Fulper pottery lamp

Fulper pottery lamp DEFAULT

Fulper Pottery Table Lamps

Best known for its stylish Vasekraft line, Fulper Pottery was a major producer of American art pottery, which grew out of the Arts and Crafts movement in the United States. Like the Rookwood, Roseville and Van Briggle Potteries, the Flemington, New Jersey–based Fulper flourished from the 1870s through the 1920s. During that period, U.S. consumers favored the fluid forms and cool color palette of Art Nouveau ceramics, as well as the practicality of the Craftsman style. Unlike studio ceramics, in which each piece is hand thrown on a potter’s wheel, most art pottery — including Fulper’s creations — was made using molds, yielding identical forms that were glazed in distinctive patterns like the butterscotch and cat’s-eye combination displayed in this 1915 example.

The company that became Fulper Pottery was founded in 1841. A manufacturer of utilitarian ceramics ranging from crockery to drain pipes, it was bought in 1960 by Abram Fulper, who changed its name from Samuel Hill Pottery and retooled it to make more refined ceramics using the region’s red clay. Incorporated as Fulper Pottery Co. in 1899 under the leadership of Abram’s two sons, it produced attractive utilitarian household ware such as its line of Fire-Proof Cookware and its Germ-Proof Filter, a sort of early water cooler used in public places. The firm made its first forays into art pottery with a line of glazed vessels created by its master potter, John Kunsman, pieces from which were shown at the 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition and won an honorable mention. At that time, a series of world’s fairs and museum shows were fueling a fascination among the public with East Asian art and design. In response, the American Art Pottery community began producing wares with glazes that recalled the brilliant colors and shimmering surfaces of Chinese ceramics. Fulper’s entry was its Vasekraft line, which launched in 1909.

Unfortunately, the original glazes employed were not entirely successful and, even more important, were expensive to produce. In the 1910s, Fulper’s new ceramic engineer, Martin Stangl, revamped the Vasekraft line withglazes less like the Chinese and more akin to those of Roseville and Rookwood pottery, with more uniform coloration and matte surfaces. His designs ranged from bookends to candle holders, desk accessories, and lamps, all of which remained popular into the 1920s. Following World War I, Fulper introduced new lines, such as Fulper Pottery Artware and Fulper Porcelaines, which were marketed specifically to women and featured delicate items for a fashionable dressing table, as well a solid-color Fulper Fayence. After William Fulper’s death, in 1928, Martin Stangl was named president, and in 1935 the Stangl Pottery line became the company’s only product. In 1978, it was purchased by Pfaltzgraff.

Sours: https://www.1stdibs.com/creators/fulper-pottery/furniture/lighting/table-lamps/
Our article "Fulper's Gift Box Pottery" was published in the Fall 2019 issue of the Journal of the American Art Pottery Association. Click the pic:Our article "Fulper's Marking System" was published in the Winter 2017 issue of the Journal of the American Art Pottery Association. Click the pic: Our article "Fulper's First Fifteen" was published in the Spring 2013 issue of the Journal of the American Art Pottery Association. Click the pic:Our article "Fulper's Vasekraft Lamps" was published in the Spring 2012 issue of the Journal of the American Art Pottery Association. Click the pic:

 

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The Fulper Pottery Company of Flemington, New Jersey produced art pottery circa 1910-1935. Fulper's "VaseKraft" pottery is distinguished by high-quality and innovative glazes applied to a variety of forms.

Fulper.net was developed to encourage the appreciation of Fulper pottery. It offers examples of Fulper's best work, guidance on evaluating individual pieces, an exploration of the history and evolution of Fulper's VaseKraft line, and a unique Fulper VaseKraft Lamp Gallery. There is no commercial purpose and no prices or values are included. Questions about Fulper pottery in general or specific pieces will gladly be answered.

Email Fulper.net at [email protected]

Photo copyrights are held by the original photographers, and photo contributions are appreciated. Please support the auctioneers, dealers and museums listed on the links page. Very special thanks to David Rago - Craftsman Auctions for the generous lending of photographs.

This site is under construction -- but visit our ever-expanding Fulper VaseKraft Lamp Gallery and the Forms and Pottery pages !

Brought to you by Jon Kornacki and David Kornacki (www.RoycroftCopper.com)

Sours: https://www.fulper.net/
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Fulper Pottery

Despite being one of the oldest potteries in America, Fulper arrived rather late to the art pottery movement. It was originally founded in 1814 as Samuel Hill Pottery in downtown Flemington, New Jersey and built its initial success on producing drain tiles and other utilitarian objects. It was acquired by Hill’s partner, Abraham Fulper in 1860 and after his death in 1881, the firm was shepherded to greater heights by his son, William. William was interested in the technical aspects of ceramic production and began designing shapes and studying glaze technology via the writings of Professor Charles F. Binns of Alfred University. It took years of experimentation, but in 1909 the Fulper Pottery Company finally released its first art line, dubbed Vasekraft. It was an immediate success.

Fulper had hit upon the perfect combination of high quality wares and expedient production. Unlike many of the other nearly 200 companies and studios creating art pottery in America at the time, Fulper was production-oriented and focused almost exclusively on simple, molded forms adorned by a myriad of unique glazes. There were six categories of glazes—Mirror, Flambé, Matte, Wistaria, and Crystalline—and colors within those ranges were given their own names, such as Elephant’s Breath, Cat’s Eye, Blue of the Sky, and Mirrored Black. An almost infinite number of combinations could be achieved by combining or overlapping different glazes on one form.

Fulper was staffed by about seventy-five people by 1911 and business remained strong through the late 1920s. The firm offered a variety of vases, bowls, candleholders, bookends, and other forms, but perhaps the finest objects they made were lamps. Gorgeous but incredibly fragile, not many have survived. The bases and shades were entirely made of pottery (an impressive technical achievement) and inset with jewel-toned glass, creating a beautiful juxtaposition of colors and textures. They were first introduced around Christmas in 1910 to great fanfare, praised by one writer as “possessed of a beauty not to be escaped or ignored by anyone with a normal love of things lovely.”

William Fulper died in 1928, the year in which operations expanded to Trenton, New Jersey. J. Martin Stangl, superintendent of Fulper’s technical division, bought the firm in 1930 and continued to produce art ware in smaller amounts through 1935. The Fulper Pottery Company was formally registered as the Stangl Pottery Company in 1955 and remained in operation until 1978. Though Stangl attained success in his own right, the level of quality achieved in the 1910s and 1920s was never repeated.

Auction Results Fulper Pottery

Sours: https://www.ragoarts.com/auctions/2019/11/masterworks-of-american-craft/35
Meteor Lamp - OJO ceramics - Home Pottery Studio Vlog - Crazy Glaze

Fulper Pottery

Despite being one of the oldest potteries in America, Fulper arrived rather late to the art pottery movement. It was originally founded in 1814 as Samuel Hill Pottery in downtown Flemington, New Jersey and built its initial success on producing drain tiles and other utilitarian objects. It was acquired by Hill’s partner, Abraham Fulper in 1860 and after his death in 1881, the firm was shepherded to greater heights by his son, William. William was interested in the technical aspects of ceramic production and began designing shapes and studying glaze technology via the writings of Professor Charles F. Binns of Alfred University. It took years of experimentation, but in 1909 the Fulper Pottery Company finally released its first art line, dubbed Vasekraft. It was an immediate success.

Fulper had hit upon the perfect combination of high quality wares and expedient production. Unlike many of the other nearly 200 companies and studios creating art pottery in America at the time, Fulper was production-oriented and focused almost exclusively on simple, molded forms adorned by a myriad of unique glazes. There were six categories of glazes—Mirror, Flambé, Matte, Wistaria, and Crystalline—and colors within those ranges were given their own names, such as Elephant’s Breath, Cat’s Eye, Blue of the Sky, and Mirrored Black. An almost infinite number of combinations could be achieved by combining or overlapping different glazes on one form.

Fulper was staffed by about seventy-five people by 1911 and business remained strong through the late 1920s. The firm offered a variety of vases, bowls, candleholders, bookends, and other forms, but perhaps the finest objects they made were lamps. Gorgeous but incredibly fragile, not many have survived. The bases and shades were entirely made of pottery (an impressive technical achievement) and inset with jewel-toned glass, creating a beautiful juxtaposition of colors and textures. They were first introduced around Christmas in 1910 to great fanfare, praised by one writer as “possessed of a beauty not to be escaped or ignored by anyone with a normal love of things lovely.”

William Fulper died in 1928, the year in which operations expanded to Trenton, New Jersey. J. Martin Stangl, superintendent of Fulper’s technical division, bought the firm in 1930 and continued to produce art ware in smaller amounts through 1935. The Fulper Pottery Company was formally registered as the Stangl Pottery Company in 1955 and remained in operation until 1978. Though Stangl attained success in his own right, the level of quality achieved in the 1910s and 1920s was never repeated.

Auction Results Fulper Pottery

Sours: https://www.ragoarts.com/auctions/2021/05/early-20th-century-design/217

Lamp fulper pottery

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Meteor Lamp - OJO ceramics - Home Pottery Studio Vlog - Crazy Glaze

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