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  • Item 6104807

    PR15: FlexRadio Systems FLEX-6600M HF and 6-Meter SDR Transceiver and SmartSDR Software Version 3

    $ 4,555.008  8 bids

    Ended Thu 10:08PM

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  • Item 6076077

    PR3: Yaesu FTdx101MP MF, HF, and 6-Meter Transceiver

    $ 4,230.008  8 bids

    Ended Thu 10:03PM

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  • Item 6076078

    PR4: Apache Labs ANAN-7000DLE MKII HF and 6-Meter SDR Transceiver with i7 CPU

    $ 3,600.006  6 bids

    Ended Thu 10:06PM

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  • Item 6078174

    D2: R-390A/URR Radio Receiver

    $ 1,400.0018  18 bids

    Ended Thu 10:11PM

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  • Item 6104803

    PR19: Lab500 Discovery TX-500 160-6 Meter Portable Transceiver

    $ 1,300.0015  15 bids

    Ended Thu 10:08PM

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  • Item 6076085

    PR12: Icom IC-705 HF/VHF/UHF Multimode Transceiver

    $ 1,300.007  7 bids

    Ended Thu 10:04PM

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  • Item 6074450

    M20: The ARRL Lab Mystery Junque Box

    $ 1,010.0053  53 bids

    Ended Thu 10:19PM

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  • Item 6074427

    M19: The ARRL Lab Mystery Junque Box

    $ 1,010.0045  45 bids

    Ended Thu 10:20PM

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  • Item 6077962

    M9: Collins KWM-2 and Type 516F-2 Power Supply

    $ 925.0013  13 bids

    Ended Thu 10:04PM

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  • Item 6092768

    M27: Icom IC-746 Pro and SP-21

    $ 725.005  5 bids

    Ended Thu 10:07PM

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  • Item 6077980

    D1: Johnson Viking Valiant II Transmitter

    $ 700.001  1 bid

    Ended Thu 10:05PM

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  • Item 6074455

    M22: The ARRL Lab Mystery Junque Box

    $ 700.0029  29 bids

    Ended Thu 10:02PM

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  • Item 6074456

    M23: The ARRL Lab Mystery Junque Box

    $ 670.0022  22 bids

    Ended Thu 10:02PM

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  • Item 6074457

    M24: The ARRL Lab Mystery Junque Box

    $ 660.0021  21 bids

    Ended Thu 10:03PM

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  • Item 6074452

    M21: The ARRL Lab Mystery Junque Box

    $ 660.0024  24 bids

    Ended Thu 10:02PM

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  • Item 6090230

    D31: Nikon D300 Camera, Lens and filled carrying bag

    $ 575.0012  12 bids

    Ended Thu 10:17PM

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  • Item 6076083

    PR9: RFinder B1 Dual-Band DMR/FM Transceiver with Android Smartphone

    $ 550.001  1 bid

    Ended Thu 10:05PM

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  • Item 6076080

    PR6: Yaesu FTM-300DR Dual-Band FM/Digital Mobile Transceiver

    $ 525.0010  10 bids

    Ended Thu 10:08PM

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  • Item 6076076

    PR2: Xiegu G90 HF Transceiver

    $ 460.008  8 bids

    Ended Thu 10:03PM

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  • Item 6094155

    PR17: iPortable Pro 2 Equipment Radio Systems 6UM

    $ 435.009  9 bids

    Ended Thu 10:07PM

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  • Item 6076081

    PR7: Etón Elite 750 Portable Receiver

    $ 430.006  6 bids

    Ended Thu 10:03PM

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  • Item 6071091

    M12: RFinder

    $ 410.008  8 bids

    Ended Thu 10:01PM

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  • Item 6094154

    PR16: BridgeCom Systems SkyBridge Plus Dual-Band Digital Hotspot

    $ 385.007  7 bids

    Ended Thu 10:07PM

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  • Item 6077961

    M8: Kenwood TS-520S Transceiver

    $ 360.003  3 bids

    Ended Thu 10:04PM

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  • Item 6071117

    M3: ARRL Hands-On Radio Electronics Kit 2019

    $ 340.0023  23 bids

    Ended Thu 10:04PM

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  • Item 6076087

    PR13: Icom AH-705 Antenna Tuner

    $ 333.006  6 bids

    Ended Thu 10:04PM

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  • Item 6094096

    D33: Elecraft W2 Digital HF and VHF Wattmeter

    $ 330.008  8 bids

    Ended Thu 10:07PM

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  • Item 6071112

    M1: ARRL Hands-On Radio Electronics Kit 2019

    $ 320.0023  23 bids

    Ended Thu 10:05PM

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  • Item 6104757

    D37: TPI-1005-A Signal Generator

    $ 318.004  4 bids

    Ended Thu 10:13PM

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  • Item 6077957

    D16: Remote Operating Station from BeLoud.US 48 Hours

    $ 300.000

    Ended Thu 10:04PM

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  • Item 6071116

    M2: ARRL Hands-On Radio Electronics Kit 2019

    $ 290.0022  22 bids

    Ended Thu 10:06PM

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  • Item 6104756

    D36: Hallicrafters Model SX-110

    $ 290.0015  15 bids

    Ended Thu 10:12PM

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  • Item 6092762

    M26: ARRL Backpack surprise

    $ 260.0025  25 bids

    Ended Thu 10:07PM

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  • Item 6076088

    PR14: mAT-705 Antenna Tuner

    $ 260.007  7 bids

    Ended Thu 10:04PM

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  • Item 6077964

    M10: Hammarlund Model No. HQ-110

    $ 250.001  1 bid

    Ended Thu 10:05PM

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  • Item 6078213

    D19: Jetstream JTPS50A

    $ 231.0012  12 bids

    Ended Thu 10:05PM

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  • Item 6078175

    D3: AF6L Spirit Morse Key Dual Paddle

    $ 230.003  3 bids

    Ended Thu 10:05PM

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  • Item 6076072

    PR1: Ameritron ADL-2500 Dry Dummy Load

    $ 230.003  3 bids

    Ended Thu 10:03PM

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  • Item 6104755

    D35: Anytone AT-D868UV/D878UV

    $ 230.0010  10 bids

    Ended Thu 10:07PM

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  • Item 6073083

    M18: ARRL Sling Bag Suprise

    $ 210.0022  22 bids

    Ended Thu 10:02PM

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  • Item 6078176

    D4: FA-VA4 Vector Antenna Analyzer

    $ 210.0014  14 bids

    Ended Thu 10:05PM

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  • Item 6071106

    M15: Field Day 2020 Cooler filled

    $ 200.0024  24 bids

    Ended Thu 10:01PM

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  • Item 6077966

    M13: TE Systems Model 4410

    $ 185.006  6 bids

    Ended Thu 10:05PM

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  • Item 6078207

    D17: bhi DSP Noise Cancelling In-Line Module

    $ 175.000

    Ended Thu 10:05PM

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  • Item 6085007

    D26: Icom SM-20 Desktop Microphone

    $ 165.0014  14 bids

    Ended Thu 10:06PM

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  • Item 6076079

    PR5: Palstar DL1500 Dry Dummy Load

    $ 160.002  2 bids

    Ended Thu 10:03PM

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  • Item 6076084

    PR11: Alinco DJ-VX50T VHF/UHF Handheld Transceiver

    $ 156.0012  12 bids

    Ended Thu 10:04PM

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  • Item 6088607

    D30: The Astatic Corp D-104 Microphone with T-UG8 Stand

    $ 155.008  8 bids

    Ended Thu 10:06PM

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  • Item 6071086

    M11: tinySA - tiny Spectrum Analyzer

    $ 145.0017  17 bids

    Ended Thu 10:00PM

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  • Item 6104799

    D5: 1932 ARRL Handbook

    $ 145.0012  12 bids

    Ended Thu 10:10PM

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  • Item 6076086

    PR10: HYS TC-YG08UV Dual-Band VHF/UHF Yagi Antenna

    $ 140.0011  11 bids

    Ended Thu 10:07PM

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  • Item 6076082

    PR8: MFJ-264 Dry Dummy Load

    $ 135.0012  12 bids

    Ended Thu 10:04PM

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  • Item 6078203

    D18: MASTRANT-P Guyrope 8 mm 330 ft spool

    $ 132.005  5 bids

    Ended Thu 10:05PM

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  • Item 6075547

    D15: Dr.Duino Explorer Edition

    $ 115.007  7 bids

    Ended Thu 10:03PM

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  • Item 6104792

    M25: Peavey 8-Channel line mixer - from W1AW

    $ 105.005  5 bids

    Ended Thu 10:08PM

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  • Item 6094158

    PR18: SOTABEAMS DSP Filter Unit

    $ 90.006  6 bids

    Ended Thu 10:07PM

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  • Item 6092767

    D34: TYT TH-UVF1 FM Transceiver

    $ 83.004  4 bids

    Ended Thu 10:07PM

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  • Item 6071118

    M4: ARRL Basic Electronics Kit/Understanding Basic Electronics

    $ 78.0010  10 bids

    Ended Thu 10:01PM

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  • Item 6072724

    B3: Archie's Ham Radio Aventure Comic Book

    $ 78.0016  16 bids

    Ended Thu 10:01PM

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  • Item 6104797

    M30: AMR MC-4 4-Channel Cassette - from W1AW

    $ 75.000

    Ended Thu 10:08PM

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  • Item 6104786

    M17: Peavey EQ-215 Equalizer - from W1AW

    $ 65.001  1 bid

    Ended Thu 10:08PM

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  • Item 6084910

    D22: The Radio Amateur's Handbook 1972

    $ 64.008  8 bids

    Ended Thu 10:11PM

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  • Item 6105137

    B5: The Beginner's Story of Radio by B. Francis Dashiell

    $ 63.005  5 bids

    Ended Thu 10:09PM

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  • Item 6063028

    D6: Radio Magazine 6-Issues

    $ 60.002  2 bids

    Ended Thu 10:00PM

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  • Item 6062971

    D13: The Radio (Magazine) Handbook for Amateurs and Experimenters

    $ 60.008  8 bids

    Ended Thu 10:00PM

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  • Item 6087891

    D29: Garmin GPS 18 USB

    $ 57.007  7 bids

    Ended Thu 10:06PM

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  • Item 6104795

    M28: Peavey CDS-2 Limiter - from W1AW

    $ 55.000

    Ended Thu 10:08PM

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  • Item 6092755

    D32: Hallicrafters Service Bulletin for model SX-42

    $ 54.008  8 bids

    Ended Thu 10:07PM

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  • Item 6084908

    D21: The Radio Amateur's Handbook 1946

    $ 53.007  7 bids

    Ended Thu 10:06PM

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  • Item 6062968

    D14: The Radio Amateur's Handbook 1945

    $ 53.006  6 bids

    Ended Thu 10:00PM

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  • Item 6104784

    M16: Peavey EQ-215 Equalizer - from W1AW

    $ 53.002  2 bids

    Ended Thu 10:08PM

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  • Item 6062848

    D11: The Radio Amateur's Handbook 1961

    $ 51.003  3 bids

    Ended Thu 10:00PM

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  • Item 6084912

    D23: The Radio Amateur's Handbook 1964

    $ 51.008  8 bids

    Ended Thu 10:06PM

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  • Item 6084983

    D25: The Radio Amateur's Handbook 1963

    $ 50.008  8 bids

    Ended Thu 10:06PM

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  • Item 6062978

    D8: All About Cubical Quad Antennas

    $ 42.006  6 bids

    Ended Thu 10:00PM

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  • Item 6062984

    D10: Amateur Radio Stations of the United States

    $ 42.005  5 bids

    Ended Thu 10:00PM

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  • Item 6075446

    M29: ARRL Morse Code Oscillator

    $ 40.007  7 bids

    Ended Thu 10:03PM

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  • Item 6084913

    D24: The Radio Amateur's Handbook 1967

    $ 35.003  3 bids

    Ended Thu 10:06PM

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  • Item 6072722

    B4: Archie's Ham Radio Aventure Comic Book

    $ 32.006  6 bids

    Ended Thu 10:01PM

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  • Item 6072912

    B2: Night Signals by Cynthia Wall, KA7ITT

    $ 32.005  5 bids

    Ended Thu 10:02PM

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  • Item 6072919

    B1: 50 Years of Amateur Radio Innovation

    $ 32.004  4 bids

    Ended Thu 10:02PM

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  • Item 6063007

    D9: Hints and Kinks for the Radio Amateur

    $ 32.004  4 bids

    Ended Thu 10:00PM

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  • Item 6105162

    B7: The Manual of Short Wave Radio

    $ 32.003  3 bids

    Ended Thu 10:09PM

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  • Item 6063003

    D7: Radio Broadcast - Radio for Every Place and Purpose

    $ 30.001  1 bid

    Ended Thu 10:00PM

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  • Item 6071102

    M14: ARRL T-Shirt size Large

    $ 27.007  7 bids

    Ended Thu 10:01PM

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  • Item 6105138

    B6: Radio From Start to Finish

    $ 27.002  2 bids

    Ended Thu 10:09PM

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  • Item 6084906

    D20: The Radio Amateur's Handbook 1976

    $ 25.001  1 bid

    Ended Thu 10:05PM

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  • Item 6062822

    D12: The Radio Amateur's Handbook 1977

    $ 23.002  2 bids

    Ended Thu 10:00PM

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  • Item 6105135

    D39: 1991 Callbook North American Listings

    $ 18.005  5 bids

    Ended Thu 10:09PM

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  • Item 6105136

    D38: 1991 Callbook International Listings

    $ 13.004  4 bids

    Ended Thu 10:09PM

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  • Item 6072876

    M6: On the Air Magazine Jan/Feb 2020 Issue

    $ 8.001  1 bid

    Ended Thu 10:01PM

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  • Item 6072882

    M7: On the Air Magazine Jan/Feb 2020 Issue

    $ 8.001  1 bid

    Ended Thu 10:02PM

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  • Item 6072884

    M5: On the Air Magazine Jan/Feb 2020 Issue

    $ 8.002  2 bids

    Ended Thu 10:02PM

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  • Item 6085018

    D27: Gigaware 6ft Serial Cable

    $ 8.001  1 bid

    Ended Thu 10:06PM

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  • Item 6085019

    D28: Gigaware 6ft Serial Cable

    $ 8.001  1 bid

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    American Radio Relay League

    American organization of amateur radio enthusiasts

    The American Radio Relay League (ARRL) is the largest membership association of amateur radio enthusiasts in the USA. ARRL is a non-profit organization, and was co-founded on April 6, 1914, by Hiram Percy Maxim and Clarence D. Tuska of Hartford, Connecticut. The ARRL represents the interests of amateur radio operators before federal regulatory bodies, provides technical advice and assistance to amateur radio enthusiasts, supports a number of educational programs and sponsors emergency communications service throughout the country. The ARRL has approximately 161,000 members. In addition to members in the US, the organization claims over 7,000 members in other countries. The ARRL publishes many books and a monthly membership journal called QST. The ARRL held its Centennial Convention in Hartford, Connecticut in July 2014.

    The ARRL is the primary representative organization of amateur radio operators to the US government. It performs this function by lobbying the US Congress and the Federal Communications Commission. The ARRL is also the international secretariat of the International Amateur Radio Union, which performs a similar role internationally, advocating for amateur radio interests before the International Telecommunication Union and the World Administrative Radio Conferences.

    The organization is governed by a member-elected, volunteer Board of Directors. Each director serves a three-year term and represents the members within their particular region of the country. The national headquarters facilities are located in Newington, Connecticut. Along with the administrative headquarters, the 7-acre (2.8 ha) site is home to amateur radio stationW1AW. The ARRL Field Organization carries out local and regional activities across the United States.

    Governance[edit]

    ARRL W1AWbuilding in Newington, Connecticut, USA.

    The ARRL is governed by a member-elected, volunteer Board of Directors. The organization divides its membership into 15 Divisions, each representing a separate portion of the country. One Director and one Vice-Director are elected by the members of each Division to serve a three-year term. Director elections are staggered so that one-third of the Directors and Vice Directors are up for election each year. The Board of Directors manages policy direction for the organization as a whole.[3] The Board of Directors appoints an Executive Committee, led by the President and consisting of members of the ARRL Board of Directors, to make policy decisions between full Board meetings. ARRL's officers manage day-to-day administrative operation of the organization, led by the Chief Executive Officer. These paid officers hold their positions as long as the Board of Directors approve but have no vote on the Board.[2]

    Local and regional operational activities of the American Radio Relay League are carried out through its Field Organization. The organization divides the 15 Divisions into 71 separate geographic regions called Sections. Each Section has a similar team of one elected, volunteer Section Manager and several volunteer positions. Section Managers are elected by the members living within the section for a two-year term. The Section Manager appoints a team of volunteers. A Section Manager may optionally appoint one or more Assistant Section Managers.[7]

    An important function of the ARRL Field Organization is organizing emergency communications in the event of civil or natural disaster. The ARRL's Amateur Radio Emergency Services (ARES) program is organized through the ARRL Field Organization. Each Section of the Field Organization has an appointed Section Emergency Coordinator. The ARES organization supports training, establishes Memorandums of Understanding (MOU) with governmental and relief agencies, and organizes regular practice exercises.

    ARES has provided essential supplemental emergency communications innumerable times throughout the league's history. In 1989, hundreds of amateurs responded to the Loma Preita earthquake in the San Francisco Bay area putting in over 3000 volunteer hours in the first week. In 2005, ARES, with hundreds of volunteer amateur radio operators, provided key communications assistance to recovery organizations and officials coordinating Hurricane Katrina disaster relief.[8]

    Over 2,000 Amateur Radio clubs are members of the ARRL Affiliated Club Program.[4]

    History[edit]

    Hiram Percy Maxim, co-founder of the ARRL, ca. 1914.

    1914–1920[edit]

    In 1914, Hiram Percy Maxim of Hartford, Connecticut, was a prominent businessman, engineer, and inventor (notably of the Maxim Silencer). He was also an active radio amateur, with one of the best-equipped stations in the Hartford area. One night in April he attempted to send a message to another ham in Springfield, Massachusetts. He had a one-kilowatt station (call 1WH), and Springfield was only 30 miles (48 km) away, well within his normal range. He was unable to make contact, and remembering that he knew another ham in Windsor Locks, about halfway, he asked him to relay the message. At that time, the maximum reliable range of a station was a few hundred miles, and so Maxim realized that a formally organized relay system would be of tremendous use to amateurs.[9]

    Maxim was a member of the Radio Club of Hartford, and he presented a plan for the organization of an "American Radio Relay League" at its April 1914 meeting. The club agreed to sponsor the development of such an organization. Maxim and Clarence D. Tuska, the secretary of the Hartford Radio Club, developed application forms and sent them out to every amateur station they could think of. By September 1914 they had over 230 stations on the roster.

    In early 1915, disagreements began to surface as to the role of the Hartford Radio Club in the new organization, and in February the ARRL split off from the club and incorporated under Connecticut law. Finances were shaky, and most of the income came from sales of booklets, maps and message blanks. By March 1915, there were 600 stations on the roster, and due to improvements in equipment and operating ability, some of the better stations were claiming communication ranges of up to a thousand miles. It was apparent that the ARRL now needed some kind of bulletin to stay in touch with its members. Maxim and Tuska agreed to personally finance it, and in December 1915 the first, sixteen page issue of QST was sent free to all members. Further issues would be supplied through subscription at $1.00 per year.

    In 1916, with ARRL membership nearing a thousand, Maxim set up six trunk lines of relay stations, both east–west and north–south, and individual managers were appointed. Messages were now being relayed over longer and longer distances, and in February 1917 a message was sent from New York to Los Angeles and an answer received in one hour and twenty minutes.

    In 1917, the ARRL was reorganized to a more formal organization. A constitution was adopted, twelve directors and four officers were elected (including President Maxim and Secretary Tuska), and membership was opened to anyone interested in radio. No sooner had this happened than all amateurs received a letter from the Department of Commerce ordering them off the air and to dismantle all antennas, because the USA had entered World War I.

    During the war the ARRL facilitated the recruitment of amateurs into communications positions with the armed services, but had little else to do since all civilian experimentation with radio equipment was prohibited. In November 1918 the Armistice was signed, but Congress introduced bills to put all radio operations in the United States under control of the Navy. The ARRL strongly opposed the bills, of course; Maxim testified before Congressional committees and the League organized an effective grass roots campaign with thousands of individuals contacting their congressmen in opposition. The bills were defeated, and in April 1919 amateurs were permitted to put up antennas again, but only for receiving.

    Meanwhile, the League needed reorganization. A financing plan consisting of selling bonds to members was adopted and about $7500 was raised. QST was purchased from its owner, Clarence Tuska. ARRL continued to lobby Congress for the resumption of transmitting privileges, and after a number of protests and appeals, amateur radio was fully restored in November 1919.

    1920–1964[edit]

    ARRL radiogram delivery postcard, c. 1925

    The 1920s saw tremendous technical growth in radio. Pushed both by wartime demands and by the growing commercialization of radio, equipment rapidly improved. The use of spark gap technology quickly disappeared as the more efficient continuous wave system of generating radio-frequency energy and transmitting Morse Code became standard. In 1923 a two-way contact between Connecticut and France bridged the Atlantic Ocean for the first time.

    With government uncertainty as to how to allocate both commercial and amateur frequencies, the ARRL kept discipline in amateur ranks so that spectrum was not unnecessarily occupied. They worked with Washington and the result was that amateurs received the orderly series of harmonic frequency bands that they largely hold today (originally 1.8, 3.5, 7, 14, 28, and 56 MHz; other bands have since been added and the 56 MHz allocation was changed to 50 MHz).

    Other activities during this time included transcontinental relays to quickly move messages across the United States, communications assistance in several emergencies, and encouragement for an amateur radio operator on an Arctic expedition of Donald B. MacMillan—perhaps the first beginnings of DXpeditions. The League also began to act in an advisory capacity for the American delegations at international radio conferences. In 1925 the International Amateur Radio Union was formed, and it remains headquartered at Newington.

    In the 1930s the Great Depression took its toll on development. Hiram Percy Maxim died in 1936. His callsign W1AW was licensed to the League and remains in use as the first-ever Memorial Station. In 1937 the DXCC Award, for working 100 countries, was established, and it still is the premier achievement in amateur radio. Operators, often under the ARRL Emergency Corps, helped at numerous disasters. The League's QST magazine acted as a forum for experimenters in voice, television, and very high frequency work.

    During World War II, US amateurs were again told to leave the air. The ARRL developed the government-approved War Emergency Radio Service, a Civil Defense system. Thousands of League members, and many thousands more who received technical training through its publications, served in the conflict. In late 1945 the bands began to reopen. The end of the war brought a tremendous expansion of amateur radio as large amounts of war surplus equipment was available, many recently trained operators became active, and experiments began in such newly developed modes as single sideband and microwaves.

    The 1950s saw the continued development of amateur radio and consequent growth of the ARRL. New civil defense systems and procedures were developed by the League, including regular communications between isolated service members and their families. Equipment rapidly improved, although there was some trouble with television interference. The ARRL and many of its members cooperated with scientists during the International Geophysical Year in 1957, measuring the effects of solar activity on propagation in the VHF band.

    A controversial idea was originated in 1961 when the League encouraged "incentive licensing", which sought reversion to the principle that higher levels of license privileges should require higher levels of demonstrated knowledge and CW skill but took away some amateur privileges until licensees requalified at higher levels; "incentives" are still in effect and only holders of the highest class of license (Amateur Extra) maintain all amateur privileges. By 1964 the positive influence of the ARRL was so evident that the United States issued a commemorative postage stamp on its 50th anniversary. As the League prepared for the future a new headquarters building was opened at Newington.[10]

    1965–present[edit]

    [edit]

    Sixteen radio amateurs have led the ARRL as president.[11]

    NameCall SignYears
    H.P. MaximW1AW1914-1936
    E.C. WoodruffW8CMP1936-1940
    G.W. BaileyW2KH1940-1952
    G.L. DoslandWØTSN1952-1962
    H. Hoover, Jr.W6ZH1962-1966
    R.W. DennistonWØDX1966-1972
    H.J. DannalsW2TUK/W2HD1972-1982
    V.C. ClarkW4KFC1982-1983
    C.L. SmithWØBWJ1983-1984
    L.E. PriceW4RA1984-1992
    George WilsonW4OYI1992-1995
    Rod StaffordW6ROD1995-2000
    Jim HaynieW5JBP2000-2006
    Joel HarrisonW5ZN2006-2010
    Kay CraigieN3KN2010-2016
    Rick RoderickK5UR2016-

    Regulatory advocacy[edit]

    [icon]

    This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (February 2008)

    The ARRL has opposed regulatory support for Broadband over Power Lines, arguing that the power lines will radiate interfering radio energy, impeding amateur radio activities. The League has filed several interference reports with the FCC. The ARRL sued the FCC, claiming that the FCC violated the Administrative Procedure Act in creating its rules pertaining to BPL. On April 25, 2008, a US Court of Appeals agreed with the ARRL that the FCC violated the APA, especially by redacting data from the public that could have shed doubt on the FCC's decision. "It is one thing for the Commission to give notice and make available for comment the studies on which it relied in formulating the rule while explaining its non-reliance on certain parts," D.C. Circuit Judge Judith Rogers wrote. "It is quite another thing to provide notice and an opportunity for comment on only those parts of the studies that the Commission likes best."[12]

    Services[edit]

    One of the many guest operators at W1AW's Studio One. (2004)

    The American Radio Relay League offers several services to members that support their on-air operations. For members with an interest in DXing, the organization operates both incoming and out-going QSL bureaus for the exchange of QSL cards with stations in other countries. Staff at the organization headquarters maintain and operates station W1AW, the Hiram Percy Maxim Memorial Station, as a living memorial to the "Father of Organized Amateur Radio". The W1AW station is used for regular Morse code training transmissions for those wishing to learn and also broadcasts a variety of bulletins of interest to radio amateurs. The ARRL/VEC (Volunteer Examiner Coordinator) sponsors amateur radio license examinations for the three classes of U.S. amateur license. License classes and examinations are held in various locations throughout the year. Although the FCC currently recognizes 14 different organizations as VECs, the VEC sponsored by the ARRL oversees about two-thirds of all U.S. amateur radio license examinations.

    Publications[edit]

    The ARRL provides dozens of publications and journals to both members and non-members. QST is the organization's monthly membership journal, named after a Morse code Q signal that means "calling all stations". The organization also publishes two bimonthly magazines of special interest: QEX for radio electronics experimenters, and the National Contest Journal for contesting enthusiasts. The ARRL publishes various technical books and online courses. Members of the organization also have access to a special Members Only section of the ARRL web site that includes technical documents, expanded product reviews of amateur radio equipment, expanded contesting information, and a searchable database of all league publications. A flagship annual publication, The Radio Amateur's Handbook, has been published since 1926.[13] the ARRL also publishes a series of manuals designed to assist interested persons in obtaining an amateur radio license or upgrading to a higher class of license.

    Contests[edit]

    The ARRL sponsors numerous amateur radio contests throughout the year with the biggest of these being November Sweepstakes and the International DX Contest. Other contests and sponsored operating events include Straight Key Night, VHF Sweepstakes, UHF Contest, and 10 GHz and Up Contest. The ARRL also participates as a Headquarters station for the IARU HF World Championship. Field Day is an annual event organized by the ARRL that includes both a competitive element as well as an emphasis on emergency communications readiness and the promotion of amateur radio.

    Controversy[edit]

    Criticisms of ARRL have included its support for less strict licensing requirements in the 2000s, which opponents consider a "dumbing down" of amateur radio or making it more like CB radio, moves allegedly made to gain additional membership.[14] Other critics have felt almost the opposite, however, arguing that the ARRL was slow to lobby for the removal or the easing of the Morse code proficiency requirements of the various license classes, a "conservatism" keeping otherwise qualified people out of amateur radio and thus threatening its future.[14]

    Other critics have cited ARRL's support for segmentation of the HF amateur bands in the U.S. by bandwidth, rather than by mode, which some have claimed gives preference to users of the Winlink system[15] and manufacturer-specific proprietary modes such as Pactor 3, DSTAR and Wide-coverage Internet Repeater Enhancement System (WIRES). Regulation by bandwidth favors these proprietary technologies at the expense of narrowband and open-standard digital modes (such as JT65, PSK31, RTTY, and CW).

    Many Amateur Radio operators who are seeking to develop and experiment with new technology see the ARRL as backing down too quickly on the regulation by bandwidth issue. Recent[update] FCC rulings on the new soundcard mode called ROS point to the need to drop regulations that hinder experimentation and impede the development of narrowband techniques on the bands where they are most needed[16]

    An ARRL decision on November 14, 2017 to censure a member of its board of directors[17] drew strong criticism from many Amateur Radio operators.[18][19] Numerous operators expressed concern that this decision profoundly undermines the principles of representational democracy and of openness and transparency. A December 2017 white paper critical of the ARRL's actions was published online by CQ.[20] This censure was rescinded by the ARRL Board of Directors in July, 2019 at the second board meeting.[21]

    Elser-Mathes Cup[edit]

    The Elser-Mathes Cup was created in 1928 by U.S. Amateurs Fred Johnson Elser (W6FB/W7OX) and Stanley M. Mathes (7OE/K1CY) to be awarded for the "First Amateur Two-Way Communication Earth & Mars". The cup is a Philippine Igorot wood carving, a bowl supported by two standing figures.[22]

    Organization[edit]

    In the American Radio Relay League (ARRL) and the Radio Amateurs of Canada (RAC), the Section Manager is an elected volunteer who implements and manages programs in the section. The Section Manager is elected by the members of the organization who reside in the section and holds office for a two-year term. There are no term limits.

    For each of the section's activities, the Section Manager appoints individuals to oversee the activities. These individuals are collectively referred to as the cabinet.

    ARRL / RAC Section Organization Chart

    Cabinet positions include:

    • Assistant Section Managers
    • Affiliated Club Coordinator
    • Bulletin Manager
    • Official Observer Coordinator
    • Public Information Coordinator
    • Section Emergency Coordinator
    • Section Traffic Manager
    • Section Youth Coordinator
    • State Government Liaison
    • Technical Coordinator

    The Section Manager also appoints volunteers to serve within these program areas. The volunteers in any given Section serve at the pleasure of the Section Manager. The Section Manager also assists members with questions, issues or problems dealing with the organization's products and services; maintains liaison with the frequency coordinating body in the jurisdiction; maintains a relationship with the local field office of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC)(US only), and maintains communications with members in the section via email bulletins, web pages, and personal visits to Amateur Radio club meetings, hamfests and conventions.

    There are currently 71 sections in the ARRL,[23] (United States) and 12 sections in the RAC[24] (Canada).

    An Affiliated Club Coordinator is the assistant to the Section Manager for radio club matters. One ACC is appointed in each section by the Section Manager to encourage club affiliation with the national organization on a section-wide basis.

    The Section Traffic Manager is appointed by the Section Manager to supervise and coordinate traffic handling efforts within the National Traffic System and the section.

    The Section Emergency Coordinator is the assistant to the Section Manager for amateur radio emergency communications preparedness. The SEC is appointed by the Section Manager.

    See also[edit]

    References[edit]

    1. ^ abAmerican Radio Relay League. "About the ARRL". Sept. 28, 2015.
    2. ^ abAmerican Radio Relay League (2010). "Officers of the ARRL". Feb. 23, 2010.
    3. ^ abAmerican Radio Relay League (2008). "ARRL Divisions". Jan. 29, 2008.
    4. ^ abAmerican Radio Relay League (2008). Annual Report. Dec. 31, 2008.
    5. ^American Radio Relay League (2010). About the ARRL. Feb. 23, 2010.
    6. ^American Radio Relay League (1999). "W1AW Bulletin". ARLB047 July 20, 1999.
    7. ^American Radio Relay League (2008). "The ARRL Field Organization". Feb. 1, 2008.
    8. ^Amateur Radio Emergency Service (2008). "Katrina: The Untold Story"Archived 2008-02-28 at the Wayback Machine. Retrieved February 14, 2008.
    9. ^DeSoto, Clinton B. (1936). Two Hundred Meters and Down. West Hartford, CT: American Radio Relay League, Inc.
    10. ^"Fifty Years of A.R.R.L.", American Radio Relay League, 1965
    11. ^ARRL web sites http://www.arrl.org/honorary-officials and http://www.arrl.org/officers
    12. ^FCC dealt setback in broadband-over-power-lines push | Tech news blog - CNET News.com
    13. ^Meier, Dave, N4NW ARRL Classic Publications, retrieved 7/26/2010
    14. ^ abMoseson, Rich (2004). "They Just Want to Make More Money..."Archived 2007-11-06 at the Wayback MachineZero Bias editorial column. CQ Amateur Radio. April, 2004.
    15. ^Moseson, Rich (2004). "Regulation by Bandwidth"Archived 2006-10-26 at the Wayback MachineZero Bias editorial column. CQ Amateur Radio. November, 2004.
    16. ^ARRL Website, March 4, 2010 FCC Reaffirms Statement on ROS>.
    17. ^ARRL Website, November 30, 2017."Minutes of Special Board Meeting ARRL Board of Directors, November 14, 2017"
    18. ^KB6NU's Ham Radio Blog. "What the heck is the ARRL board thinking?"
    19. ^KB6NU's Ham Radio Blog. "So, after all this talk, what do we do about the ARRL Board of Directors?"
    20. ^CQ website, December 2017. "CQ White Paper on ARRL Secrecy and Censure"
    21. ^"July 2019 Board meeting minutes"(PDF). ARRL July 2019 Meeting minutes. Retrieved 16 August 2019.
    22. ^Fred Johnson Elser W6FB/W7OX (Dec 1969). "That Planet Mars QSO Cup". QST. American Radio Relay League: 98.
    23. ^'ARRL Sections'
    24. ^"RAC Sections". Archived from the original on 2009-09-30. Retrieved 2012-12-29.

    External links[edit]

    Bibliography[edit]

    • De Soto, Clinton B., Two Hundred Meters and Down, the Story of Amateur Radio, Hartford: ARRL, 1936.
    • Fifty Years of ARRL, Newington, CT: ARRL, 1965.
    • Schumacher, Alice Clink, Hiram Percy Maxim, Father of Amateur Radio, Schumachers: Great Falls, MT, 1970.
    • Jahnke, Debra A. and Katherine A. Fay, eds., From Spark to Space, a Pictorial Journey through 75 Years of Amateur Radio, Newington, CT: ARRL, 1989.
    • Bartlett, Richard A., The World of Ham Radio, 1901–1950, Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2007.

    Further reading[edit]

    Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Radio_Relay_League
    Dave Casler Technician License Series: T35 Section 9.4 RF Exposure

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