit on December 3rd, 2019, already has a few hundred comments posted to it by those who want to share their experiences from when they were new photographers. We all know photography is a minefield that can throw you for a loop if you’re not careful, so having a thread like this can help newcomers avoid common mistakes and will be a blessing to many.

After reading through the entire thread, it’s clear there are some great tips here, and there is no doubt that a lot of the responses will help newbies skip some of the common pitfalls new photographers can find themselves in. This response from Brennenslens hits on multiple things many new photographers (heck, even experienced photographers) wonder about; I especially agree with the statement about tripods:

  • You don’t need full-frame, and nearly all the benefits are oversold for the majority of users, especially if you’re just posting drastically compressed JPEGS to Instagram. A Lambo is faster than a Prius, but both of them will get you to the grocery store in the same amount of time

  • Shooting everything wide-open as soon as you get your first fast prime looks silly in many situations

  • Save money for a good tripod you’ll buy once, rather than buying a cheap one that you’ll end up replacing anyway

  • Instagram isn’t for photography and your best work will never get as much attention as some co-ed posting bathroom selfies in a bikini

  • Used gear will save you hundreds

  • Learn your camera until you can operate it in the dark. If you can’t adjust your settings on the fly, practice until you can. Once you can adjust on “autopilot”, you can spend your time worrying about the creative elements involved rather than where that one dial or button is

  • Manual does not equal “professional”

New photographers - Learn about lighting

This response from DJ-EZCheese is excellent too, as learning about light and how you can control it will open up many doors:

“Don’t waste so much time and money chasing fancier cameras and lenses. In most cases the improvements are minimal. Processing skills are important, but understanding light is huge. Start concentrating on lighting as soon as possible.”

If you’re looking for some insight, or if you have anything you would like to share with new photographers and the photography community at large, head to the thread and check it out. Alternatively, share some helpful hints and tips that could help out newcomers in the comment section below.

Sours: https://www.thephoblographer.com/2019/12/10/this-reddit-thread-is-a-must-read-for-new-photographers-everywhere/

The Top 40 Subreddits for Artists, Photographers and Designers

Welcome to the world of Reddit, “the front page of the internet” and an especially influential community hub for artists, photographers, illustrators, and designers.

There’s something for everyone on Reddit, but it’s easy to fall down the wrong rabbit hole. Thankfully, Reddit is divided into sub-communities called subreddits, which make it much easier to navigate its depths.

From the Reddit art world to the realm of Reddit drawing, you can be sure that there’s a subreddit for every imaginable medium (like sketching, sculpture, digital painting) and movement (such as contemporary, modernism, and surrealism).

Some of the most popular subreddits are absolute goldmines. Browsing fellow artists’ work can inspire a surge of creative energy. Or you can leverage the power of shared digital communities—there’s the potential to find new paying clients and network with art industry players.

The most popular subreddits have millions of subscribers and can cover a wide range of topics, or something highly specific. You’ll never run out of subreddits to explore! We’ve rounded up a sampling (in no particular order) of the most popular subreddits for expanding your curiosity, craft, creativity, and brand.

Reddit Art

1. /r/ArtFundamentals

Let’s start with some building blocks. /r/ArtFundamentals is like a fully loaded constructional drawing course—that is absolutely free. It’s a gem for new scribblers and seasoned skechers alike.

The entirety of the comprehensive lesson bank is accessible to anyone on drawabox.com and managed through the subreddit.

Each lesson comes with a minimum amount of homework to complete before moving on, and assignments can be posted to garner feedback from other “students.”

Best for… those looking for structure and feedback while brushing up on some core drawing skills.

2. /r/Art

Reddit art is the main art subreddit: it’s a massive go-to hub for rubbing shoulders with artists and art-lovers.

With over 13 million (!) subscribers, it’s easily one of the top subreddits for the creative community looking to connect, talk technique, and swap industry news and information. (The majority of threads, however, are people sharing their favorite pieces of art or their own work, so your mileage may vary.)

Just as art can be defined in endless ways, this expansive subreddit can seem a bit… all-encompassing.

Best for… artists who enjoy browsing through a variety of content before narrowing down their focus.

3. /r/Sketchpad

On the one hand, it can be hard to motivate yourself to make art without anyone holding you accountable. On the other hand, you might not feel comfortable sharing every rough draft with your friends, peers, or colleagues, either.

The perfect solution is the Reddit drawing community /r/Sketchpad, a smaller subreddit for sharing unfinished drafts with a crowd of other artists on the internet. Users post individual works-in-progress, offer a tour of their recently completed sketchbooks, and swap drawing feedback (if it’s requested).

While not one of the most popular subreddits based on post frequency (expect two to five new posts a week), it’s a great forum to get more comfortable with sharing your process.

Plus, there’s something undeniably fun and stimulating about perusing the contents of a stranger’s sketchbook.

Best for… getting over perfectionism and back into a daily drawing routine; overcoming the fear of starting that crisp new Moleskine sketchbook.

4. /r/ArtStore

Think of a huge marketplace or bazaar that’s easy to navigate and doesn’t charge a fee to rent a space or table. /r/ArtStore is a subreddit for artists looking to link to their websites, sell original art, and connect with new clients interested in commissioning pieces.

We’re not just talking fine art, either. Art fans are hunting for everything from paintings to photography, illustrations to design, crafts, and more.

Best for… artists actively seeking a fresh way to reach new eyes, have pieces ready to sell, and are open to freelance commissions; quitting Etsy cold-turkey.

5. /r/ArtTools

The perfect venue to geek out about your favorite paintbrushes or alert the community to a sale oil paints, the /r/ArtTools subreddit is all about art supplies and materials. Covering a wide swath of disciplines from ceramics to illustration, there’s a little something for everyone to appreciate.

Need a bulk canvas supplier? Looking for the optimal way to store your oil pastels? This subreddit is also open to specific supply-related questions, suggestions, and product reviews.

Best for… that burning art supply question you have at 3am; giving your non-artist friends a break when they’re sick of you talking about the new type of pen you just discovered.

6. /r/ArtCrit

Reddit art forums like /r/ArtCrit are the perfect community outlet for developing a critical vocabulary, practicing giving and receiving constructive feedback, and just generally getting more comfortable with putting your work out there.

Plus, allowing your work to be discussed by Reddit’s online community can offer some critical distance to help ensure more honest assessments. Discourse is always civil and productive.

Best for… artists who are in need of honest feedback from their peers or want to see their work with new eyes; artists who miss their MFA workshops and critiques.

7. /r/ArtBuddy

If you’re looking for a more consistent and ongoing feedback dynamic, /r/ArtBuddy is the right corner of the internet for you. To get started, post a “Buddy Wanted” thread and fill out the suggested questionnaire.

This way, artists seeking buddies can gauge your goals, what medium you’re working in, how often you’d like to share work, and more.

Best for… artists who have hit a wall, feel isolated in their art practice, need consistent encouragement or support; folks who have the time and energy to dedicate to a mutually beneficial mentoring relationship.

8. /r/ConceptArt

For the those interested in getting into film, TV, and video games, or for already-established concept artists working in the entertainment industry, /r/ConceptArt is the spot to be.

Expanding daily as far as top subreddits go, this community is an excellent way to get a feel for the booming concept art industry, as well as brush up on your skills with tips, tricks, news, videos, and tutorials.

If you’re looking for some solid learning, head over to sister subreddit /r/LearnConceptArt.

Best for… learning about the concept art industry, keeping abreast of relevant news, expanding your imagination, and testing your vision; if you’ve ever left a sci-fi movie thinking “I could have came up with cooler aliens”; those who get distracted by the beautiful landscapes in Skyrim.

9. /r/ ComputerGraphics

The name might conjure a variety of things, but rest assured that this subreddit is for anyone into digital art in all its forms—from 3D modeling to 2D painting. Since it covers a lot of ground, this popular subreddit is very active.

You can expect new posts daily with upwards of 12,000 community members.

Best for… connecting with others who consider their computer an essential art-making tool; Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator aficionados.

10. /r/ArtDocumentaries

If you’re looking to entertain and enrich yourself off of Reddit—perhaps with some fellow art lovers over a glass of wine—/r/ArtDocumentaries is the perfect resource.

Users post links and direct browsers to a wide variety of art documentaries that cover (you guessed it!) every imaginable medium and movement.

Best for… merging your love of art history with your love of film; impressing your Tinder date.

Reddit Photography

11. /r/Pics

A hugely popular subreddit in the realm of Reddit photography with over 19 million subscribers, /r/pics is a great place to share and browse pics.

While there are some restrictions on what can be posted, all skill levels are welcome and many reddit users simply post interesting shots they find online (with proper crediting). It’s a bit of a mixed bag.

Best for… visual inspiration to jumpstart your brain.

12. /r/Photography

The mighty and comprehensive /r/Photography is one of the most popular subreddits for photographers from all walks of life. And unlike its large and more generalized counterpart /r/Art (scroll back up to Reddit Art for a refresher), it’s not as overwhelming—even for newbies.

That’s because /r/Photography is not a place for posting photos (like /r/pics). Instead it’s a useful platform for discussing the craft—everything from networking with other photographers on social media to newbie Q&As and more advanced technical discussions.

Best for… photographers at every level looking to disseminate information, ask questions, and learn from their peers.

13. /r/AskPhotography

Though most subreddits featured on this list will entertain questions from community members at all levels and competencies, if you feel more comfortable asking for help in a forum designed specifically for curious photographers… this is the subreddit for you!

Best for… photographers more interested in asking specific, clearly articulated questions rather than community-building or sharing work.

14. /r/PhotoMarket

Calling all gearheads and equipment obsessives! The Reddit photography community isn’t just about swapping information and pics—you can buy, sell, and trade all types of photo-related hardware as well.

Hailed as “Reddit’s camera store,” this subreddit features best practices for completing successful transactions and an up-to-date scammer list.

Best for… thrifty photographers on a budget or shooters searching for hard-to-find gear; people who get a thrill out of acquiring rare gems secondhand.

15. /r/PhotoClass

Reddit photography has its own class—and it’s always in session! The /r/PhotoClass subreddit (which can also be found at at r-photoclass.com) is a free photography primer. It’s divided into five parts, with a total of 29 comprehensive, easy-to-follow lessons and assignments.

Best for… beginners looking to learn foundational photography skills at their own pace; self-starters on a budget.

16. /r/Cameras

It’s not just about having a camera—it’s about having the right camera.

This popular subreddit is tailored to the essential tool of the trade, providing an outlet for camera reviews, discussions, articles, questions, and more.

You can connect with over 28,000 camera enthusiasts as they ruminate on the question of brand comparisons, lenses, gear, accessories, and more.

Best for… talented creatives who have the eye for photography but might lack the technical know-how to navigate the world of gear and accessories.

17. /r/AnalogPhotography

Some photographers yearn for a return to a time before digital took over. There’s just something special about a roll of actual film.

Those who prefer analog photography can share their passion in this popular subreddit forum. It’s extremely organized, and the photographs shared are often top-notch. There are weekly and monthly recurring threads for self-promotion.

Best for… pros already working with analog film or those looking to dabble; old souls.

18. /r/Darkroom

If you’re going analog, it only makes sense that you’d need to know your way around a darkroom.

This active, niche subreddit has over 4,000 users and prioritizes sharing and discussing darkroom processes over the final product (though you can find some incredible prints, too!).

Best for… photographers looking to learn from seasoned darkroom aficionados; sharing your learning process even if the resulting photograph is imperfect.

19. /r/Lightroom

On the other end of the spectrum, photography Reddit also caters to the digital-minded among us, with subreddits dedicated solely to the ins and outs of post-processing in Adobe Lightroom.

Best for… photographers already familiar with Creative Cloud; people whose only time in a darkroom is when they’re hunched over their laptop editing photos at 3 am.

20. /r/PhotoCritique

Another essential feedback subreddit, /r/PhotoCritique is a large community of over 26,000 users collaborating to improve each other’s photographic work through peer critique.

Welcoming posts from newbies and seasoned pros alike, user feedback is typically quick, respectful, honest, and constructive. If you’re not quite ready to post one of your own photographs for critique, simply browsing people’s shots and reading the suggestions of others can be a wonderful education all its own.

Best for… when you’re craving the honest input of your peers.

21. /r/ITookAPicture

This popular subreddit—with over 80,000 reddit users—is perfect for photographers simply looking for an outlet to simply post their photographs and browse the work of others.

Unlike the /r/pics subreddit, photographers exclusively post shots they’ve taken themselves that demonstrate a particular technique, style, or aesthetic. It’s less of a mixed bag.

Best for… photographers who need an audience to motivate them to continue shooting and sharing.

22. /r/PostProcessing

Colorists and retouchers and photographers, oh my! Sometimes the real magic happens after the photo is already snapped. Fans of the /r/Lightroom subreddit can happily lurk here if they’re using other photo editing software for their post processing needs.

With close to 54,000 users, this is a great Reddit photography platform for submitting raw photos for suggestions and feedback, as well posting questions, software comparisons, and helpful tips and tricks.

Best for… photographers interested in tweaking mood, composition, and color with post processing software.

23. /r/PictureChallenge

A super fun subreddit, /r/PictureChallenge provides a different community challenge for photographers every week.

With hundreds of challenges all conveniently archived, there’s enough material to keep any photographer inspired for a long time.

Best for… photographers seeking to get out of their comfort zones and switch up their typical subjects; folks who love a good challenge and some friendly competition.

24. /r/ExposurePorn

Let there be light! This subreddit features over 309,000 self-proclaimed long-exposure addicts posting various visual delights. (So, not as NSFW as it sounds.)

A mix of original photography and found gems, users still provide sufficient context for their finds (resolution, title, and more for each photograph).

Best for… sharing your love of long-exposure photography; gaining inspo from fellow long-exposure addicts.

Reddit Illustration

25. /r/Illustration

There’s no better place to start in the world of Reddit illustration than the aptly titled /r/Illustration subreddit. A community for cartoons, comics, children’s books, caricatures, and more, this is a great forum to connect with likeminded artists working in your specific genre—or experience something totally new.

Asking for and providing feedback is welcome, as is posting works-in-progress and published pieces.

Best for… learning more about various niches in the world of illustration; generously providing feedback, sharing tips and tricks, or discussing industry news.

26. /r/RedditGetsDrawn

One of the coolest and most unique corners of the Reddit drawing community is /r/RedditGetsDrawn: a place where folks who want to be drawn link up with artists and illustrators with the talent to make it happen.

It’s a perfect swap situation for illustrators looking for new subjects and individuals who want to give themselves (or lucky friends, family members, and loved ones) a special gift.

With over 350,000 subscribers, it’s also one of the top subreddits of its kind.

Best for… improving your illustration skills and making someone’s day; marvelling at how the same photograph can be interpreted in so many different ways.

27. /r/ArtProgressPics

Practice makes perfect. This subreddit embodies this old adage perfectly. All progress is good progress as over 3,000 subscribers show community members how their work has changed and improved over time, whether it’s over the span of a single day or a few years.

Best for… getting inspired and motivating yourself to track your development as an artist; wowing others with your killer before and after shots.

28. /r/PixelArt

What is pixel art? Also referred to as 8-bit art, this throwback style uses computer pixels as building blocks to create pieces with a cool retro effect.

A supportive community for pixel enthusiasts to share and network, there’s also a great list of resources that features a guide for newbies, a practical tutorial, a list of must-use software, and a thread for pixel artists looking for work opportunities.

Best for… pixel artists and enthusiasts looking to get started, network, and find work; artists who enjoy mosaics or pointillist paintings but want to trade in their palettes for computer programs.

29. /r/SpecArt

Boasting over 227,000 subscribers, Reddit illustration aficionados and sci-fi/fantasy buffs alike flock to /r/SpecArt for their daily dose of fantastical words and landscapes.

Speculative artists from every realm (illustration, sculpture, drawing, computer art, and everything in between) are welcome to post their own creations and geek out with others.

Best for… networking with other speculative artists and lovers of genre-specific creations; if you love lurking DeviantArt.

30. /r/Comics

Comics fans and comic artists are a die-hard breed and nearly one million of them gather in /r/Comics, easily one of the top subreddits on this list. From print comics to web comics, all are welcome.

The playing field is quite level and comic artists at all skill levels are welcome as well.

Best for… posting work, discovering new comics, and sharing news about film and TV adaptations based on comics; generating some buzz for a comic project you’re ready to share or promote.

31. /r/ArtistsLounge

Kick back and relax with fellow artists in a laidback online environment. This discussion-based subreddit welcomes all forms of art including illustration, photography, painting, 3D sculpting, and more.

A quick scan of current threads on /r/ArtistsLounge include discussions on how to deal with friends who want “free art,” where to find a set of natural hair brushes, and cures for achy hands and wrists.

But remember: this is not the appropriate place to post or attempt to sell your own artwork.

Best for… stimulating discussions, debates, and practical information from other artists in your field.

Reddit Design

32. /r/Design

A great aesthetic hub to tap into, this is one of the most popular subreddits for all things design-related. The threads found within might span a wide variety of topics—from logos to branding to posters and beyond—but content is usually high-quality and the discussions are fruitful.

Clearly articulated rules also help keep this large subreddit from getting too unruly.

**Best for…**someone who is interested in many different elements of design and doesn’t feel the need to narrow things down quite yet.

33. /r/WebDesign

For designers on the internet, the large and lively /r/WebDesign community is a great spot for web designers and developers to swap resources and ask each other more nitty-gritty questions about data filters, coding, landing pages, and more.

With nearly 330,000 subscribers, newbies and pro web designers lurk threads asking and answering questions.The updated FAQ page and clear guidelines are a real time-saver. Thanks to weekly discussions (Friday community design critiques), get ready to grow!

Best for… an intro into the thriving web design industry and community; web designers looking to bond in coding language!

34. /r/Design_Critiques

Need a second opinion (or 12) on your design portfolio? Something just not clicking with a recent design project?

/r/Design_Critiques is one of the top subreddits for community design feedback. Product branding, logos, graphic design, website help—it’s all fair game! Though most Reddit art forums are open to questions in some form, this is the subreddit to flock to if you’re looking more meaningful insights on something specific.

Best for… designers looking for constructive criticism on specific projects.

35. /r/Graphic_Design

Incredibly popular as far as top subreddits for design go, over 280,000 graphic designers frequent this online community forum. You can find news and inspiration on illustration, logos, print work, making a living freelancing, and design software.

An organized and well-moderated subreddit, it’s easy to navigate and also handily links to a slew of other related design subreddits!

Best for… graphic designers looking to network with other professionals and share resources.

36. /r/Typography

A subreddit exclusively for typophiles! They say good design is invisible (and bad fonts can stick out like a sore thumb), but that doesn’t mean that designers don’t see typography they love and want to share and discuss.

This subreddit is a wonderful resource for celebrating the often-unsung art of typesetting and glyph design. If you’re looking to identify a particular font, try /r/IdentifyThisFont.

Best for… anyone who’s actually ever referred to themselves as a typophile; if you’re the one always ID-ing fonts for your friends.

37. /r/TalesFromDesigners

Take a load off and dig in to the trials and tribulations shared in this hilarious and cringeworthy subreddit. From ridiculous requests and unrealistic expectations to rude clients and wacky screw-ups, /r/TalesFromDesigners will help you feel a sense of camaraderie with your fellow designers. We’ve all been there!

Clients and businesses are kept anonymous to protect guilty parties and keep it ethical.

Best for… making light of stressful or ridiculously comedic design-related situations; venting to other professionals in your field who just get it; feeling less bad about procrastinating by falling down a design-related rabbit hole.

38. /r/LogoDesign

Logos are ubiquitous—they can make or break a brand. The 52,000-plus members of this subreddit focused on logo design understand this better than most. From branding faux-pas to running commentary on redesigned logos, there’s a lot of valuable content for designers and aesthetic appreciators of all kinds.

If you’re specifically looking for feedback on a logo design, try the /r/logo_critique subreddit.

Best for… designers looking to hone their logo design skills to gain new clients; BBNs: Big Branding Nerds.

39. /r/Visualization

The savvy /r/Visualization forum is one of the most popular subreddits that blends business strategy, information, and design.

The community of over 27,000 is a resource for instructional guides, tutorials, sharing works-in-progress, and general discussions about information visualization.

Best for… designers, brand leaders, and entrepreneurs looking to transform how information is conveyed to make a stronger visual impact; people who can’t resist a good pie chart or graph.

40. /r/DesignThought

Imagine if Aristotle were a designer. What kind of musings would he have on his process and craft? Think of this forum as a venue that welcomes deep thought and rumination on both the business side and the professional side of the design industry.

Best for… designers looking for discussion threads that prioritize quality over quantity.

Here’s a philosophy for you: when it comes to Reddit art, Reddit photography, and Reddit illustration, subscribe widely! It’s a great (and free) way to take learning and community-building into your own hands and gain an edge in your industry. Happy Reddit-ing!

Want to hear about other ways to connect with fellow artists and potential clientele? Read these:
10 Social Media Marketing Secrets You Need to Get More Clients
How to Use Tinder to Get Freelance Work
Get Published: 38 Websites to Submit Your Work

Sours: https://www.format.com/magazine/resources/art/top-subreddits-art-design
  1. Amazon jobs home based
  2. Fidelity portfolio
  3. Nightmare balloon boy
  4. Logo parody stickers

Reddit reviews: The best digital cameras

u/MegsHusband16 · 1 pointr/Cameras

I fell in love with photography the exact same way! Started with my first iPhone which was a 5s and I was in love hah! Eventually decided to buy a canon rebel T3i. A few photographer friends of mine all suggested this camera and it was a GOOD buy! I had it for at least a year before I upgraded to a canon 7D. To this day I still use the T3i alongside my 7D.
Though the T3i is a discontinued camera you can sill buy it on amazon or eBay for pretty cheap along with a kit lens that will be enough to get you started.

I STRONGLY recommend buying something used! Especially for your first camera. Cameras and lenses hold their value and quality for YEARS so there is usually no worry when buying a body used in good quality. Both my T3i and 7D, along with almost all my lenses including my L series lens I got all used! No problems whatsoever.
This is a Canon Rebel T5i it’s an upgraded version from the T3i, which is discontinued and pretty old at this point. The T5i will be a GREAT starter camera! It’s a little out of your budget brand new but scroll down and click USED to see many other used options all within your budget. Select one that’s “very good” or “like new” and you’ll have no problem! Along with the 18-55mm kit lens that comes with you’ll want to purchase one more lens.. the Canon 50mm f1.8 aka ‘nifty fifty’. This is the suggested first lens purchase by thousands. Literally ask a thousand photographers what’s the first lens you should buy and that’s what they’ll tell you the nifty fifty! And it’s only $125 brand new! (The only lens I’ve bought new), though you can get it cheaper for used.

This is a phenomenal professional grade starter DSLR that will last you years! And I promise oh won’t be disappointed with it.

Finally you’ll want to invest in an Adobe Lightroom subscription. For $10/Mo you can get both Lightroom and Photoshop. Lightroom will be your hub for organizing photos as well as editing them. The program is super powerful and can be a bit tedious to learn, but follow some YouTube videos and tutorials like some from Anthony Morganti and you will learn quick! I’ve watched almost all of his videos (there’s hundreds) and every video I learn something new!

Best of luck to you and I’m excited for you to get started in such a great hobby!


edit: oh BTW! Once you get a DSLR you will have total control over all settings in your camera, which you probably didn’t have before on your phone. So the first step with a DSLR is learning how Aperture, Shutter Speed, and ISO interact with each other. This is how you can get those awesome short depth of field shots you mentioned with the background blurry and bokeh’d. this is a great video to help understand the “focus triangle” and learn how those 3 settings interact with each other! That’s also another great tutorial YouTube channel so I suggest subscribing to them and watching some other of their videos as well.

another edit: btw the 750D you mentioned is a newer version of the T5i. 750D is called the T6i in America, also another great option! I didn’t suggest it because it’s a bit out of tour budget but again I’m sure you can find it used in your budget! If the T6i fits your budget then definitely opt for that option as it’s newer and has a few more features upgraded features, but the T5i is great as well!

u/Liquid_Fire_YT · 2 pointsr/Filmmakers

I'll let someone with more experience in those matters answer the first 2 questions, but I think I can really help you with the third question.

If you don't yet have a camera, I would recommend getting one and spending a few weeks getting really familiar with the manual controls and the exposure triangle. Start by filming everything in sight (Nature, People, Cars going by on the road, etc.) and also watching tons of tutorials about exposure / framing / editing / color grading / etc. on Youtube before attempting to shoot anything with a narrative. This is just my personal opinion, and I'm sure some people will disagree with me, but I've found that process worked for me to get the basics down rock solid so when I wanted to shoot my first 2 minute no budget short film with a narrative, I had a much better idea about what to do with Audio / Lights / Framing and was able to pull it off much better because I knew what I was capable of with the Camera. This is just my 2 cents, feel free to jump head first into making a short film first if that's what you are set on.

Here are a few good tutorial videos:

Exposure:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8T94sdiNjc
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YAt4315-uH4

Lighting:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j_Sov3xmgwg
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XqeCHzk2RdA
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NVIbirzZn0M

Recording Audio:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UAb-hV2uBj4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S9cP1WHL0Zo

There are plenty of other amazing tutorials on youtube and all over the internet. If you have any questions about filmmaking, chances are there is a detailed youtube video explaining it.

As for the Camera itself, I would highly, HIGHLY recommend the Panasonic G7 Mirrorless camera. You can find it here on Amazon:
https://www.amazon.com/PANASONIC-Mirrorless-14-42mm-Megapixels-DMC-G7KK/dp/B00X409PQS/

I currently use it as a beater camera to shoot Youtube with, but that doesn't mean it's a bad camera at all. It's actually a really amazing little device. It is an amazingly sharp and versatile little camera that packs way more punch than a camera of its size should be able to. It shoots extremely crisp 4K video at 100Mbps, and the little lens it comes with is amazing for an included kit lens. Even if you don't have a 4K monitor or plan on delivering content in 4K, it still really helps due to the increased bitrate of the files and the increased clarity and sharpness of 4K video, so when you downsize it to 1080p, it can look really, really good.

Here is the pansonic G7 operating at its very best:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sf4skunfRv4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_cXwpckBMBg
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5jHsXSV-FCk


I would probably recommend not getting a consumer camcorder like the one you posted, due to its fixed non removable lens and possible lack of critical manual controls, but I've never used that camera so I can't speak more than that. In my opinion it would be better to go for a real DSLR or Mirrorless camera for film making instead of a consumer camcorder. I haven't used any of the Canon DSLR cameras for filmmaking, but I'm sure any highly rated ones on Amazon or BHPhotoVideo are just fine.

u/circlenone · 1 pointr/photography

Hello /r/photography !

First time poster here. I'm sure you guys get a lot of posts like these here, so sorry for that. I'm very seriously considering purchasing my first camera over the holiday season, perhaps like a Christmas present to myself. I've always been interested in photography, took a few classes in HS/college, but I've never actually owned a camera before.

I'm actually a retail associate at a store with a sizable DI department and I've found myself hanging around there checking out some cameras and lenses during my lunch breaks recently. I've been doing what research and reading I can but as a potential new photographer its a bit overwhelming to start. Even some of the menus and settings on the DSLRs are confusing.

Anyway. Right now I'm eyeing the Sony a6000 as my gateway into the world of photography. I've picked up and held most of the cameras in our shop and I definitely appreciate the smaller compact design of a mirrorless versus the traditional DSLRs. I'm sure I would be fine with a DSLR and in the end the lenses will be the same size but I would prefer a mirrorless, I think. At this point, my major reservation with the a6000 is what I've read about the E mount lens selection being quite small.

From what I understand Sony is still adding to this lineup but there is a much smaller selection of compatible or native lenses for the E mount series compared to, say, Canon or Nikon. I'm wondering if this might be a reason to consider going with a different camera. I checked out the EOS M3 as well, which I believe is a similar price/specs to the a6000 but I think I would prefer to have the EVF the Sony has. However, I'm assuming the M3 has a much larger selection of compatible lenses.

For what its worth, we have a bundle similar to this in my store https://www.amazon.com/Sony-ILCE6000YB-Mirrorless-Digital-55-210mm/dp/B00NO1T55I which also includes a 50mm prime (I believe its this one https://www.amazon.com/Sony-50mm-Mid-Range-Mount-Cameras/dp/B005NX7HY6 ) open boxed for $599 on the tag, and could possibly get it cheaper. I'm not sure if an open box item qualifies (I would have to ask) but I do also have access to Sony's Premier Rewards program which I could get up to a 40% rebate on the a6000.

However, for the sake of finding some alternatives to look into, lets say my budget is about.. $700 USD before taxes. Could possibly flex it to $800. I can probably get similar accomodations on most brand of cameras and lenses that my store carries. For me, this would be a very large purchase and I want to make sure I get the best fit and I would probably be using this camera for at least 5 years and adding lenses/accessories as I go.

What are some good alternatives to the a6000 in this price range? I'd prefer mirrorless if possible but I'm not totally opposed to a standard DSLR. I like the manual controls (was considering a5100 originally) on the a6000 even though I don't know what most of them do. Prefer to have a viewfinder. APS-C sensor.. not convinced on m43.

My endgoal is to be shooting macro but at this time I don't think I can afford the investment into a 90 or 100mm macro lens as a total beginner photographer. Mostly interested in doing flowers/mushrooms and inanimate objects but being able to shoot small creatures would be cool. Was considering tubes or maybe a reversal ring in the meantime. Also interested in general nature/city photography.

Any suggestions you guys might have would be great. So far the a6000 seems like the best fit for me but I want to explore all my options before making any purchase. Sorry for the long post. Cheers!

u/brunerww · 3 pointsr/videography

Hi /u/businesstwinkie - I started out with a T2i and now shoot with the GH4 and a Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera (BMPCC). I have never shot with the Blackmagic Cinema Camera, so my advice is based on my experience with the BMPCC.

I love both cameras, but which camera you buy depends on what you want to do with it.

If you shoot narrative, corporate videos, commercials or music videos in controlled settings, want the widest possible dynamic range and want to be able to maximize your artistic choices in post-production - you should seriously consider one of the Blackmagic cameras. In terms of value for money, the [$495 (on sale until 8/31) Pocket Cinema Camera] (http://www.adorama.com/BMCCP.html?KBID=66297) is the best deal out there right now.

During production with the Pocket Cinema Camera, you will adjust shutter angles instead of shutter speeds. Still photographers talk shutter speeds, cinematographers talk shutter angle.

With the BMPCC, you will also be free of the mirror, which adds unnecessary weight, bulk and complexity - and is not something you have to deal with on a cinema camera.

Plus, post production with 12-bit 4:4:4 CinemaDNG RAW is pretty good training for working with 12-bit ArriRAW or RED RAW - much better than trying to work with 8-bit 4:2:0 h.264, which pretty much turns to mush if you try to grade it or lift the shadows.

This camera can produce images that look like this:

NARRATIVE: http://vimeo.com/89563847

CORPORATE: http://vimeo.com/88080785

COMMERCIALS:

http://vimeo.com/95962309

http://vimeo.com/81148562

MUSIC VIDEO: http://vimeo.com/88103618

There are many more examples on the Pocket Cinema Camera group I moderate over on Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/groups/pocketcamera/

All of that said, if you shoot run and gun verite, docs, weddings, news, home movies, still photos - or anything else that requires fast setups - a Blackmagic camera may not be the best option.

Although, the [$1697.99 (as of this post) GH4] (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00I9GYG8O/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B00I9GYG8O&linkCode=as2&tag=battleforthew-20) is more expensive, I love this camera for anything that requires a fast setup. The tools that Panasonic has provided with this machine are terrific for just pulling the camera out of the bag, turning it on and getting a high quality 4K shot.

In addition to 4K, its fast & accurate video autofocus, 1080/96p slow motion and power zoom lens compatibility make this camera a joy to shoot with.

Here is what this camera can do:

SLOW MOTION/ANAMORPHIC: http://vimeo.com/97096167

CORPORATE: http://vimeo.com/99689267

COMMERCIAL: http://vimeo.com/100539875

You can find many more examples on the GH4K group I moderate over on Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/groups/gh4k

Yes, you'll learn a whole more about grading, shutter angles and bare bones shooting with a Blackmagic camera - but you'll have a much easier time on the set with the Panasonic.

Bottom line for me: I have a BMPCC and several Panasonic GH cameras, but unless I really need 10-bit video for grading, the BMPCC sits on the shelf while I take one of the Panasonics pretty much everywhere I go.

At the end of the day, it depends on what you want - the camera that is easiest to use - or the camera that gives you the widest dynamic range and the greatest flexibility in the editing suite.

Hope this is helpful!

Bill

u/HybridCamRev · 2 pointsr/videography

Hi /u/Noray - I shoot with the GH4 and the BMPCC and they are both great doc cameras - but neither is very good in low light - nor do they have IBIS. For documentary cameras below $2000, the two best options are:

Option One

if budget permits, the [new Panasonic GH5 ($1997.99 - shipping in March)] (https://www.amazon.com/Panasonic-DC-GH5KBODY-Mirrorless-Camera-Bluetooth/dp/B01MZ3LQQ5//ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ll1&tag=battleforthew-20) may be what you're looking for. It would be a better travel, interview and documentary camera than any of the alternatives on your list.

This camera outperforms the GH4 (or the G85) in low light - plus it has IBIS (a feature the GH4 lacks).

The GH5 also records internally to a highly gradable 10-bit 4:2:2 codec that will give you more freedom in post than the other cameras on your list (except the BMPCC) - and it has manual controls for ISO, white balance, +/- exposure and 5 programmable function buttons for aperture, shutter or any other function you would like.

With a [$94.99 Nikon G to micro 4/3 focal/reducer adapter] (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00CDBZ7AW//ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ll1&tag=battleforthew-20), you can use your 18-55 kit lens while you save up for better glass.

Here are a few examples of what it can do from pre-production cameras:

  • [Panasonic LUMIX GH5 4K 60P Video "HAND-CUT" by Griffin Hammond] (https://youtu.be/BoYbqSxPWrA) (2160p)

  • [Lumix Gh5 Test Film - The Winter Balance by Leftcoast Media House] (https://youtu.be/T81cdoYJyEw) (2160p)

  • [Panasonic GH5 Test: Wooden Niccolls with DDG by TheCameraStoreTV] (https://youtu.be/gPTCrXbIbh4) (2160p)

    Slow Motion

  • [Panasonic GH5 Slow Motion 4K Video First Look (No Colour Grading) by HundredFold Productions] (https://youtu.be/tXFAc6Kufsg) (2160p)

  • [Panasonic Lumix GH5 180fps 1080p Test by Steven Clarey] (https://youtu.be/AKjXBxXfR0o) (1080p)

  • [180fps | Panasonic Lumix GH5: "Bored" by Neumannfilms] (https://youtu.be/tB2o6H-AfjM) (1080p - suggest you turn the annoying soundtrack off)

  • [180fps slow motion on the Panasonic GH5 by Griffin Hammond] (https://youtu.be/5b5Nvm12-NI) (1080p)

    Here are a few examples of 20MP still image quality from this camera: https://www.flickr.com/photos/camerajabber/albums/72157677373675970

    In my view, the GH5 will be the best filmmaking/videography/still camera you can buy below $2000.

    Option Two

    Although it is an 8-bit camera and lacks the GH5's external controls, the second best still/video camera below $2000 is the [$1398 4K/24.2MP Sony A6500] (https://www.amazon.com/Sony-Alpha-Digital-Camera-2-95-Inch/dp/B01M586Y9R//ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ll1&tag=battleforthew-20).

    With its APS-C sized sensor (similar to your Nikon's), 5-axis internal image stabilization and 1080/120p slow motion, it will give you image quality that looks like this:

  • [[Tập 6] Việt Nam trong mắt tôi | Cảnh đẹp sông nước Miền Tây qua góc máy ảnh Sony Alpha A6500 [4K] by Sony Vietnam] (https://youtu.be/hIdZpJUXBnY) (2160p)

  • [Pottery - Sony a6500 Sample Footage by JR Videos] (https://youtu.be/pvOEcZCQjbk) (2160p)

  • [Someone To Stay by Into The Mountain Productions] (https://vimeo.com/195120183) (1080p)

    Slow Motion

  • [STARVED ROCK| Sony A6500 at 120fps by Manny Ortiz] (https://youtu.be/4RK8QGtK9Ls?t=26s)

  • [Sony a6500 Slow Motion 120fps with Ronin m3 gimbal in Oahu, Hawaii by BadPanda Pictures] (https://youtu.be/8QQy9LC42p4)

  • [SONY A6500 | SIGMA 18-35 | SLOW MOTION | TEST by Patryk Feler] (https://youtu.be/qKNqXRRbUAk)

  • [sony a6500 + ronin m gimbal and zeiss 55 f1.8 AF tracking test at 120fps by Jakob Brenk] (https://vimeo.com/196231893) (1080p)

    It's a pretty good 24.2MP still camera too: https://www.flickr.com/groups/[email protected]/pool

    The GH5 can't match the resolution of the A6500's still images - nor the bokeh from the A6500's larger sensor (at equivalent apertures and focal lengths).

    The [A6500 is also lighter and more compact than the GH5] (http://camerasize.com/compare/#698,691), if that is important to you. Plus, it is available now.

    Both the GH5 and the A6500 are terrific, in-body stabilized video cameras - and either would be a significant upgrade over your D3300.

    Hope this is helpful and good luck finding the right camera for your needs!




u/[deleted] · 2 pointsr/teenagers

Hey man, last I checked I was the only videographer here so feel free to ask me anything and everything you need to know about videography and also feel free to pm me if you want to see some of my work.

it's very hard to give you a good recommendation for what camera you want with this little information. Mostly because I can recommend you a crappy camera or a good camera or a really good and the price will be the main determining factor. Right off the bat, I can recommend the Panasonic G7 for you as it currently stands as the best bang for your buck video camera out there. (Bummer, just checked and it's not on sale rn, best price is $300 cheaper, $200 cheaper is really common) However, there certainly could be reasons for you to not get the G7, but you would need to elaborate for me to know. Things like brand preference, current knowledge, budget, ease of use wanted, and a whole bunch more things. I will tell you that if you live in the US, Amazon.com or B&H Photo are your best options for buying gear.

Lights really depend on where you're shooting, but it would make things way easier just to not deal with them yet. If needed for artistic ways, you could just use an iphone light or normal flashlight.

The proper term is lav mic, lavalier mic, or lapel mic. They look like this and you should keep in mind that some people don't like the look of a lav mic in the video. There's two types, wired and wireless. Wireless costs like $400+ for just one. Wired ones mean that you either need to plug it into your phone, an audio recorder, or the camera. imo you'll probably want to go with an on camera mic like most youtubers do, but you're gonna need to elaborate on what videos you're making and how you're gonna use your camera.

Green screen is good and easy, the key comes to using the footage properly. In order to fully utilize a green screen's capabilities, you will want to learn how to do chroma keying in Adobe After Effects like I've done in one of my videos. None the less, you can still use a green screen the easy way with iMovie, FCPX, or Premiere.

The only other thing I can currently think of would be a tripod, which you in theory can totally get away with just using a cheap ass $20 tripod, but it won't be the most secure thing and you'll definitely not want to use it to pan or tilt. (You should learn those terms too, just cuz)

If you have an questions, feel free to hmu.

u/BAStartGaming · 5 pointsr/letsplay

Hey Crimson! I have a pretty good amount of experience with camera work for my gaming videos!


I'm not sure what your budget looks like, so I'll start with the cheapest solutions first.


I would suggest the most easily obtainable camera for live action stuff would be just to simply use your smart phone! For example, the iPhone camera shoots with a Sony CMOS sensor in full HD! Just make sure you stabilize it on a tripod or flat surface because the auto image stabilizer is pretty terrible at times. Secondly, if you do choose this option, I would highly recommend using a different audio source. Smart phones traditionally don't always have the best audio recorders on board.


A web cam is probably your second best solution! Full HD cams can run about 50-100 bucks, but they usually get the job done. Though again, with all these recommendations, I'd suggest you use an alternative microphone for audio.


If your not willing to use cheaper alternatives like a smart phone or a webcam, then I think your best bet would be the GoPro. These products are massively popular for a reason; they can provide BEAUTIFUL footage if used correctly. You can probably find one of these bad boys USED for under 200 on craigslist. For the relatively small price tag, this is one of the best all purpose cameras on the market.


Finally, if you have a decent budget at your disposal, I'd suggest the T3i. If you only plan on using this camera for rare occasions, then I'd advise against purchasing it. However, if your hoping your channel would rely heavily on live action content, then this is it. This is your solution! It might end up running you a little over 500 bucks, but this is the camera a majority of youtube creators have been using. There is a slight learning curve, but when you get the hang of it, your videos will look fantastic.


Like I said though, never use the on board audio recorders these solutions provide for you. Buy a separate microphone if quality is a big concern for you in your videos!

u/frostickle · 2 pointsr/photography

I would have recommend the GF1 with 20mm f1.7 lens.

It is the reason for this: http://blog.okcupid.com/index.php/dont-be-ugly-by-accident/

Photos taken by a Panasonic camera were by far the most attractive. This is because they sold the camera with a prime lens as the "kit lens" (the first lens you get with the camera).

Prime lenses usually have a smaller f-number, which means they have a larger physical aperture.

The largeness of your aperture is directly proportional to what is in focus. The larger the aperture... the less stuff is in focus. Which is what you want in the photos that you described.

You can still buy a Panasonic or Olympus camera, and throw on the 20mm f1.7 lens, but none of their new cameras does not come pre-packaged with that lens anymore, and I don't think they're making any more GF1s.

The new kit lens is a 14mm f2.5 lens, which is still good, but won't have as blurry a background.

You can also get a compact camera to do it... but it will be more fiddly for you to do. (Whereas with the Lumix GF1 setup, almost all your photos will have that nice blurred background, without any fuss).

This is the successor to the GF1 - the GX1. It is the camera that I use to take photos like this.

The lens that you want is the 20mm f1.7 - The price fluctuates, but the cheapest you'll find it is for $300 used. It is a very popular lens because it is small, sharp, and fast (it lets light more light in).

If you can't find a cheap 20mm f1.7, the Leica 25mm f1.4 would be even better, and for not much more money. Leica is the Porsche of cameras. They're expensive, well made, and you don't see them on the street. (Nikon and Canon would be more like ford and toyota)

If you don't plan on processing your photos on your computer, Olympus Pens are better to use. They have better in-camera JPG processing. (I process my photos on my computer, so in-body processing does not matter to me)

There are wide variety of olympus micro four thirds cameras, from the cheapest interchangeable lens camera on the market - the E-PL1 ($270) to the semi-professional OMD EM-5 ($1300). I say semi-professional because it is not supported by professional services. (Canon and Nikon let you pay money for a service to get your lenses repaired faster and have loaner cameras etc. if you break your camera just before a job)

I recommend you get the E-PL1 with the kit zoom, and a 20mm f1.7 lens, or 25mm f1.4 lens. It is good to spend more money on your lenses than on your body, because after a few years, the body gets old and superseded by newer ones, but the lenses will always be good to use on your new cameras and can often be sold for close to the price you bought them for. The 20mm f1.7 lens was $300 a few years ago when it first came out, and it is still that price on the second hand market.

TL;DR, the features you're looking for is a large mm and low f-number. (25mm is better than 20mm AND f1.4 is better than f1.7).

Compact cameras are usually about 8mm f3.5

You could also get a canon or nikon dslr and throw on a 50mm f1.8 (costs about $120 for this lens)

u/jam6618 · 4 pointsr/videography

u/pastramiswissrye is totally right in that lights, sound, lenses, and media are all more important than the best camera.

My personal favorite camera in that price range is the Panasonic G7 and a good 12-35 lens. The G7 is like the little brother to the GH4 as it does 4k and just is missing some of the more pro features and is $600 for the camera. The lens is another $600 but you could just use the kit lens and upgrade your lens later.

Continuing with what Pastrami said, you should have good audio, lights, and media storage, in addition to the camera and lens. For audio, the rode videomic pro is a good all-around shotgun mic that you can put on a boom pole for good short film on location sound, however you will need someone to help hold your boom pole.

For lights, a good reflector will help you use the sun as a light when shooting outside on location for a short film. If you are in a studio, this four socket CFL light kit will go a long way to help. I personally use one of them and they are great for the price. Just pop in four cfl bulbs and you are good to go. If you would prefer LED lights which are smaller and don't heat up as much, but are pricer, you can get this LED studio light kit.

On the media storage side of things, you are going to want to pick up a few of these 64GB U3 SD cards for use with your G7 or any other new camera you get. Especially if you plan on shooting in 4K.

If you are going to shoot in 4K, your file sizes are going to go way up and you are definitely going to need to get more hard drive space on your computer. You may even have to upgrade your computer to handle 4K video editing. It all depends on what you have and what you want to do.

On the editing side, I personally use Final Cut Pro X on my Mac. It is $300 but a great piece of editing software, used by pros. If you are on a mac but don't want to spend money, just use iMovie, it will probably do what you need it to do unless you edit in 4K. On the windows side, some people use sony vegas, some people use AVID, some people use premiere pro, there is a bunch of them out there and you kind of just have to choose one. (I have never used any of them)

Like he said, there is no canon r6i. I assume you mean T6i, but you still need to do some more research. I hope this helps!

u/sa7abi · 1 pointr/AskPhotography

I think the A6000 has some limitations, but if you're doing mostly still photography, it's a great way to get into mirrorless if you can get it at a deal. Some of the limitations of the A6000 are with video - it doesn't do 4K video, and even non-4k, it can overheat when you record videos for a long time. Battery life may not be so great compared to the newer Sony cameras, but you can get spare/3rd party batteries for like $10.

There's a nice video in r/a6000 that discusses if it's still relevant in 2019 - https://www.reddit.com/r/a6000/comments/ad1xjn/sony_a6000_is_it_worth_buying_in_2019/

​

I would recommend getting it from Amazon - they've had it on sale a couple of times over the past year. I got mine for about $335 (new with 16-50 kit lens) during Black Friday. They also have 20% off amazon warehouse items, I think once or twice a year. I'm not sure I'd still recommend it at it's retail price of $650.

​

Right now, Amazon warehouse has a used body only (like new condition) for $353 - https://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B00I8BICCG/ref=olp_twister_child?ie=UTF8&mv_color_name=0&mv_configuration=0&mv_style_name=0

​

I'd wait for to see if the product goes on sale during prime day sale on July 15/16. Right after that on the 17th, Sony is rumored to announce a new body - https://www.sonyalpharumors.com/sr5-this-is-it-folks-sony-will-have-a-big-announcement-on-july-17/

​

The kit lens (16-50mm) is decent all-round lens and I'd use it if it's included in the deal, but I wouldn't buy it or recommend it separately. I think this lens goes for less than $100 on r/photomarket.

​

The kit zoom lens (55-210mm) is actually a pretty good/usable zoom lens at a good price point. I'd buy this separately if its not included - I got this it on massdrop for about $200 (new).

​

You can also use other non-sony/non e-mount lenses with an adapter. For example, you can use a sigma MC-11 adapter ($130-$150 on sale) to mount canon lenses. It's not as great as on a native canon body - the autofocus may hunt, but it allows you to try use/try other options.

​

I tried some Sigma E-mount lenses for low-light photography, and at f/1.4, they're fantastic. These lenses are : Sigma 16mm 1.4 ($400) ; Sigma 30mm 1.4 ($300) ; Sigma 56mm 1.4 ($430). Sigma also has f/2.8 primes that are much cheaper as well.

​

Also, have a look at /r/photomarket as well, they have some good deals on used lenses, but I find amazon much easier to deal with if there's any issues with the body/lens - you get 30 days to return the product if any issues, even with amazon warehouse.

u/dhiltonp · 3 pointsr/photography

m43 shooter here.

Fuji makes great stills cameras. They have notoriously bad video. It's ok for personal use, but not usable in a professional context. Here is a short sample.

Even old fuji models get feature upgrades via firmware updates - the X-E2 is nearly identical to the X-E2S due to a firmware update. Fuji glass is all good. "Fuji’s 18-55mm is regularly viewed as the non-kit lens kit lens. People rave about it’s sharpness, the quality of its bokeh."

Sony makes computers that can take pictures and video. They probably take the best pictures for a given intro price, but I personally dislike their usability. I prefer physical controls to ones on a screen.

----------------------------------

I know you didn't ask, but if you want the most compact option, m43 is the way to go. Yes, the sensor is smaller, but that means the lenses require less glass.

Olympus makes stills-oriented cameras that have ok video. Their newest camera is a rangefinder style as well, but it's $1200 without a lens.

Panasonic and Sony are competitors for the best video. The GX85 might be of interest. It is the first camera with in-body stabilized 4k video, which you might like.

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u/kelsor815 · 3 pointsr/Filmmakers

Not an expert either, but I'll give suggestions anyhow.

Camera: I currently have a T2i, it does everything I'd ever want when it comes to that "line" of Canons. The T3i and T4i don't seem that worth it for an upgrade to me. The hardware is the same, and I don't NEED a swivel screen, or touch screen. You may be different, so keep that in mind. That all being said, the T3i body is a good deal.

Lens - I don't personally use this, but I've heard nothing but good from it. Not much more to say I guess. If you want a zoom lens for more versatility during these shows, but it's all relative. I get by at the moment with a nifty 50mm.

Memory Card- I have the 16 gig version of this, and it's been reliable so far.

Audio Recorder- This is where there may be controversy. Most, if not all, people on this subreddit, suggest the Zoom recorder. Its more expensive, so it's up to you. Based on reviews, they are basically the same.

Microphone- Not sure if you WANT this. It depends on what "live audio" you want to record. If its a loud concert, getting audio to sound good will be extremely difficult. The loud volumes, and usually boosted lows, don't make for the best sounding live recording. Recording off a mic isn't the best in any live situation in a venue anyway. If this is the only thing you'd use a mic for, then I may hold back if I were you, if you know you can get a direct line-in to your Tascam recorder. That is the best solution. If not, the mic is great and I recommend it.

Rig Setup- Might want to make a PVC stabilizer, but try and make it look as classy as possible, to look professional (Is that possible with PVC?) If you want to record your Mic audio to your recorder, you'll need this and this to let the DSLR hold both at the same time. You'll need a couple quarter inch converters too. Maybe an XLR as well, if you want to get direct audio feed from whatever the venue is playing.

I think I typed enough. And I probably forgot about something. Anyway, try and make sense of my wall of text, hope it helps.

Edit: Forgot to say, this'll add up to about $1450 if I did my math right. Not including shipping and stuff.

u/therealamberrose · 1 pointr/infertility

Some of them were my phone, but the better ones (haha) were taken on a Sony a5100. It's compact and good if you're getting into photography a bit to start with. There are many similar cameras around now, but my husband did tons of research and chose this one (I'd need him to give the reasons why, but its been great!)

He gave it to me for my birthday in March 2015 and I've loved it so far...small enough to go in my purse and take out at bars/events...but great for trips and these landscape type photos. Good quality from its auto settings, but numerous capabilities for changing the settings when needed for a more manual experience. And interchangeable lens capabilities. A fun flip screen for selfies. :) And wifi capabilities to send pics straight to your phone/other device for quick sharing! Oh and it takes video.

It does not have a viewfinder, which is hard/not great for some types of photography.

:)

u/SLV1430 · 2 pointsr/photography

Hello all, Need equipment advice on what to purchase URGENTLY

Requirements: Photos for Website and Print for local magazine start up.
Budget: $500 - $800
Preferably from Amazon as we have an Amazon credit card which will enable us to finance. We will use this subreddits affiliate link!

Background/Why we need:
So while the magazine will have dedicated photographers on staff eventually or hired for certain events, to start up me and my business partner need a DSLR to get us started. Although we will eventually have more experienced photographers on board who will have lots of equipment, we still want something that will grow with us, not something too outdated. Video is not a huge concern for us as we have a 4k camcorder. However we will use the DSLR for some limited video shooting. To ensure there isn't glaring differences if we were doing a two camera shoot, SD video will probably not work.

Experience:
I have taken some college level photography classes, but it was a while ago and I have forgotten most of it. We are both quick learners though but "auto focus" and different "camera modes" will be a must.

Needs/what will be shooting:
Lots of "around town" photo shooting in a sunny beach town.
The ability to shoot sports/fast moving images (i know lenses play into this)
standard photography of people we feature in stories
low light environments (we will be shooting a lot of different things in night, so a built in flash/low light capability will be big)

We would like to find a bundle package that includes at least a two lenses. Please keep this in mind.

While most of it will be going online, we need quality good enough for print (non glossy newspaper)

So that's our needs. Please please offer us some help as we have interviews with some people we are featuring starting next week and we also have some stories that require us to compile some general photos of the area we are writing about.

Please let us know what would be best for us to get, remember we want something that will last and grow with us.
What we have looked at so far: although it's all Canon that we are linking, its purely what we have looked at on amazon so far, we are in no way saying we only want canon suggestions

Canon T5i18-55mm IS STM Lens + Kit Includes, 58mm HD Wide Angle Lens + 2.2x Telephoto Lens + 2Pcs 32GB Commander Card + Battery Grip + Extra Battery + Backpack Case
link here


Canon EOS Rebel T6iDSLR CMOS Digital SLR Camera with EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM Lens Bundle (from canon so I imagine all bundle equipment is quality.
link here


Canon T6I EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM Lens + Slave Flash + 58mm Wide Angle and Telephoto Lenses + 32GB Deluxe Accessory Bundle (Are those extra lens' crap?)
link here


Canon EOS Rebel T6i DSLR Video Creator Kit with 18-55mm & 55-250mm Lens + 32GB Accessory Bundle - Another accesorry kit, but shockingly cheaper price for the t6i
link here


Canon EOS Rebel T6
DSLR Camera Bundle with Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS II Lens + Canon EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 III Lens*

  • Now the second lens that this kit includes would be good for sports shots right?


    Another Rebel T6This one with other bundles but what caught our eye is the wide angle lenses it includes, however are we right in thinking they are not official canon lenses?
    link here


    Please help us guys! We are needing to be able to start shooting photography for articles already being written and for interviews coming up next week!

    All help will be greatly appreciated!
u/mkopec · 7 pointsr/photography

Around $400 brand new you can probably get like a T5 with a kit lens, 18-55mm. Pretty good camera, not the best, but for a starter camera its good, way better than any point and shoot.

I know its a gift so keeping it new is probably best, but you could get like a refurbished one from cannon site.

http://shop.usa.canon.com/shop/en/catalog/eos-rebel-t5-ef-s-18-55mm-is-ii-lens-kit-refurbished


http://shop.usa.canon.com/shop/en/catalog/rebel-sl1-ef-s-18-55mm-is-stm-ef-75-300mm-stm-kit-refurbished

http://shop.usa.canon.com/shop/en/catalog/eos-rebel-t5-ef-s-18-55mm-is-ii-ef-50mm-1-8-ii-kit-refurbished

http://shop.usa.canon.com/shop/en/catalog/eos-rebel-t3i-ef-s-18-55mm-is-ii-lens-kit-refurbished

Those all would be pretty sweet for a beginner. She can buy some better lenses later on.

Or you could go the Sony mirror less route with a a6000. I know she wanted a cannon, but the sony a6000 is a way better camera from the get go for the money. Better processor better sensor, the ability to use tons of cheap legacy lenses of all types, wi-fi capability to sync with her phone and download pictures, even control her camera with her phone.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00I8BICB2/ref=s9_simh_gw_g421_i2_r?ie=UTF8&fpl=fresh&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=desktop-1&pf_rd_r=0GV0B9C4XN0ZPMEE6F0B&pf_rd_t=36701&pf_rd_p=2079475242&pf_rd_i=desktop

You could probably snag a used one of these or refurbished for about $450-$500.

u/krunchynoodlez · 4 pointsr/Cameras

If you're just getting into it, I would consider a camera body that costs $500 USD or less. My own personal recommendation is the Sony A6000. The body and kit lens is small and compact compared to a traditional DSLR like the Canon T6i and performs just as well. It also has the option of being able to mount vintage lenses on it due to it's smaller form factor and the lens mount being closer to the sensor. This means you can get good but cheap manual lenses from back in the day for often times $100 USD or less plus a $18 USD converter mount.

If you have any questions about this camera system (i own the A6000) or in general, please feel free to ask either through comments or pm me. Shameless plug (https://instagram.com/snappedbyandy for example photos)

Also. It sounds like you want to take a lot of landscapes, and for that you want a lens with a low focal length. Now, the kit lens that comes with cameras is nice and all, but if you want some real stunning pictures, you'll get a better quality prime wide-angle lens. "Prime" meaning the lens can't zoom and "wide-angle" meaning you have a wider field of view. Since it doesn't need to move, there's less glass needed, and the quality of the picture is better. Something that's 12mm to 20mm should do the trick. I'll link a personal recommendation below should you choose to go with the A6000.

Again, i want to emphasize to buy used if possible. Especially on lenses. You'll get severe discounts compared to buying something brand new. Typically people take good care of their lenses, and if you can meet the person before buying, a little legwork can save you a bundle of money.

Camera with kit lens (i recommend buying used/refurb locally if possible)

https://www.amazon.com/Sony-Mirrorless-Digitial-3-0-Inch-16-50mm/dp/B00I8BICB2/ref=sr_1_5?s=photo&ie=UTF8&qid=1539180473&sr=1-5&keywords=a6000&dpID=41AEqhgdLtL&preST=_SX300_QL70_&dpSrc=srch

Recommended wide angle lens for landscape with the A6000:

https://www.amazon.com/Rokinon-Ultra-Angle-Mount-RK12M/dp/B00JD4TAWI/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1539180938&sr=8-1&keywords=rokinon+12+e+mount

an example of a good vintage lens:

https://www.amazon.com/Minolta-MD-50mm-Japan-Mount/dp/B008QFXYYU/ref=sr_1_16?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1539180558&sr=1-16&keywords=minolta+rokkor

an example of a converter to convert the mount of a vintage lens to the Sony E-mount

https://www.amazon.com/Fotasy-NEX-VG30-NEX-VG900-NEX-FS100-NEX-FS700/dp/B00E5T5BJW/ref=sr_1_3?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1539180630&sr=1-3&keywords=md+to+e+mount&dpID=41RFJ6J3P1L&preST=_SX300_QL70_&dpSrc=srch


Guy with a dedicated blog to attaching vintage lenses to the Sony E mount system (he uses a Sony A7, which is more expensive, but the A6000 uses the same mount system, so it still all applies):

https://phillipreeve.net/blog/affordable-manual-lenses-for-the-sony-alpha-77r7ii7rii-and-7s/

u/Fmeson · 2 pointsr/GoodValue

Ok, if all you want out of your camera is for it to take nice pictures on a vacation, be less than 600 USD and be portble, your best bet is a high quality compact camera like the rx100 (note there are 3 successors to it for more money of course):

http://www.amazon.com/Sony-DSC-RX100-Sensor-Digital-Camera/dp/B00889ST2G

Will a point and shoot take good quality pictures? Yes. Point and shoots will fall behind DSLRs image quality in 2 situations: low light and printing large images. If you want to shoot in the dark or print poster sized images, you will need to look elsewhere (and probably spend a lot more than $600). However, since you say a smart phone takes nice enough pictures, you will probably enjoy the better image quality of a nice point and shoot, but not miss the ability to print posters.

Do point and shoots fit your budget? yes, I picked one of the most expensive ones as an example. A S100 is even cheaper and still a great camera.

Are point and shoots portable? Yes. They can often fit in your pocket without discomfort (depending on your pocket size of course). That is more than I can say about a M43 camera. They are smaller than a DSLR, but not so small you can carryone around easily without a bag.

Based on what I have read from you, I would bet a point and shoot would serve your needs better than a M43 camera. However, if you intend on making photography into a serious hobby (i.e. willing to poor more money into it over time for better lenses and bodies) and want to take pictures beyond vacation photos, then a M43 camera might be for you.

What you have to understand is that M43 cameras and DSLRs are meant to be paired with expensive lenses. Buying a DSLR or M43 camera and not buying nice lenses is a bit like building a nice house on a shitty foundation. In a few years your nice house will start to crumble and while you spend all your money keeping it standing your neighbohr who spent more on his foundation can spend his money on a new pool.


So, ask yourself what you want out of the camera. Do you just want it to take better pictures than an iPhone? Get a point and shoot. Do you want to make photography into a serious hobby? Get a M43 camera and some starting lenses.

Here are some good starting lenses:

http://thewirecutter.com/reviews/the-first-micro-four-third-lenses-you-should-buy/

Can you see yourself buying 2-3 of those lenses in the next year?

u/provideocreator · 3 pointsr/videography

For under $1000, I would say go with a mirrorless camera instead of an actual camcorder. They're made for photos, but Panasonic has done a fantastic job with their cameras in this price range and they shoot really high quality video. The advantage with these is they're light and portable, plus you can change your lenses either using a zoom lens or a prime lens, and there's room to increase your video quality and sharpness in the future somewhat with better lenses, whereas with a camcorder you get what you get and there's no upgrading it.

To answer your question, yes, anything you buy now will be digital, typically the consumer cards save everything on an SD card. As far as the versatility to get a vintage look and still do short films, you can do a lot with post-processing as long as your camera takes good quality video. By that I mean look into color grading.

A good camera at this price range is the Panasonic G85. This camera shoots at 4k resolution (3840x2160) at 30 frames per second, and can do HD video at 60 frames per second. It also has fairly good image stabilization, plus you can always film 60fps and slow the footage down for more cinematic shots. Another great feature is that it's weather sealed, so you can use it outside in less than ideal situations without completely destroying the camera.
This camera is my top choice for under $1000. If you want to see a good review of this camera, check out this one my DSLR Video Shooter: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xv2OWv6pWVM

u/bondjaybond · 1 pointr/Filmmakers

As a Youtuber who's invested in the wrong gear before the right gear, here's a quality list that I've found works for my needs and will likely be great for you.


Camera

Panasonic GH4: This is a great camera that shoots 4K. If you are shoot in 4K, downscale to 1080p, you have the option to reframe and zoom into a closer shot without losing quality. It has a flip out screen so you can see yourself, focus peaking to show you on screen if you're in focus, and can record longer clips (in select modes) than the Canon T3i to make syncing easier. This camera is also great for when you want to deliver in 4K one day.
$1699


AC Power adapter: No worrying about batteries for the indoor shooting. $20


Lens

Panasonic 12-35mm: Versatile lens that gives you great range. $1000


14-42 kit lens: Cheaper alternative. $120


Audio

Zoom H4N: Great recorder for your mics. Monitor each mic's level independently. $250


Rode NTG-2: Shotgun mic. $270


Sennheiser Wireless Lav: Expensive, but great quality. $640


Audio Technica ATR-3350s: Cheap corded lavs with long wires. $30


You'll need one long XLR cable, a light stand to use for the boom, and some kind of shotgun mic shock mount. $60 for all.


Lighting

3-light softbox kit: Great kit, been using it for a year with no issues. I don't use the over head light, as I don't have the space. I can use the light stand to boom or for another light. $170


Neewer CN-160: Small LED light to help light certain situations or to use as a hair light. $30


Tripod

Manfrotto Tripod w/Fluid Head: Great set up, worth the investment, but there are cheaper alternatives. $350


Memory Card

64GB Sandisk Extreme Pro: Great card which will allow for smooth 4K recording. $100


____



If you have any questions about any of this gear, let me know and good luck with everything!

u/thesecretbarn · 5 pointsr/photography

I'm sure others will chime in with different suggestions, but here's how I would spend it:

Canon T3i, body only: http://amzn.com/B004M170YC

Tamron 28-75mm f/2.8 lens: http://amzn.com/B0007YZLFS

It's a little over your budget, but not by much. If you're willing to spend a little more, I'd upgrade to a 60D. Eventually you'd come to appreciate the extra control dial and better autofocus. http://amzn.com/B0040JHVCC

The cheap kit lens that can come with cameras will produce acceptably sharp images, but will severely limit you in terms of your ability to get good photos indoors in less than perfect lighting. A good lens that opens up to at least f/2.8 is far more important than the camera body you choose- if you go Nikon or Pentax or Sony or whatever, try to budget in a nice bright lens. I have this Tamron, and I love it. It's very sharp, and is a fantastic deal.

Whatever camera you end up with, go jump on /r/PhotoClass2013 so you know what you're doing when your child shows up!

u/papatonepictures · 1 pointr/AskPhotography

What kind of DSLR should you buy? A used one. Don't be too precious about brand names. For the first year, you're not going to know much about what you're doing, you're just going to be figuring it all out (well, I shouldn't speak for you...but that's what it was like for me. I'm a sloooooooow learner. ;) I'm a Canon shooter, and I've had good luck with them. You can get a used Canon t2i to get you started. Photography is less about the gear. It's more about the person behind the camera. Start simple. Save your money. Then, later, when you genuinely know what kind of shooter you are, what features you need...then blow a big wad of cash. I started simple and was glad I did.

If you want something smaller than a DSLR that travels well, consider the Sony NEX line, or other good small cameras that are all manual include the Canon s110 which will help you learn about about getting your camera into manual mode, which is where you can make better pictures. It's super small, and I carry it on my belt so that I have a wide angle camera with me even when I'm shooting on my DSLR with a zoom lens.

Keep in mind, there are plenty of great used DSLRs out there that will get you started. Here's a tutorial about buying a DSLR for less than a hundred dollars. Good luck, and happy learning! :)

u/LukeOnTheBrightSide · 2 pointsr/photography

> I get 5% cash back on Amazon right now also for the next $700 I spend and 1% after that so seems like a good time to buy.

Yes, let the justification flow through you. That $35 you save sure beats the fact that it was $100 cheaper last Christmas. Although I'll give you that the Sony seems to be priced well.

Not that I didn't load up on some stupid shit this month, so I can't really knock you for that!

You've picked an interesting two cameras. The Pentax K2's are, supposedly, some of the most durable and weather-resistant DSLRs around. Sony, meanwhile, has some of the best tech - but isn't exactly known for durability. Choices, choices.

If durability is really important to you, and you like the Pentax, I'd go with that. If portability is needed, go with the Sony. Take a look at the lenses you'd most want (assuming you have enough experience to know) and price them out.

Sony is doing awesome, incredible things with their newest cameras... but the pace of improvement is so rapid, that it's hard to look at the couple years old model. Nowadays, the A9 and A7RIII seem to be just as good as DSLRs... but from what I understand, the A6000's era was still balancing pros and cons.

This sounds like I'm knocking Sony, but I really like them. Their image quality is just excellent, and there will be new lenses for the E-mount. That seems way more future-proof than the A mount, and probably even Pentax. It's just that for when these cameras started, if the smaller size isn't critical, I think the Pentax has fewer compromises and a few advantages.

u/marsofwar · 1 pointr/photography

Definitely talk to your fiance about what she wants to do. A lot of people want to get into photography cause they see the image quality and the pretty bokeh and/or blurry backgrounds but the reality of it is, not everyone wants to lug around a hefty piece of equipment everywhere.

Does she just want some better quality pictures to put on social media sites (FB, instagram, etc..)? Or does she really want to go around and look for nice angles and composition?

If you can borrow someone's camera for a week that'll be a great way to start. If not, and she just wants better quality pictures, maybe start off with Canon S series or the G series. Very solid cameras and small form factor make them ideal to carry around.

For a beginner dslr, as others have stated, thats a good bundle to start. Or go up to the t5i.

Or for a little more, you can get her Sony a6000. Very solid camera with good image quality and small as well so its easier to carry around.

u/adamk1234 · 1 pointr/Cameras

I'll second /u/Bester2001 and say the S110 is a great camera. It looks like you could get it for $200 right now. If you want to upgrade a bit more, I would pick the Sony RX100 (link: http://www.amazon.com/Sony-DSC-RX100-Sensor-Digital-Camera/dp/B00889ST2G/). It's more expensive ($500) but I think it's significantly nicer. It's still pocketable and small so no problems there. The great thing with this camera is you can get really great depth of field pictures. You know when you see pictures and the background is blurry? This camera can help you get some of those shots if you want. All in all, it's a great camera.

You can definitely keep either of these cameras for a few years and they're great for families.

u/dancemasterv · 1 pointr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon
  1. Technically, the most expensive thing on my list is an amazon gift card since it goes up to $2,000, but I think that's cheating lol. So the most expensive item on my list is a Nikon D5100 DLSR Camera .

  2. I want the camera since (like many others) I really enjoy photography and taking pictures. I don't have a camera atm except for my phone. Although the phone gets the job done, a nice camera would definitely be ideal.

  3. Yes, i'd be fine if I never got the camera. I'm a fairly simple man who believes that people don't need a lot of things. Heck, I don't feel I need anything on my wishlist at all, even the shampoo. They're all wants. I think it'd be great to have some of these things, and some may make everyday living much easier, but none of it is necessarily needed. I definitely want it, but I don't need it.

    Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds!
u/kingofnima · 1 pointr/AskPhotography

Just to compare, here is a selection from the Canon side of things with Amazon used prices:
Canon 7d - $990
Tamron 17-50 2.8 - $340
These two are a great basis to work off off and get you to $1330.

If you want to spend some more you could add the following:
Canon 50mm f/1.8 - 100
Canon Speedlite 430EX - 235

But to be honest, if your wife is just starting out and money is a bit tight, don't go out spending $900 or more on a body. As most people will tell you, picture quality is mostly due to lenses. Canon t3i, Canon t4i or 60D as well as Nikon 3200 and 5100 are all excellent bodies and have more than enough features to keep her happy. If you get either of those bodies and a decent 17-50mm lens as well as a 50mm prime she will have great tools to learn on with space to grow.

Just like daegon I would recommend to buy used. Most Photographers look out for their things quite well and most of these lenses and bodies are made at quite good quality levels. I hope this helps.

u/Wombodia · 3 pointsr/a6000

I haven't personally ever bought a camera used but I know there are a lot of good places to get a solid deal on an a6000 as it has been out for a while and one of the more popular mirrorless cameras. Sounds like you have a good eye on eBay.

I would check out /r/photomarket as you can get an a6000 for $300-400 depending on amount of shutter count, overall condition, and if it comes with the kit lens. You also might search your local Craigslist and Facebook marketplace for an a6000, might not have any luck but it is worth a shot. You also might check Adorama or B&H as they occasionally have them as well. Your best bet would probably be /r/photomarket thought.

If you want new Amazon usually has it on sale every few months around $400 for the body only. You can check the camelcamelcamel here. If you want the kit lens with it they usually go for $500, again you can check here regarding the historic prices on Amazon. Usually if it goes on sale through Amazon it will be on sale on other sites like Adorama, B&H, etc. If you can hold off I would personally go for a new one via Amazon the next time it goes down to $400.

u/Ostomesto · 1 pointr/photography

I am a beginning photographer and have a question regarding returning my first camera.

Around Christmas time I purchased this Canon T6 package as my first camera. I have never owned a DSLR before but I am quite interested in photography.


I have now found this Nikon D3400 package for the same price. It is sold on Ebay by what seems to be a very reputable seller. Doing some research shows the D3400 to be slightly better overall than the T6. Better ISO range, larger sensor, higher resolution, more focal points, battery life, and so on.

Would it be worth it to go through the hassle of returning my Canon T6 and instead purchasing the Nikon D3400. Although it is sold on Ebay it seems like a much much better deal overall and would be the best use of my money as an introductory camera.


Any advice would be appreciated! Considering lenses, use, purpose, or anything else that comes to mind. Thank you!

u/kare_kano · 2 pointsr/photography

> I am a leather maker and take horrible pictures of my stuff (maybe it's my skill)

It may be your skill but you're also most likely not using a good lens for it. You need a macro lens that can do 1:1 or 1:2 magnification. Here's a nice video that gives a cool introduction to macro photography and the most common gotchas.

Product photography is not hard once you got a decent lens, you can do it at home and you mostly need a white sheet of paper as background and some natural light coming in through the window. You can of course add artificial lights and all kinds of tricks as well as post-processing, but those are the basics for getting some decent shots straight out of camera.

Now the Tamron SP 90mm mentioned in the above video is a very nice macro lens but a manual focus version is about $200 and an autofocus version is more so it's not a good fit for your budget. Perhaps something to keep in mind for later on. Manual focus is fine for your needs, the leather I presume is not going anywhere so no need for autofocus. The focal length (90mm) is also not a versatile length for travel.

So for now focus on your travel needs. The Sony A6000 with a 16-50mm zoom is about $400-425 used.

The A6000 is a mirrorless camera and can easily adapt macro lenses from most other camera mounts, so it would not be a problem later to get a macro lens plus a $20 adapter and it will work fine. I recommend looking for older manual focus macro lenses because like I said you don't need autofocus, and older lenses are cheaper but just as good as long as the glass is in good condition.

u/CallMeByYourDogsName · 5 pointsr/videography

I’m gonna go against the grain here and say that there are plenty of cameras you could’ve gotten that are better for video than the t7i. Not to say that you shouldn’t have bought it, but I will say that you should’ve done your homework. Don’t be spontaneous with your purchases. I did the same thing as you and bought a cheap camera, because I just wanted anything to get myself started.

Here’s a list of cameras I would buy before buying a t7i:

Panasonic G85 - $700

Panasonic G7 w/kit lens - <$500

Sony A6300 - <$800

Used Panasonic Gh4 - $600? Maybe

If you could save a little, I’d go for the GH5 or the BMPCC 4K or the XT-1, or maybe a used Sony.

There’s so many options out there. I’m not trying to get you down or anything. I just think you can do better for the money. You can probably get great footage from the rebel. It is true that you have to have a good eye for film. But it doesn’t hurt to have some nice machines to help along the way. Good luck, friend.

Edit: I like what one of the people in the comments said. Go shoot your videos. It’s only a waste if you don’t use it.

u/pmexplore · 3 pointsr/NewTubers

I will try to keep this short and to the point even though your question is quite in depth.

What is vlog? 
Its a Video blog. There are various types of vlogs. Some youtubers like shaytards and casey neistat are really good storytellers. So they post their day to day lives online sharing interesting parts of their day. 

What are the unexpected challenges of making vlogs? 
For many you tubers who vlog without setting boundaries and respecting those boundaries have ended up in broken relationships. 2014-2016 I have seen some long time you tubers (some who have been doing it from 2006) ended up separating or divorced because of this. So choose wisely.

What camera to use? 
The nikon d7000 you have is a good starting camera for entry level video Production. But it is not a good vlogging camera when you are starting out. It is too heavy for the initial vloggin application.


Any one of the three cameras that she wants would suffice for her application. I currently use the sony rx100 mVI. 

This is my recommended list for vlogging cameras. If you have good budget.

  1. Sony rx100 mV http://amzn.to/2gilEAC
  2. Canon PowerShot G7 X Mark II http://amzn.to/2gh0Btq
    the list below might be an over kill. But will allow for her to grow into higher production value in the long term.
  3. Canon EOS M5! http://amzn.to/2hcEB52
  4. Sony A6500 http://amzn.to/2gHGTIp

    Make sure you get a gorilla tripod or a flexible tripod that she would find it easy to carry around and also a ton of third part batteries. You can find them cheap on amazon.

    For video editing. I would suggest starting with Sony vegas movie suite. http://amzn.to/2gHJoua
    This is what I started on after doing Movie maker for years. It has plenty of built in tutorials with guided editing within the application. So you would learn some advanced techniques. This will prepare the mind for other complex systems like hit film final cut and adobe. Sony’s editing software is really robust. they are just not good at marketing it well.


    Hopefully I answered all your questions. If I missed something or if you need clarification do not hesitate to reach out. 

Good luck!

u/masondaugherty · 5 pointsr/videography

I know it's been stereotypical to jerk off to the Panasonic G7, but after using it for two years as both a dedicated video and photo camera I've became extremely comfortable using it and can vouch for its superiority. This is the first camera I recommend to family and friends, and at $500 nothing can compare to it.

I'd recommend with the spare cash picking up the 25mm f1.7, its fabulous for the price and produces some amazing results.

Heres my website if you want to check out what I've done with the camera.

u/rob79 · 6 pointsr/GoodValue

A lot of older DSLR's are a good deal. I mean, the T3i /u/smoothcam72 suggested is really great, but as a beginner you'd probably be just as happy with a T3 which can be had for less. ($386). That would let you squeeze in another (used) lens and still stay under your $500 budget.

The thing with a DSLR is that you should put as much money as possible into your lenses and the body should really be just "good enough" (unless you want to go pro). Not only will your lens really impact the quality of the photo (more so than the body) but they also don't lose value (as much). A good lens now will still be a good lens in 20 years, whereas that T3i (or T3, or whatever) will be totally obsolete.

Since you're hiking you'll want a good lens for landscapes I would imagine. The kit lens will definitely get you started, but you'll probably find yourself wanting to get a new lens before you want a new body.

Don't get caught up in megapixels either, the T3 is 12.2MP, but honestly, are you planning on blowing up your stuff to poster size? You could make quite a large print from a 12MP image.

EDIT: For reference, you can print a 12MP image as a very high quality 8"x10", whereas an 18MP image gives you similar quality at 11"x14". Not a huge difference.

u/Gackt · 2 pointsr/photography

Here's the deal. Upgrading to a canon g12 is cool but it's still a P&S with a crippple manual mode.

So one of your others option is interchangeable lens cameras like micro four thirds cameras or DSLRs.

Don't be scared of getting an dslr, entry level ones have automatic (P&S style) modes just like your old point & shoots and will take much better photos with the same amount of easiness so why cripple yourself if size isn't issue? You also get access to amazing lens and go manual when you need it, most of the time most photographers are shooting aperture priority/shutter priority anyway.

Micro four third cameras have much better quality (9 times the sensor size) than P&S they are kinda small but size isn't an issue as you said so the problem is than a capable MFT (micro four thirds) camera like the Panasonic GF2 cost as much as an entry level Canon (T3) which takes pictures just as good as the $1700 Canon 7D only it has slower pictures per second and worse autofocus. And you also get access to the amazing catalog of canon lenses which is much better than MFT lenses currently available, everything I said about Canon also applies to nikon I just simply don't know the model numbers. Remember DSLRs are not harder to use than MFT cameras, and in fact, in manual mode DSLRs are actually easier due to the interfaces used. Also better autofocus=easier

Sony NEX: similar to MFT, a bit better, but pathetic choice of lenses, and overpriced accessories. You can use an adapter to access the Alpha mount lenses by sony/carl zeiss but you lose autofocus and still have to deal with the shitty body. Size isn't an issue to you so something better between MFT and common DSLRs is Sony's Translucent Mirror Technology cameras, they have the same quality of DSLRs but lack an optical viewfinder so whatever you see through the EVF (electronic view finder) is delayed so not good for sports but not a problem for you, also cheaper and offers the 10 frames (photographs) per second shooting found in $1500+ cameras (hell, the $1700 7D has only 8 FPS) for the same or sligthly cheaper price of an MFT camera or an entry level DSLR.

TL;DR Size isn't an issue for you so get an entry level Canon/Nikon/Sony (preferably nikon or canon) DSLR, they have easy-mode shootings so don't worry about that and you can get cheap lenses for screwing around with no worry then upgrade later to better ones. Same quality of a $1700 dslr but less FPS and slower/less accurate autofocusing (though still faster than P&S). $150-200 more than a g12. _If you don't wanna deal with interchangeable lenses stick with P&S and get a Canon SX13IS if you need the zoom or the G12 if you don't.

Any questions please ask and I hope I helped you.

u/jonjiv · 7 pointsr/personalfinance

This is highly dependent on your price range, but if you're going to be in it for $500 prizes, I'm going to assume you'd like to spend less than $1000.

In that case, you can't really go wrong with a Canon dSLR, especially the t series, their entry level camera. I think the newest version is the Canon t5i, but the t4i and t3i also shoot high quality 1080p video and you'll be able to find them for cheaper.

The Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera is increasingly popular in that price range, but I wouldn't recommend it to an amateur. It has a fantastic image but a high learning curve.

Nikon dSLR's are great too, but if you invest in Nikon lenses as a videographer, you're going to have a bad time. The majority of video camera bodies are manufactured for Canon mount lenses, so if you ever want to leave Nikon, you're kind of stuck or forced to use lens mount convertors.

With all of these cameras, lenses are arguably more important than the camera itself. With the Canon, the best bang for your buck is going to be a Canon 50mm 1.8. It's a cheap lens, but it has a great image for the price and is great in low light. If you can afford a good 2.8 zoom lens like the 17-55 2.8, go for it, but it's often near $1000.

u/acm · 2 pointsr/Denver

Thanks for the follow!

This was shot with a Canon 70D with a Canon EF 24-70mm f/4L IS USM Lens.

That said, I have some additional thoughts on gear. You truly can't go wrong with any Canon, Nikon, or Sony kit these days. My camera is 5 years old, and I've been looking to upgrade for a while now. The successor is the 80D for $1k. It's a great mid-level crop sensor DSLR that has some sensor improvements over the 70D. The 90D is supposedly coming later this year too.

If I wasn't already invested in Canon lenses though, I'd take a hard look at Sony. The a7iii just came out and has some really impressive specs at a decent price. It's $2k for just the body, which is a bit over your budget. Sony also tends to charge less for the body and more for the lenses than Canon, so in some price comparisons they can seem cheaper. a6500 is within your budget, with room to buy a lens or two. I'd recommend going to a camera shop or somewhere where you can get your hands on the gear and see what you like and dont like. A couple times a year Mike's Cameras brings a ton of gear to the Denver Zoo and lets people try it all out. That'd be a good event to check out.

Hope that helps!

u/musubk · 2 pointsr/CampingandHiking

As a semi-pro photographer who owns like 6 dSLR's, I'm going to second the recommendation for a Sony NEX/a-series for a hiking camera. I had an F3 but ruined it in a crash with my drone, soon to be replaced with a NEX6, but if I was willing to spend $800 on a hiking camera it'd be the a6000 (they've dropped the NEX name in the current models). I use them with adapters so I can use my good Nikon glass but it looks like the Sony lenses aren't bad. I still carry my Nikon D610 in the pack when backpacking but it's awkward dangling around my neck.

For $500-$600, this

For $800, this

NEX/a-series main advantage is that it uses an APS-C sized sensor rather than a micro 4/3s. A bigger sensor generally has better noise and color characteristics and nicer depth of field. If you want entry or mid level dSLR quality in a compact package, these cameras will do it. My Nikon D7000 is only superior in ergonomics.

If the zoom you're talking about was 'digital zoom', it's exactly the same thing as taking a picture without zoom and cropping the image later on your computer. Don't let that be a selling point. There are optical zoom lenses for the NEX/a-series line and you can use a really wide variety of lenses with adapters since the cameras are thin enough to give the proper backfocal distance even with an adapter and the sensor is the larger size that dSLR lenses are intended to work with.

Short version, the NEX/Alpha line has good image quality, is simple enough to start with, and is expandable enough with lens adapters if you decide you need more in the future.

You will need to learn composition and exposure if you want good results no matter what you get. It's not true what people say that the camera doesn't matter, but a nice camera won't make a bad photo good.

u/leatherkuiperbelt · 4 pointsr/photography

I bought a Sony a6000 about a year ago and really love it. It's a really capable camera, and quite a bit smaller than your average DSLR. The lens ecosystem isn't as robust (especially on the low end) as Canon or Nikon, but you can fill gaps with adapted legacy lenses for not a lot of money. I have used an old manual focus 100mm Canon FD-mount lens for macro and it works pretty well on the a6000 with focus peaking and magnification. The a6000 is mirrorless so there is less noise than a DSLR, (you just hear the shutter not the mirror and shutter) but it doesn't have silent shooting mode like some of the nicer sonys. It sounds like if you can swing it one of the A7 series of cameras might work well, as they provide better low light performance and some have silent shooting, but I'm not sure which ones.

u/caraeeezy · 1 pointr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

Probably the nice camera I have had my eye on. I never added it to my WL because, I mean shit, it is expensive. But I have a passion for live music and the culture that surrounds it. I would LIVE behind a camera if I had one that was nice enough. But mostly, those pure moments when an artist is on stage, pretty much bearing their hard work, their art, their soul to you; those are the moments I wish I could capture (on a device better than my phone).

Then on the other hand, I am an avid people watcher. When I lived closer to the airport, I would go for lunch and sit and watch people pass by and imagine what their lives are like. Or go on campus at a school to the main outdoor area and watch the students bustle by.

And let us not forget the most pure form of beauty there is; nature. I have wanted to do a project where I go to the same place, every day, and take a picture. Same angle, same exact time. And do it for a whole year. I just wonder what it will look like in a time lapse.

u/higher_moments · 1 pointr/Cameras

When I was in the market for my first "nice" camera without breaking the bank six months ago, the consensus seemed to be that the Sony NEX-3N is the best value in the under-$500 range. Having owned that camera since then, I can say it was worth every penny. With an APS-C sensor (same size as the pricier entry-level dSLRs) and a decent kit lens, I think camera takes pretty respectable pictures (here's one of my favorites, with a bit of RAW editing) and offers as much manual control as you want.

The low price comes at the expense of a few features found on more expensive cameras, perhaps most notably a viewfinder and hot shoe, though this has never really bothered me. I can tell that I'm going to enjoy these sorts of features when I'm willing to spend more on a camera, but in the meantime, I'm satisfied with the control and image quality I have now.

I know Sony has been revamping/replacing the NEX line recently—Amazon reports that the NEX-3N has been upgraded to the a5000, which offers a few more features for a bit more money—so it'd certainly worth doing some research to find the version that fits your budget and your needs. At any rate, I think the Sony mirrorless cameras fit the bill quite well in this price range.

u/SmileyRileySurfs · 2 pointsr/photography

Need some camera buying advice.

I've been shooting for 3 years, and I don't have my own setup. I normally use my sisters' Nikon L330, or my Dad's Canon SX30IS. Both are non-DSLR, and they look like DSLR's and perform mediocre, but not quite what I'm looking for. My Mom recently gave me a Nikon B500, which I really don't like- simply because it has NO manual settings. I always use manual settings on the SX30, and so now I'm looking in to a DSLR.

I am in to shooting surfing photos/videos, and I've been checking out the Nikon D3300 since you can upgrade to a 200mm lens for just $149. (This would be down the road) On the other hand, the Canon T5 looks almost as legitimate, however it has 18MP to the D3300's 24.2. The canon T5 has a 300mm lens option at just $98, which is extremely fair priced and another purchase for down the road.

As for preference, I don't know the difference between the performance of Canon vs. Nikon DSLR's, and I'd like to hear some feedback. Since I am shooting surfing, I'm looking for the best options for focus and zoom, and long-range quality. I also take a lot of Macro shots, but this doesn't matter as much.

Any feedback is appreciated, cheers!

u/kabbage123 · 2 pointsr/videography

Hi /u/orderless, It all depends on what you are looking for.

Right now, Panasonic and Sony are the leaders in DSLM cameras when it comes to video capabilities.

A lot of people are extremely happy with the Panasonic G7. It produces an excellent image and can capture at 4k.

If you find yourself going handheld a lot, I'd recommend shelling out the extra cash to get the G85. It's very similiar to the G7, but has IBIS (internal body stabilization). That means the sensor moves along with your body movement so as to help stabilize the image... it's really incredible how it works.

Canon is just not as competitive right now in entry level DSLR/DSLM markets. They make great cameras, but Sony and Panasonic will give you more value for your money.

Hope this helps!

u/bigdogxxl · 2 pointsr/iphone

Think DSLR but smaller. I highly recommend the Sony A6000 with the stock 16-50mm lens. You can pick one up less than $600 brand new on Amazon, stick in auto mode and get some fantastic shots. It's also a great camera to learn on if you do decide to keep it and want to go beyond the auto setting. Here's something I took a few months ago on auto (very lightly retouched).

The other option is something like the Sony RX100 point and shoot. Again, it's a tiny camera and on auto you will get great shots.

u/UUBBBRR · 2 pointsr/goodyearwelt

WSIWT: Chromepak Trumans for the baby shower. I'll update with a picture later if possible.

AOTD: Probably any number of Vibergs from the sample sale. I had just gotten into better footwear and couldn't see why they were so great. Also, I had just picked up a pair of Aldens at full retail so I was tapped out shoe budget wise. Hopefully they don't do this upcoming sample sale in Japan and I can get one of you great fellows to proxy for me!

GD: Pretty sure I'm set to get the Sony DSC-RX100M III for my camera purchase. Anyone know of a better place/price for it? My limited Googling hasn't shown much better pricing and Amazon returns make me feel good.

u/Zaerr_gaming · 1 pointr/photoclass2019

Hey Peter, thanks for the chance to improve all of us here on reddit in our photography skills!

​

Most of the online gaming community calls me Zaerr, but my real name is Christian. I live in New Hampshire right now, but I was born and raised in New Jersey. I work sales for a plumbing supply company right now, and I've had this a6000 mirror less camera for a while now, and really want to do something with it. I recently went to PAX EAST in Boston, and decided to bring my camera to take photos of cosplayers and my friends and really had such a great time. My photos were not the best, but I feel like this is something I can really learn and pursue. I have never been particularly good at many things in my life, but I had so much fun that it sparked a fire in my soul.

​

I really enjoy macro shots, and portrait shots.

​

This is my favorite shot : https://imgur.com/uubGB9y

​

u/master0li · 2 pointsr/Beginning_Photography

Is your moon criteria because you want to be able to zoom really far or that you feel only decent cameras can do that? I ask because if you don't need a long reach you could put more money toward a better camera/lens that's shorter.

If you don't need long reach and want a small camera a used RX100 will give you great quality for stills and video for under $400. You mention travel so I think for walking around it's great. It's a fixed lens though so you can't get more out of it down the line.

If you're thinking of it more like an investment and you'll grow into it over time you'll probably want to go with an ILC (interchangeable lens camera). Mirrorless will be smaller DSLR will be bigger. Just know that you're buying into a whole ecosystem because because lenses aren't swapable between brands. There are adapters but generally you lose things like auto focus unless you pay big bucks for an adapter.

For DSLR a used Nikon D3300 or Canon T6 is under $400. For mirrorless a used Sony a5000. There's also the micro 4/3's mirrorless systems but someone else would have to chime in for recommendations as I have no experience w/ them.

I should note that all my specific recommendations don't have a ton of reach (can't get far subjects). But what you save on that gets you incredible quality if you take the time to learn. Also w/ the ILC cameras you could get a telephoto lens in the future. You could get a cheaper body and get a kit that has 2 lenses one of which is a telephoto - used Nikon D3100 Kit or used Canon T5 kit for right at $400. You have to swap lens to go long. If you really want that zoom for cheaper or smaller overall size probably look at choices in this article.

That said if you're going to stay on auto mode all the time my recommendations are probably not worth the price premium since you won't get the most out of it. Save some bucks and get a point and shoot that's easier to travel with and you're more likely to take out and use. I will say the quality gap between camera phones and point and shoots is pretty minimal these days. You probably need to spend $300-$400 for the significant jump in quality.

u/Slarm · 1 pointr/AskPhotography

You can, but you can't include anything after the actual item number including I think reference links.

So for example a link like

amazon.com/gp/product/B01D93Z89W/ref=s9_acsd_hps_bw_c_x_1_w
would not be okay.

A link like

amazon.com/gp/product/B01D93Z89W
should be fine.

You can pay a lot less on eBay for the same kit, but really, most of that lot of stuff is junk. The telephoto and wide angle lenses (converters) will sort of do what they claim, but at great cost to image quality. Everything other than the camera and 18-55mm lens is essentially bottom of the barrel.

The lens and camera together retail for $450 from reputable sources. Whether the listing you were looking at includes a manufacturer warranty is questionable. For the $30 less you'd pay for one of those kits, you could get a better SD card and a probably slightly better tripod, and a probably better warranty.

u/jvanderh · 2 pointsr/photography

I posted awhile back about upgrading from a point and shoot to a used four thirds for food photography. You all were super helpful, and I'm looking to make a decision in the next few days, so I thought I'd ask again about the options I'm looking at. I'm basically looking for under $200, with a lens included in that. Amazon would be ideal, because I have a gift card.

I have a few different PENs in my cart (E-PM1, E-PL1, E-PL2, E-PL3) as well as a Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF2 and a Sony Alpha Nex-3.

I'm not married to those models, they're just the ones I found in the price range. I'm especially wondering: would the increased resolution of the NEX be noticeable? And even though they're all four thirds, do some have bigger/better sensors than others? Any advice or alternate recommendations much appreciated.

Edit: I do care about it being able to do video.

u/1armedfreak · 2 pointsr/Cameras

My recommendations

All of these meet your resolution and frame rate requirements.


Rx100
this camera is very conveniently sized. it has a non interchangeable 24-70 lens but it is a really good lens. In your case it would be great since its small, light, and takes really nice photos and video. It also has image stabilization and insane auto-focus. One of the reasons this camera is so popular is the slow motion capabilities. If you want interchangeable lens the a6300-and a6500 carry the same sony auto focus that is just rediculous.


G85
Finally this camera is geared more towards video people. It has the least mega pixel count of the two but with the no low pass filter it still can go head to head in pic quality with the other above. One of the biggest features of this camera is the image stabilization, it will blow you away. In addition to IBIS it also has great auto focus and the best touch screen available of a camera, its also sealed and can with stand a "camping" environment.




u/TrueJacksonVP · 1 pointr/space

Honestly, for the price, look into mirrorless cameras like the current Sony alpha series or Panasonic lumix. They’re great cameras, I’ll link a few in a minute here.

Brands like Rokinon make fairly affordable lenses too.

Edit:

$500

$650

$1000

$1050

Seconding what the other commenter said about buying used. I have a Sony A7s ii that I picked up used for just under a grand and it’s been a great camera for both video and photo purposes. Saving up for a Panasonic GH5s next.

Just make sure you research the the camera best suited for what you’d like to do (video, photography) and make sure the lenses you get fit your camera body or you have an adapter (Sony uses E mount lenses and the Lumix cameras take G or micro 4/3s, for example). Get the right speed SD card (if you get a 4k camera - the write speed should preferably be higher than 95mbps) and figure out the kind of lenses best suited to you (zoom lenses are versatile, but prime lenses tend to have better aperture ranges and depth of field).

There are also tons of blogs and videos that can explain everything you need to know.

u/odd_affiliate_link · 0 pointsr/AskReddit

FreddieW uses a DSLR in many of his shoots. Honestly, for $1000 it might not be a bad idea to get a DSLR and a decent lens. 'Pro' video rigs are very expensive (one of the video cameras FreddieW shoots with is ~$5000), and if you're willing to do some work a DSLR-based setup could be easier to work with.

If I were to pick a Nikon, I'd say go with the D5100. It has a swivel LCD which would be helpful for videography. Amazon is having a very good sale right now on bodies + lenses, so you may be able to save on that.

If you do go with a DSLR, make certain that it has a jack for external mic. Some of the entry-level models do not, and that is pretty important for video.

u/CameraRollSoundSpeed · 2 pointsr/videography

I wholeheartedly recommend the Panasonic G7 in that price range. It's not a camcorder, but it records 1080p video continuously (outside of Europe only by default, see /r/PanasonicG7 for a way to enable unlimited 1080p recording with a European model), has full manual control, and even records in 4k (with a time limit of 30min, again there's a workaround over at /r/PanasonicG7). It's also pretty good in low-light, and usually goes for around $500-600 with a lens included if you shop around. Right now, you don't even need to shop around if you live in the U.S., because it's on sale for $597 from Amazon, B&H, Adorama, and all the big camera stores. This is hands-down the best camera you can get for under $750, and is very well recommended around here.

u/Panzerx · 33 pointsr/Filmmakers
  • Canon T2i
  • Rode mic
  • 50mm lens
  • Tripod

    Dslr cameras are the best thing in a price range of $4000 or less. The canon t2i is lower end but has huge bang for buck. You really do want an external recorder for them. Dslr audio is horrible but that rode mic will really improve it, just not as much as external recording. The 50mm lens is the best starting point it is very cheap but looks great. You need a tripod for a dslr because they look horrible hand held unless you have a good stabilization rig or steady cam.
u/Bester2001 · 2 pointsr/Cameras

Overall I'd say the lumix is a great camera. But my experience, Canon's are easier to use, my personal recommendation would be the CANON POWERSHOT S110 they are on the same level, a major plus its almost $200 cheaper and the image quality is superb and equal if not a touch better esp in color reproduction and clarirty. http://snapsort.com/compare/Canon-Powershot-S110-vs-Panasonic-Lumix-DMC-LX7
With the fast apature and larger sensor than most point and shots. Night time photography shouldn't be an issue. Just like any camera even lower end mid range DSLRs the question is how much light you have and are u going to use a flash or tripod.
<br>
http://www.amazon.com/Canon-PowerShot-Digital-Camera-3-Inch/dp/B009B0MYSQ. - best place to find new and a great price too. Also as it has advance modes like Apature Priority and manual mode, learn how to shoot using those lodes vs Program and auto to get the most out of the camera.

Edit: Added amazon listing and tips

u/darti_me · 2 pointsr/Cameras

Being realistic with you're budget, I don't think you can get a camera that fits all your wants. What fits your bill would be a Canon 5DMkIII or a Sony a7II but those cost thousands for just the body. But to try to give you some suggestions, try looking at the D3300 (amazon link) $400 on sale. It takes good photos and the kit lens bundled has VR/OIS/IS. My next recommendation would be a Fuji X30 (amazon link). Its small and light plus the lens that comes with it is really good on paper. I'm not familiar with Canon, Sony, Olympus' line up so try to search for those brand cameras within the same price point.

Now things to keep in mind with my two suggestions.

  • The Nikon's res is x2 of the Fuji's (~24 vs ~12). Now this might seem too lopsided for the Nikon but keep in mind that if you're not doing large prints or scrutinizing each pixel then high resolution is not necessary, you'll simply be able to crop more from the Nikon than the Fuji.


  • Both have VR/IS/OIS and shoot at 1080,60p. However the Fuji has arguably the better lens 28-112mm f2.0-2.8 vs 27-83mm f3.5-5.6. The implication of this is that you have more light to work with the Fuji compared to the Nikon. Aside from that with the Fuji you get more reach since the long end of the lens reaches to 112mm vs 83mm. Note that the actual lens of the Nikon is a 18-55mm but keep in mind that its a crop sensor so I simply multiplied the figure with the crop factor (1.5).


  • The Nikon can change lenses, the Fuji can't. Pretty straight forward, you can buy lenses in the future for the Nikon but your stuck with the Fuji's lens.

    Conclusion. Both are great for your level and needs (albeit no 4K video). Personally for a beginner I really recommend the Nikon one since it has an interchangeable lens system which you can build as you progress in your passion.
u/SecondAvenueSubway · 1 pointr/SecondAvenueSubway

We had a G85 and loved the video quality for the price, but the video autofocus was not great. I didn't realize how not-great it was until we were at a small orgy with some friends and a guy had a Sony a6500. The a6500 tracking AF was (is) far superior. Eventually I saw a floor model or refurbished a6500 and picked it up for about $100 more than I sold the g85 for on Craigslist. One or two of the NSFW videos in our posting history has likely been shot with the G85.

The G85 had a much better touch screen implementation, but the a6500 has considerably better 4K image quality and much better tracking AF. For stills photographers, the difference is likely low, but for video, the Panasonic contract-detect AF is often wobbly and out of focus. In different ways, both the G85 and a6500 are "almost there" cameras.

Edit, forgot to mention that the G85 also has a better rotating screen.

Overall, the G95 looks like a camera that is going to suffer against the a6500, let alone whatever the a6500 successor might be. Already, used a6500s are about $800 - $900. The G95 looks like a little too little, particularly given its weak AF during video performance.

u/Karmakerosene · 2 pointsr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon
  • It's expensive, but a nice digital camera would make spring more enjoyable! I already have one, and I can't wait to take awesome pictures when it gets warmer.
  • My favorite part of spring is not having to wear my winter jacket, not freezing my butt off when I wear of skirt, and walking outside with heels on and not having to worry about slipping on the ice!
u/Mr_Romo · 2 pointsr/Cameras

this Sony a6000 Is super portable and the kit lens it comes with is a good little medium zoom. So for travel photography it is in my opinion the best at the price range, its damn near pocket able. it also has built in wifi which is great for quick uploading to social media if you want. The image quality superb. The auto focus is some of the best around, and at 11fps you shouldn't have to worry about missing a shot due to missing focus.

u/sunjay140 · 3 pointsr/Android

> Honestly, man, how could you be okay with the camera being so shit in your beloved phone?

Because it's not shit and perfectly usable for 99% of smartphone use. This is from a Sony Xperia Z3+. If I want a better camera, I'll just buy a Sony Alpha A6000. I've never understood the smartphone camera craze. Who cares about how good a smartphone's camera is when most people will use it for Snapchat, Instagram and Facebook which ruins your photos anyway. The pictures from a Samsung may look worse than an Xperia after being uploaded to these websites/apps. Get a mirrorless camera is you care so much about image quality.


>Samsung, LG, and pretty much all OEMs are bad at rolling updates, and yes, Sony is good. But the update is not gonna magically let you take a good picture, change a just okay-ish display to a stunning AMOLED display, let the US users access the fingerprint reader.

I like Sony displays. Amoled also gets burn-in. I don't see any difference between an AMOLED and my Xperias. In fact, Samsung phones show the ugly sub-pixel matrix at low resolutions which is non-existent on midrange Xperia phones. I also don't care about the fingerprint scanner. I'm not American and the firmware takes one minute to change.

u/SabishiiFury · 3 pointsr/photography

I'm trying to decide on my first camera (mirrorless), any help would be appreciated. These are the options:

[https://www.ebay.com/itm/Panasonic-LUMIX-DMC-GX7-16-0MP-Digital-Camera-Silver-Body-Only-/282733706288?_trksid=p2349526.m4383.l4275.c10](Lumix DMC-GX7 - Used (body only) 260 Eur) - some kind of a cheap outlier.

PANASONIC LUMIX G7 4K Mirrorless Camera, with 14-42mm MEGA O.I.S. Lens - 540 eur. The lens included has image stabilization, but I'm still a little bit bummed about it not having any stabilization in the body. My always trembling hands are my worst enemy. But then I'm probably exaggerating, it can't be that bad, can it?

OLYMPUS E-M10II (Silver) + 14-42mm IIR (Silver) 579.99 €

This (and a sony 6000 + some fuji) was the only camera I got to hold and I was blown away by the way it (and sony, fuji really sucked) sat in my hand, it was just perfect and the fact that it felt secure when held by just one hand left a good impression on me. However, I didn't try any of its functions, and I don't know how good is the lens. I am thinking about this and the G7 as my first and cheapest options. The main things that I have for olympus is that I can buy it here from a physical store and the ergonomics. The G7 though I would buy because it has more features (as in my list below), but I have no clue how well it's going to be ergonomics-wise and how well will the lack of in-body stabilization work.


Fujifilm X-T20 Silver+XC 16-50mm F3.5-5.6 OIS II Black Lens 790 €

This has APS-C (I don't really know if there's much difference between this and 4/3, but still nice), but doesn't have an in-body stabilizer. And only tilting lcd, and that's it? Wait why am I even considering this...

Panasonic Lumix G85 961€

Things that make me consider Lumix G85:

 - Environmental sealing. I Would absolutely love to use my camera in rain and snow. Or can it be done even if there is no sealing? Neither my phone or headphones had ever had any issues, and they're constantly under pouring rain.


 - Fully articulated display. I don't even know why I want this - I'm not a big selfie fan, and I don't film videos, but just the thought of someday wanting to and already being able to do so with the resources already under my possession makes me feel a tad bit "future proof"... I've never had a "real" camera so I don't know what things I could think of doing with it. What if not having such a screen would limit something I'd want to do at some point, for example taking a picture of something on ground level, or stealth mode?


 - Image stabilizer. I've read that having body stabilization is a lot better than having a lens stabilization, and I myself would feel a little bit more secure knowing that I can buy any lens and not be limited to only those that have inner stabilization.


 - Possibility that there are some new technologies in it that you couldn't find in older models (taking still shots from a 4k video, for example, or


 - Battery saving mode)


It's all good, but is it worth paying twice for all of this? 

Is there something else I might be forgetting right now? I'm leaning towards G7 right now.. I'd probably pick sony a6300 if it only had touch screen (navigating through menu with only buttons has been a pain in the ass in my experience)

I want to use it for travel and occasional portrait/landscape photo

Sours: https://redditbests.com/digital-cameras/
5 Creepy Videos Found on Reddit

The Photographer’s Guide to Reddit

This is a chapter from my Photographer’s Guide to Social Media & Marketing.

Reddit is a great website to market yourself as a photographer and to get feedback on your photos.

But there are rules.

If you are new to Reddit, let me explain how it works.

How Reddit works

Reddit is a website where anyone is able to make a board based on a theme like “Photography”.

Everyone can subscribe to that board and the community submits links to the board, based on the subreddit’s rules.

Where to share your photography successfully

The subreddits I list here, are the ones relevant for photographers.

Reddit can be a really good place to showcase your work, as long as you follow the rules and only post your best content.

#1 ITAP (I took a Picture)

I Took A Picture, is pretty self-explanatory.
It’s a subreddit where people post photos they have taken. ITAP is perfect for photographers who want to share their work.

The rules for submitting your photographs to  ITAP (I took a picture):

  • You can only share photographs
    • No paintings, illustrations or heavily edited images.
  • A photograph that you took.
  • A single photograph.
  • A photograph that demonstrates an effort to teach/learn technique or artistic style, or which is being shared as an example of quality photography
  • Your submission must include “ITAP” at the beginning of your title and you should only describe the contents of the image

As I’m writing this, ITAP has 700000 followers. Go to ITAP.

#2 Photo Critique

Photo Critique is as the name says; a place for you to get other peoples opinion about your photo and for you to give feedback to other peoples photos.

As I’m writing this, Photo Critique has 200.000 subscribes photography enthusiast.
Visit Photo Critique. Click here.

#3 Photography

/r/Photography/ This is a place to politely discuss the gear, technique & tools, and culture of photography.

I’d advise you not to post your own stuff there unless it’s educational or you have an intent to start a discussion. /r/photography/ is heavily moderated and it’s important you obey the rules. That’s said, the photography subreddit is a great place for discussions and to learn.

#4 Pics

/r/pics/ is the biggest subreddit for pictures with 18.000.000 photographers. It’s extremely difficult to hit the homepage of /r/pics because the competition is crazy and it takes an amazing photograph to do so.

Pics: Find it here.

#5 Non-related, but important subreddits

When you decide which subreddit(s) to share your photo in, think about the topic and context of your photo. I shared this photo-series in the Mexico subreddit.

The Mexico subreddit has nothing to do with photography, but my photos take place in Mexico. The post I submitted there, did really good in terms of new followers.

Other subreddits that might be relevant to you, is the brand of your camera. You can find Fujifilm, Canon, Leica, Olympus, Nikon, Sony and many more.

Important:
Don’t link to your blog. Use image-hosting websites

Most photography subreddits includes the following rules:

(We won’t allow blog hosting of images or blogspam, but links to albums on image hosting websites are okay.)

When you post your own work on Reddit, it’s best to use an image hosting website, like Flickr, Imgur or Reddit’s own upload. I prefer sharing my photos via. Flickr. It gives me a chance that someone might want to follow me or see more of my work.

This is an example of a Flickr photo of mine, I shared on Reddit.

That’s it for my reddit guide for photographers.

As a photographer, Reddit can be an amazing place to improve your skills, get exposure and do a little marketing. If you to read more about marketing for photographers, take a look at my Instagram marketing guide.

Get my Photographers to guide to Social Media & Marketing.

Sours: https://trovatten.com/reddit/

Reddit best camera

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Top 10 Reddit Conspiracy Theories That Might Actually Be True

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