Animations roblox

Animations roblox DEFAULT

Creating Animations

Creating animations is like posing an action figure. For this tutorial, you’ll create two poses. When the game runs, Roblox Studio will connect the poses together to create an animation.

Set Up the Animation Editor

The poses and the final animation will be created using the Animation Editor.

  1. To find the Animation Editor, select the Plugins tab.
  1. Click on the Animation Editor.

The Animation Editor will open at the bottom of your screen.

  1. Next, you need a character to animate. On the pedestal, one has already been set up for you. Select the figure on top.

The camera will focus on the selected figure, and the part names that make up the figure will appear in the animation editor.

Preparing To Pose

Before creating the poses, make it easier to pose figures by changing a program setting and then position the camera.

  1. In the Model tab, find the Snap to Grid section. Make sure Rotate and Move are not checked.
  1. Using the camera controls, move the camera to get a good view of the part you want to animate. When moving, hold to slow down camera movements.
ActionControl
Move
RotateHold the right mouse button and look around
ZoomUse the scroll wheel
FocusPress to focus the camera on a specific part

If the camera doesn’t move when you press , click somewhere inside the game world.



Previous Test the Game Next Create the First Pose

Sours: https://developer.roblox.com/en-us/resources/build-it-play-it/2020summer/tier-1/creating-animations

Advanced Animation in Games

Hello! I’m PineappleDoge, and I’m an animator! Animation is the gateway between the player and a game-world, allowing them to feel emotionally involved. For many new developers, adding animations can often come in these forms:

  • Custom enemy animations (walk, idle, attack, all that jazz)
  • Animations for custom player moves (insert any skill moves here/flashy move)
  • Actions that can’t be fully explained without it (lifting up a box, throwing an object)

These animations are essential, but are only scratching the surface of what animation can do on the Roblox platform. I’ve learned that animation is a big factor in a game’s sense of immersion. While certain games don’t need to be immersive to be great, players love to feel involved in the games that they play and the world that you build. To see how animation boosts immersion, we’ll look at the genre of MMORPGs in Roblox, which offers many opportunities for players to feel engaged.

Tip 1: Keep Animations Informative and Snappy

No one likes waiting. One of the worst feelings in a game is encountering delays. You might not know if it’s you, or the game not responding. A simple way to combat this issue is by letting the player know that their input, whether it’s a sword swing or a button click, was received. Even if it’s something small like a color change or a slight shake, these small animations add up to help make your game feel more responsive.

While adding many effects and details can be fun, keep in mind the initial goal of your animation and how it improves your game. If it’s meant to be a quick sword slash, don’t have excessive windup before actually swinging. If it doesn’t work for what it’s intended for, it needs to be revised.

Tip 2: Don’t Limit Yourself to 3D Character Animation

When you’re animating for a game, it’s obvious to think of animating the player, NPCs, and mobs, but I see so many developers overlook an underexplored animation medium on Roblox: the art of animating the User Interface (UI). Having interesting and responsive UI animation can really make a game “pop!”

In addition to providing information in a clear and concise way, it can also make the simple act of traversing through menus feel like a blast! Even doing something as simple as playing an effect tween when you hover over a button or having a loading bar in loading screens can go a long way.

In the example above, notice how extra effects make a menu feel more interesting. Small animations like these make the game feel more responsive to players and eliminate moments of “Is it me, or is the game just not responding?”

Having animated effects can be especially useful in games where the player has downtime before being able to experience the game (such as load screens). In the example below, a little bobble to the text label adds a bit of livelihood to this screen.

This little animation gets the job done by giving the player visual information about the progress, but it could be improved. We could add more flashy colors or a gradient to give it more flair, or we could use some advanced UI techniques, such as 2D sprite sheets!

One great resource on advanced techniques and tweening UI is Introduction to 2D Animation by Roblox developer Kenami. I highly recommend giving it a read!

Tip 3: Let Animations Tell the Player About Your Game Mechanics

Does your game have a stamina system? Perhaps it has weight types that separate heavy and light weapons? Or maybe it has elemental strengths and weaknesses? If your game has any of the above, why not take advantage of these weapons by giving each weapon type a different “animation kit” to differentiate each weapon? If you’re going to have a big heavy blade on the player, let your players know it’s going to deal a LOT of damage by giving it a powerful animation!

For example, say you have a system or status effects that are less notable, but still play a big role in the game (such as running out of stamina or being set on-fire). While having a UI pop up to let the player know “Your stamina is depleted, wait a bit for it to regenerate” can get the message across, it risks taking away a game’s immersion. Instead, have the avatar play a tired or panting animation when they run out of stamina, or have the avatar move erratically if it’s caught fire. This will help get the message across without pulling the player out of their immersion in the game.

Tip 4: Use Animation to Turn Good Actions Into Great Actions

If you’re making an MMORPG, chances are that the core of your game follows this general format:

  • Player fights and kills monsters/other players.
  • Player gets rewards such as money and experience.
  • Player uses those rewards to get better stats and kill more monsters.

If your game is mainly PVE or PVP focused, sell the impact of your player’s attacks with animations in a way that reflects the weight of that player’s weapon. Additionally, a good attack animation can be made so much better with good sounds, effects, and a good recoil animation for the enemy.

This doesn’t just have to apply to just combat animations though. Does your game have a double jump? Why not add a separate animation to show the difference between your normal and double jump? Taking extra time to refine certain aspects of your game with great animation makes a game feel more polished and engaging to players.

Conclusion

Ultimately, I believe there’s a lot of untapped potential on the Roblox platform when it comes to animation and improving the player experience. There are so many things you can do to boost immersion by using animation I didn’t even touch in this article, but I think this is a good start for anyone looking to upgrade their game’s animation.

Big thanks to @Reds on Twitter, @CupFei on Twitter, @Miratsui, and @RobloxJed for giving me valuable insight, and I hope this article showed you some neat implementations of animations in your game. Thanks for reading, and have a great day!

Sours: https://developer.roblox.com/en-us/resources/build-it-play-it/2020summer/tier-3/advanced-animation
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Using Animations in Games

Animations truly bring a game to life. From easily-accessible character animations in the catalog to detailed animations built with the , Roblox offers a variety of powerful animation options.

Changing Default Animations

By default, Roblox player characters include common animations like running, climbing, swimming, and jumping. However, these animations are not locked in place — if desired, you can replace them with catalog animations or even load in your own .

To change a default character animation, you’ll first need to locate the desired animation’s asset ID.

Catalog Animations

To use a catalog animation, locate its asset ID as outlined on the reference page.

Custom Animations

To use a custom animation built with the , locate its asset ID as follows:

  1. Click the button in the upper-left section of the Animation Editor window.
  1. Select Export from the context menu.
  2. Decide whether to create a new animation or overwrite an existing one.
  3. Once the upload is complete, copy the asset ID by clicking the “copy” button in the export window.

Changing a Default Animation

Once you have a valid animation asset ID, you can easily replace any of the default Roblox character animations:

  1. Insert a into ServerScriptService containing the following code:
local Players = game:GetService("Players") local function onCharacterAdded(character) local humanoid = character:WaitForChild("Humanoid") for _, playingTracks in pairs(humanoid:GetPlayingAnimationTracks()) do playingTracks:Stop(0) end local animateScript = character:WaitForChild("Animate") end local function onPlayerAdded(player) player.CharacterAppearanceLoaded:Connect(onCharacterAdded) end Players.PlayerAdded:Connect(onPlayerAdded)

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  1. Starting on line 11, replace the desired default animation(s) by resetting the Animate script’s values to the corresponding asset ID.

The following reference chart lists the default animations which can be replaced, for instance .

Character ActionAnimate Script References
Cheer
Climb
Dance
Fall
Idle
Jump
Laugh
Point
Run
Sit
Swim
Tools
Walk
Wave

local Players = game:GetService("Players") local function onCharacterAdded(character) local humanoid = character:WaitForChild("Humanoid") for _, playingTracks in pairs(humanoid:GetPlayingAnimationTracks()) do playingTracks:Stop(0) end local animateScript = character:WaitForChild("Animate") animateScript.run.RunAnim.AnimationId = "rbxassetid://616163682" -- RunanimateScript.walk.WalkAnim.AnimationId = "rbxassetid://616168032" -- WalkanimateScript.jump.JumpAnim.AnimationId = "rbxassetid://616161997" -- JumpanimateScript.idle.Animation1.AnimationId = "rbxassetid://616158929" -- Idle (Variation 1)animateScript.idle.Animation2.AnimationId = "rbxassetid://616160636" -- Idle (Variation 2)animateScript.fall.FallAnim.AnimationId = "rbxassetid://616157476" -- FallanimateScript.swim.Swim.AnimationId = "rbxassetid://616165109" -- Swim (Active)animateScript.swimidle.SwimIdle.AnimationId = "rbxassetid://616166655" -- Swim (Idle)animateScript.climb.ClimbAnim.AnimationId = "rbxassetid://616156119" -- Climb end local function onPlayerAdded(player) player.CharacterAppearanceLoaded:Connect(onCharacterAdded) end Players.PlayerAdded:Connect(onPlayerAdded)

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Using Animation Weight

Multiple animations may be used for the same action — note, for instance, that there are two default “idle” animations. When multiple animations exist for a character state, the Animate script will randomly choose which one to play, although the outcome can be influenced by changing the animation’s Weight value.

When assigning weight values, the probability of an animation being chosen is:

animation weight / total weight of all state animations

In the script below, this means that will play ⅓ of the time the character is idle, while will play ⅔ of the time.

local function onCharacterAdded(character) local humanoid = character:WaitForChild("Humanoid") for _, playingTracks in pairs(humanoid:GetPlayingAnimationTracks()) do playingTracks:Stop(0) end local animateScript = character:WaitForChild("Animate") animateScript.idle.Animation1.AnimationId = "rbxassetid://5432167890" animateScript.idle.Animation2.AnimationId = "rbxassetid://1234509876" -- Assign weight of 5 to "idle.Animation1" animateScript.idle.Animation1.Weight.Value = 5 -- Assign weight of 10 to "idle.Animation2" animateScript.idle.Animation2.Weight.Value = 10 end

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Playing Animations Directly

In some cases you’ll need to play an animation directly from inside a script, for instance when the player presses a certain key, picks up a special item, etc.

Humanoids

To play an animation on a rig containing a object, such as typical player characters, load the animation via . Consider the following which may be placed in :

local Players = game:GetService("Players") local player = Players.LocalPlayer local character = player.Character if not character or not character.Parent then character = player.CharacterAdded:Wait() end local humanoid = character:WaitForChild("Humanoid") local animator = humanoid:WaitForChild("Animator") -- Create new "Animation" instance local kickAnimation = Instance.new("Animation") -- Set its "AnimationId" to the corresponding animation asset ID kickAnimation.AnimationId = "rbxassetid://2515090838" -- Load animation onto the animator local kickAnimationTrack = animator:LoadAnimation(kickAnimation) -- Play animation track kickAnimationTrack:Play() -- If a named event was defined for the animation, connect it to "GetMarkerReachedSignal()" kickAnimationTrack:GetMarkerReachedSignal("KickEnd"):Connect(function(paramString) print(paramString) end)

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This code waits for the local player’s object to load, then it creates a new instance with the proper . The animation is then loaded onto the , creating an , and the track is played with . This script also utilizes the function to detect when a specific occurs.

Non-Humanoids

Playing animations on rigs that do not contain a must be done by creating an with a child . Consider this simple which is assumed to be a direct child of the rig:

local rig = script.Parent -- Destroy the humanoid object if it exists local humanoid = rig:FindFirstChildOfClass("Humanoid") if humanoid then humanoid:Destroy() end -- Create new "Animation" instance local kickAnimation = Instance.new("Animation") -- Set its "AnimationId" to the corresponding animation asset ID kickAnimation.AnimationId = "rbxassetid://2515090838" -- Create a new "AnimationController" and "Animator" local animController = Instance.new("AnimationController")animController.Parent = riglocal animator = Instance.new("Animator")animator.Parent = animController -- Load animation onto the animator local kickAnimationTrack = animator:LoadAnimation(kickAnimation) -- Play animation track kickAnimationTrack:Play() -- If a named event was defined for the animation, connect it to "GetMarkerReachedSignal" kickAnimationTrack:GetMarkerReachedSignal("KickEnd"):Connect(function(paramString) print(paramString) end)

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Animations cannot be loaded through both a and on the same rig. The script above handles this by looking for and destroying a object which may exist.

Sours: https://developer.roblox.com/en-us/articles/using-animations-in-games
ROBLOX LIFE : The Bitter Truth - Animation

Animation

An object that references an animation asset (AnimationId) which can be loaded by a or

Should I load an Animation on the client or server?

In order for to replicate correctly, it’s important to know when they should be loaded on the client (via a) or on the server (via a ).

If an is a descendant of a Humanoid or AnimationController in a Player’s then animations started on that Player’s client will be replicated to the server and other clients.

If the Animator is not a descendant of a player character, its animations must be loaded and started on the server to replicate.

The Animator object must be initially created on the server and replicated to clients for animation replication to work at all. If an Animator is created locally, then AnimationTracks loaded with that Animator will not replicate.

Both and will create an Animator if one does not already exist. When calling LoadAnimation from LocalScripts you need to be careful to wait for the Animator to replicate from the server before calling LoadAnimation if you want character animations to replicate. You can do this with WaitForChild(“Animator”).

See also

Properties

This property is the content ID of the animation an object is referencing. Once an animation has been created and uploaded to Roblox the content ID can be found in the uploaded animation’s URL.

Inherited from Instance:ShowHide

Determines if an can be cloned using or saved to file.

A read-only string representing the class this belongs to

The cost of saving the instance using data persistence.

A non-unique identifier of the

Determines the hierarchical parent of the

A deprecated property that used to protect objects

Functions

Inherited from Instance:ShowHide

Create a copy of an object and all its descendants, ignoring objects that are not

Sets the property to nil, locks the property, disconnects all connections and calls Destroy on all children.

Sours: https://developer.roblox.com/en-us/api-reference/class/Animation

Roblox animations

Adding Animations

To implement animations in-game, use scripts. For this tutorial, you’ll add your victory animation into a game using a pre-made script. Once finished, this animation can be used to celebrate a player’s accomplishment, like reaching the end of an obby or finding a secret.

This guide covers step-by-step how to add and modify a script. It assumes some previous knowledge of scripting and isn’t intended to teach these concepts.

For your own game, you may need to make modifications to this script. To better understand scripting, we recommend going through the Code Fundamentals series.


Scripting Animations

Set up the Project

  1. To organize all parts that will play the animation, add a folder in Workspace (hover over Workspace and click ) named TouchPartFolder.

The script provided later will play feedback for any parts in this folder that are touched. This makes organizing your game easier than attaching a script onto an individual part.


  1. In TouchPartFolder, add a part.
  1. Make sure the part is placed where playing the animation would make sense, such as the end of a level or near an object players collect.
  1. This first script attaches a event to any parts in the TouchPartFolder. Once a player touches any part there, it’ll play an animation.

To add the script, in StarterPlayerStarterCharacterScripts, create a LocalScript named TouchPartRegister. Then copy and paste the code below.

-- Used with "PlayerAnimationFeedback" script to play animations on part touches -- Services local ReplicatedStorage = game:GetService("ReplicatedStorage") local Players = game:GetService("Players") local player = Players.LocalPlayer local character = player.Character or player.Character:Wait() local humanoid = character:WaitForChild("Humanoid") local canTouch = false -- Include feedback animation module local PlayerAnimationFeedback = require(ReplicatedStorage:WaitForChild("PlayerAnimationFeedback")) -- Function called when a part is touched local function onPartTouch(otherPart) if humanoid and canTouch == false then canTouch = true PlayerAnimationFeedback:PlayAnimation() canTouch = false end end -- On startup, call animation module load function PlayerAnimationFeedback:LoadAnimation(humanoid) -- Also bind a folder of parts to the "Touched" event to run "onPartTouch()" local touchPartFolder = workspace:WaitForChild("TouchPartFolder") local touchParts = touchPartFolder:GetChildren() for objectIndex = 1, #touchParts do local touchPart = touchParts[objectIndex] touchPart.Touched:Connect(onPartTouch) end

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  1. The next script triggers animations for a player. In ReplicatedStorage, create a new ModuleScript named PlayerAnimationFeedback. Then, copy and paste the code below.
-- Used with "TouchPartRegister" script to play animations for a player local PlayerAnimationFeedback = {} local feedbackAnimationTrack local ANIMATION_FADE = 0.3 local ANIMATION_ID = "rbxassetid://YOUR_ANIMATION" -- Function to load animation onto player's character function PlayerAnimationFeedback:LoadAnimation(humanoid) local feedbackAnimation = Instance.new("Animation") feedbackAnimation.AnimationId = ANIMATION_ID feedbackAnimationTrack = humanoid:LoadAnimation(feedbackAnimation) feedbackAnimationTrack.Priority = Enum.AnimationPriority.Action feedbackAnimationTrack.Looped = false end -- Function to play the animation function PlayerAnimationFeedback:PlayAnimation() feedbackAnimationTrack:Play(ANIMATION_FADE) wait(feedbackAnimationTrack.Length) end return PlayerAnimationFeedback

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Previous Improve and Export Next Playing Animations

Sours: https://developer.roblox.com/en-us/resources/build-it-play-it/2020summer/tier-2/animations-and-feedback/adding-animations
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Using the Animation Editor

Roblox Studio features a powerful, built-inAnimation Editor which allows you to design and publish custom animations.

Model Requirements

The animation editor can be used for both stock human characters or non-human models, as long as all moving parts are connected with objects. Assuming your model is compatible, follow these steps to begin creating an animation:

  1. Click the Animation Editor button in the Plugins tab.
  1. Select the rig to define animations for.
  2. If prompted, type in a new animation name and click Create in the dialog.
  3. The editor window will open, showing a tracklist and the animation timeline.

If you’re new to Roblox animation, it’s recommended that you start with one of the default rigs created through the Build Rig button in the Plugins tab. These rigs already contain the basic parts and mechanisms to build a character animation.


Creating Poses

To animate a rig, you’ll need to define poses by moving/rotating specific parts like the head, right hand, left foot, etc. When the animation runs, it will smoothly animate the rig from pose to pose.

Consider a simple animation where a human character turns its head 45° to the left. This animation involves two poses — the initial position of the head (looking forward) and the turned position of the head (looking left).

To create a new pose:

  1. Move the scrubber bar to the time/frame position where you want to set the pose, for example 0:15. By default, timeline units are expressed as seconds:frames and animations run at 30 frames per second, so 0:15 indicates ½ second.
  1. Hover your mouse over the rig and click on a part to select it.
  2. Move and/or rotate the part to the desired orientation. When you do so, a track will be created and a new keyframe will be created along the timeline, indicated by the diamond symbol.

While setting poses, you can toggle between Move and Rotate modes by pressing + or + respectively (+ or + on Mac). These modes work exactly like moving/rotating base objects, including the snap settings and incremental values located in the Snap to Grid section of the Model tab.

  1. Continue moving or rotating parts until you get the desired pose. Whenever you adjust a specific part, a keyframe is defined for that part at the selected time/frame.
  2. When you’re ready to preview the animation, press the small Play button in the upper-left section of the editor window. Animations can also be played/paused with .

By default, the timeline displays a duration of 1 second (30 frames), although the animation’s actual duration will be determined by the final keyframe. To add more time to the timeline view, enter a new value in the right-side box of the position indicator:


Working With Keyframes

Once you define basic poses for a rig, fine-tuning individual keyframes can significantly improve the final animation.

Adding Keyframes

As shown in the poses section above, keyframes are automatically added when you change a part’s orientation anywhere along the timeline. In addition, keyframes can be added as follows:

  • For a single part of the rig, move the scrubber bar to a new position, click the button for a track, and select Add Keyframe.
  • For multiple parts of the rig, right-click in the region above the tracks and select Add Keyframe Here. Note that the keyframes will be inserted at the time/frame closest to where you click, not at the position of the scrubber bar.

Moving Keyframes

To increase or decrease the amount of time between a keyframe and a neighboring keyframe:

  1. Click on any keyframe in the timeline. Alternatively, you can select all keyframes at a specific position by clicking the diamond symbol in the upper bar. Selected keyframes will be surrounded with a blue border.
  1. Drag the keyframe(s) left or right into a new position.

Copying Keyframes

A specific keyframe (or keyframes for multiple parts) can be copied and pasted to a new position in the timeline.

  1. Select one or more keyframes as outlined in step #1 of the section above.
  2. Press +(+ on Mac).
  3. Move the scrubber bar to a new position.
  4. Press +(+ on Mac). The keyframe(s) will be copied to that position.

Deleting Keyframes

One or more keyframes can be deleted by simply selecting them and pressing or .

Animation Easing

Easing is an important concept in animation. By default, a part will move/rotate from one keyframe to the next in an even, steady motion known as linear easing.

As you can see, linear easing makes the character’s kick animation appear stiff and robotic. While that may look appropriate for some motions, compare the following video where cubic easing is applied to make the leg animate more naturally.

To change easing for one or more keyframes:

  1. Select the keyframe(s).
  2. Right-click and choose an option from the Easing Style and/or Easing Direction context menus.
Easing StyleDescription
LinearMoves at a constant speed.
ConstantRemoves interpolation between the selected keyframe and next keyframe (animation will "snap" from keyframe to keyframe).
CubicEases in or out with cubic interpolation.
ElasticMoves as if the object is attached to a rubber band.
BounceMoves as if the start or end position of the tween is bouncy.
Easing DirectionDescription
OutThe motion will be faster at the beginning and slower toward the end.
InOutIn and Out on the same tween, with In at the beginning and Out taking effect halfway through.
InThe motion will be slower at the beginning and faster toward the end.

Inverse Kinematics

When animating characters, inverse kinematics (IK) can help calculate rotations for neighboring joints in order to get one specific joint to a desired location.

To begin editing an animation in IK mode:

  1. Click the IK button in the animation editor.
  1. Near the bottom of the window that opens, click Enable IK.

IK Modes

IK features both Body Part mode (exclusive to rigs) and Full Body mode. This can be toggled from the IK window.

Body Part ModeFull Body Mode
Isolates movement to related limbs. For example, moving the RightHand part will only affect parts that compose the right arm.The IK solver will consider all joints when moving a specific part. However, you may exclude specific parts from this process by pinning them (see below).

Pinning Parts

When editing an animation in Full Body mode, you can pin a part to make it immovable. In the following video, both feet are pinned and remain stationary while moving other parts, but either foot can still be directly manipulated.

To pin a specific part, click the pin icon next to its name. Remember that Full Body mode must be enabled to use this feature.

To return to “forward kinematics” mode, click on Disable IK near the bottom of the IK window. Note that this will not remove any manipulations you made while in IK mode — that data will remain stored in any keyframes which were created while IK was applied.


Animation Settings

Looping

When designing an animation in the editor, you can toggle on the Looping button to make it automatically loop:

Note that a looping animation will not interpolate between the final keyframes and first keyframes. Therefore, it's recommended that you copy the first keyframes and use them as the final keyframes so that the animation loops smoothly.

Priority

In an actual game, you’ll probably use unique animations for different player actions and states, for instance a jump animation and an “idle” animation. Logically, the jump animation should take priority over the idle animation so that characters don’t perform both at the same time.

You can set one of four priority levels as follows:

  1. Click the button in the upper-left section of the editor window.
  1. Choose an option from the Set Animation Priority menu. In a game, if you play an animation with a higher priority than one that’s already playing, the new animation will override the old.

lowest priority

highest priority

CoreIdleMovementAction

Animation Events

Animation event markers can be defined across the timeline span and can be used to detect those markers as the animation runs.

Showing Events

By default, the event track isn’t visible. To reveal it:

  1. Click the gear button to the right of the timeline.
  1. Select Show Animation Events. This will open the events bar directly below the control bar.

Creating Events

To create a new event marker:

  1. Position the scrubber bar at the point along the timeline where the event should occur.
  2. Click the Edit Animation Events button to edit markers at the selected position.
  1. In the popup window, click Add Event and enter an event name.
  2. In the Parameter field, you can enter a parameter string for the event, outlined in more detail below.
  3. When ready, click Save to register the event. In the events bar of the editor, you’ll see a new marker symbol at the selected position.

Detecting Events

To detect animation events in a , connect a function to the function of , for instance:

local Players = game:GetService("Players") local player = Players.LocalPlayer local character = player.Character if not character or not character.Parent then character = player.CharacterAdded:Wait() end local humanoid = character:WaitForChild("Humanoid") local animator = humanoid:WaitForChild("Animator") -- Create new "Animation" instance local walkAnim = Instance.new("Animation") -- Set its "AnimationId" to the corresponding animation asset ID walkAnim.AnimationId = "rbxassetid://5432167890" -- Load animation onto the animator local walkAnimTrack = animator:LoadAnimation(walkAnim) -- Connect "GetMarkerReachedSignal" event to a specific named keyframe walkAnimTrack:GetMarkerReachedSignal("FootStep"):Connect(function(paramString)print(paramString)end)

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As noted earlier, you can specify a Parameter value for any event marker within the animation editor. This lets you pass a custom string (single value, comma-separated string, etc.) to the function as illustrated by the argument in the code example above. This string can then be parsed or converted, if necessary, and used for whatever action you wish to perform in the event.


Cloning Events

As you create events, they become available for usage throughout the animation, not only at the time position where you created them. For instance, you can create a “FootStep” event marker at the point where a character’s left foot touches down, then use the same event when the character’s right foot touches down.

To clone an event:

  1. Click an event marker in the event bar.
  1. Press +(+ on Mac).
  2. Move the scrubber bar to the point where the event should be cloned and press +(+ on Mac).

If the original event uses a parameter but the cloned event should use a modified parameter, right-click the cloned marker, select Edit Animation Event, type in the desired changes, and click Save.

Events can also be cloned by clicking the Edit Animation Events button (just as if you were creating a new event), clicking Add Event in the popup window, selecting the desired event from the dropdown, and clicking Save.

Saving and Exporting

Once you’re satisfied with an animation, you can either save it as a object or export it to Roblox for use in your games.

Saving to Project

To save an animation as a :

  1. Click the button in the upper-left section of the editor window.
  1. Select Save or Save As from the context menu to save the animation as a child of the AnimSaves object (itself a child of the rig).

Note that the saved is not used to load the animation in a game. See the next section for details on exporting an animation for in-game use.

Exporting to Roblox

To use an animation in an actual game, you must export it to Roblox and note the assigned asset ID.

  1. Click the button in the upper-left section of the editor window.
  1. Select Export from the context menu.
  2. Decide whether to create a new animation or overwrite an existing one.
  3. Once the upload is complete, you can copy the animation’s asset ID by clicking the “copy” button in the export window. This ID is required for scripting animations as outlined in .

If your animation will be used for a default Roblox character animation like jumping or running, as outlined , you must rename the final keyframe End(with a capital E). This can be done by right-clicking the final “select all keyframes” symbol in the upper bar and choosing Rename Key Keyframe.


Sours: https://developer.roblox.com/en-us/articles/using-animation-editor

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The second way of using animations is to play them in response to a character’s action in-game: for instance, if a player picks up an item, or takes damage.

In this next script, whenever a player presses a button, a shock animation will play and paralyze them until the animation finishes.

Setup

The remainder of this course uses a pre-made model that includes a ProxmityPrompt. Players can walk up to a button and press it to activate an event.

  1. Download the Shock Button model and insert it into Studio.

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    Models can be added into your Inventory to be used in any game.

    1. In a browser, open the model page, click the Get button. This adds the model into your inventory.

    2. In Studio, go to the View tab and click on the Toolbox.

    3. In the Toolbox window, click on the Inventory button. Then, make sure the dropdown is on My Models.

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    4. Select the Shock Button model to add it into the game.


  2. In StarterPlayer > StarterPlayerScripts, create a local script named PlayShockAnimation.

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  3. The code below calls a function named when the proximity prompt is activated. Copy it into your script.

    local Players = game:GetService("Players") local player = Players.LocalPlayer local character = player.Character if not character or not character.Parent then character = player.CharacterAdded:Wait() end local humanoid = character:WaitForChild("Humanoid") local Animator = humanoid:WaitForChild("Animator") local shockButton = workspace.ShockButton.Button local proximityPrompt = shockButton.ProximityPrompt local shockParticle = shockButton.ExplosionParticle local function onShockTrigger(player) shockParticle:Emit(100) end proximityPrompt.Triggered:Connect(onShockTrigger)

    This script uses specifically named parts. If you rename parts of the imported model, be sure to update their variables (lines 12-14) in the script.

Create and Load an Animation

Animations that the player uses are stored on the player’s Animator object. To play the shock animation, a new animation track will need to be loaded onto the Animator object when they join the game.

  1. Above , create a new Animation instance named . Then, set the of that to the desired animation. Use the ID in the code box if needed.

    local shockButton = game.Workspace.ShockButton.Button local proximityPrompt = shockButton.ProximityPrompt local shockParticle = shockButton.ExplosionParticle local shockAnimation = Instance.new("Animation")shockAnimation.AnimationId = "rbxassetid://3716468774" local function onShockTrigger(player) end
  2. Create a new variable named . On the player’s Animator, call , passing in the previously created animation.

    local shockAnimation = Instance.new("Animation") shockAnimation.AnimationId = "rbxassetid://3716468774" local shockAnimationTrack = Animator:LoadAnimation(shockAnimation)
  3. With the new animation loaded, change some of the track’s properties.

    • Set the AnimationPriority to - Ensures the animation overrides any current animations playing.
    • Set Looped to so the animation doesn’t repeat.
    local shockAnimation = Instance.new("Animation") shockAnimation.AnimationId = "rbxassetid://3716468774" local shockAnimationTrack = Animator:LoadAnimation(shockAnimation) shockAnimationTrack.Priority = Enum.AnimationPriority.ActionshockAnimationTrack.Looped = false

Play the Animation

Whenever someone triggers the ProximityPrompt on the button, it’ll play an animation and temporarily freeze that player.

  1. Find the function. On the , call the function.

    local function onShockTrigger(player) shockParticle:Emit(100) shockAnimationTrack:Play() end
  2. To prevent the player from moving while the animation plays, change the humanoid’s property to 0.

    local function onShockTrigger(player) shockParticle:Emit(100) shockAnimationTrack:Play() humanoid.WalkSpeed = 0 end

Using Animations with Events

Just how parts have Touched events, animations have events such as . For the script, once the animation finishes, you’ll restore the player’s move speed.

  1. Access the event for the animation track using the dot operator, then call the function. This pauses the code until that animation finishes.

    local function onShockTrigger(player) shockParticle:Emit(100) shockAnimationTrack:Play() humanoid.WalkSpeed = 0 shockAnimationTrack.Stopped:Wait() end
  2. Return the player’s walk speed to 16, the default for Roblox players.

    local function onShockTrigger(player) shockParticle:Emit(100) shockAnimationTrack:Play() humanoid.WalkSpeed = 0 shockAnimationTrack.Stopped:Wait() humanoid.WalkSpeed = 16 end
  3. Test the game by walking up the part and press to get a shock.

The framework in this script can be easily adapted to different gameplay situations. For instance, try playing a special animation whenever a player touches a trap part, or whenever a team wins a game round.

Sours: https://developer.roblox.com/en-us/onboarding/scripting-avatar-animations/2


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