Crazy cat meme

Crazy cat meme DEFAULT

Cats and the Internet

Images and videos of cats on the Internet

Images and videos of domestic cats make up some of the most viewed content on the web, particularly image macros in the form of lolcats. ThoughtCatalog has described cats as the "unofficial mascot of the Internet".[1]

The subject has attracted the attention of various scholars and critics, who have analysed why this form of low art has reached iconic status. Although it may be considered frivolous, cat-related Internet content contributes to how people interact with media and culture.[2] Some argue that there is a depth and complexity to this seemingly simple content, with a suggestion that the positive psychological effects that pets have on their owners also holds true for cat images viewed online.[3]

Research has suggested that viewing online cat media is related to positive emotions, and that it even may work as a form of digital therapy or stress relief for some users. Some elements of research also shows, that feelings of guilt when postponing tasks can be reduced by viewing cat content.[4]

Some individual cats, such as Grumpy Cat and Lil Bub, have achieved popularity online because of their unusual appearances and funny cat videos.

History[edit]

Humans have always had a close relationship with cats, and the animals have long been a subject of short films, including the early silent movies Boxing Cats (1894) and The Sick Kitten (1903).[5]Harry Pointer (1822–1889) has been cited as the "progenitor of the shameless cat picture".[6] Cats have been shared via email since the Internet's rise to prominence in the 1990s.[7] The first cat video on YouTube was uploaded in 2005 by YouTube co-founder Steve Chen, who posted a video of his cat called "Pajamas and Nick Drake".[7] The following year, "Puppy vs Cat" became the first viral cat video; uploaded by a user called Sanchey (a.k.a. Michael Wienzek);[8] as of 2015[update] it had over 16 million views on YouTube.[7] In a Mashable article that explored the history of cat media on the Internet, the oldest entry was an ASCII art cat that originated on 2channel, and was a pictorial representation of the phrase "Please go away."[9] The oldest continuously operating cat website is sophie.net, which launched in October of 1999 and is still operating.[10]

The New York Times described cat images as "that essential building block of the Internet".[11] In addition, 2,594,329 cat images had been manually annotated in flickr.com by users.[12] An interesting phenomenon is that many photograph owners tag their house cats as "tiger".[13]

Eric Nakagawa and Kari Unebasami started the website I Can Haz Cheezburger in 2007, where they shared funny pictures of cats. This site allowed users to create LOLcatmemes by placing writing on top of pictures of their cats. This site now has more than 100 million views per month and has "created a whole new form of internet speak".[7] In 2009, the humour site Urlesque deemed September 9 "A Day Without Cats Online", and had over 40 blogs and websites agree to "[ban] cats from their pages for at least 24 hours".[14] As of 2015[update], there are over 2 million cat videos on YouTube alone, and cats are one of the most searched keywords on the Internet.[7] CNN estimated that in 2015 there could be around 6.5 billion cat pictures on the Internet.[15] The Internet has been described as a "virtual cat park, a social space for cat lovers in the same way that dog lovers congregate at a dog park".[16]The Daily Telegraph deemed Nyan Cat the most popular Internet cat,[17] while NPR gave this title to Grumpy Cat.[18]The Daily Telegraph also deemed the best cat video on YouTube as "Surprised Kitty (Original)", which currently has over 75 million views.[19] Buzzfeed deemed Cattycake the most important cat of 2010.[20]

In 2015, an exhibition called "How Cats Took Over The Internet" opened at the Museum of the Moving Image in New York.[21] The exhibition "looks at the history of how they rose to internet fame, and why people like them so much".[7] There is even a book entitled How to Make Your Cat an Internet Celebrity: A Guide to Financial Freedom.[22] The annual Internet Cat Video Festival celebrated and awards the Golden Kitty to cat videos.[23] According to Star Tribune, the festival's success is because "people realized that the cat video they'd chuckled over in the privacy of their homes was suddenly a thousand times funnier when there are thousands of other people around".[24]The Daily Telegraph had an entire article devoted to International Cat Day.[25] EMGN wrote an article entitled "21 Reasons Why Cats And The Internet Are A Match Made in Heaven".[26]

In 2015, there were more than 2 million cat videos on YouTube, with an average of 12,000 views each – a higher average than any other category of YouTube content.[27] Cats made up 16% of views in YouTube's "Pets & Animals" category, compared to dogs' 23%.[28] The YouTube video Cats vs. Zombies merged the two Internet phenomena of cats and zombies.[29] Data from BuzzFeed and Tumblr has shown that dog videos have more views than those of cats, and less than 1% of posts on Reddit mention cats.[30] While dogs are searched for much more than cats, there is less content on the Internet.[31] The Facebook page "Cats" has over 2 million likes while Dogs has over 6.5 million.[32] In an Internet tradition, The New York Times Archives Twitter account posts cat reporting throughout the history of the NYT.[33][34] The Japanese prefecture of Hiroshima launched an online Cat Street View, which showed the region from the perspective of a cat.[35][36]

Abigail Tucker, author of The Lion in the Living Room, a history of domestic cats, has suggested that cats appeal particularly because they "remind us of our own faces, and especially of our babies ... [they're] strikingly human but also perpetually deadpan".[37][38]

Psychology[edit]

Jason Eppink, curator of the Museum of the Moving Image's show How Cats Took Over the Internet, has noted the "outsized role" of cats on the Internet.[39]Wired magazine felt that the cuteness of cats was "too simplistic" an explanation of their popularity online.[30]

A scientific survey done found that the participants were more happy after watching cat videos.[7][40] The researcher behind the survey explained "If we want to better understand the effects the Internet may have on us as individuals and on society, then researchers can't ignore Internet cats anymore"[41] and "consumption of online cat-related media deserves empirical attention".[42] The Huffington Post suggested that the videos were a form of procrastination, with most being watched while at work or ostensibly studying,[43] while IU Bloomington commented "[it] does more than simply entertain; it boosts viewers' energy and positive emotions and decreases negative feelings".[44]Business Insider argues "This falls in line with a body of research regarding the effects that animals have on people."[45] A 2015 study by Jessica Gall Myrick found that people were more than twice as likely to post a picture or video of a cat to the Internet than they were to post a selfie.[27]

Maria Bustillos considers cat videos to be "the crystallisation of all that human beings love about cats", with their "natural beauty and majesty" being "just one tiny slip away from total humiliation", which Bustillos sees as a mirror of the human condition.[46] When the creator of the World Wide Web, Tim Berners-Lee, was asked for an example of a popular use of the Internet that he would never have predicted, he answered, "Kittens".[47] A 2014 paper argues that cats' "unselfconsciousness" is rare in an age of hyper-surveillance, and cat photos appeal to people as it lets them imagine "the possibility of freedom from surveillance", while presenting the power of controlling that surveillance as unproblematic.[48]Time magazine felt that cat images tap into viewers nature as "secret voyeurs".[28]

The Cheezburger Network considers cats to be the "perfect canvas" for human emotion, as they have expressive facial and body aspects.[49]Mashable offered "cats' cuteness, non-cuteness, popularity among geeks, blank canvas qualities, personality issues, and the fact that dogs just don't have 'it'" as possible explanations to cats' popularity on the Internet.[50] A paper entitled ""I Can Haz Emoshuns?" – Understanding Anthropomorphosis of Cats among Internet Users" found that Tagpuss, an app that showed users cat images and asked them to choose their emotion "can be used to identify cat behaviours that lay-people find difficult to distinguish".[relevant?][51]

Jason Eppink, curator of the "How Cats Took Over the Internet" exhibition, explained: "People on the web are more likely to post a cat than another animal, because it sort of perpetuates itself. It becomes a self-fulfilling prophesy. [sic]"[34][52]Jason Kottke considers cats to be "easier to objectify" and therefore "easier to make fun of".[53] Journalist Jack Shepherd suggested that cats were more popular than dogs because dogs were "trying too hard", and humorous behavior in a dog would be seen as a bid for validation. Shepherd sees cats' behavior as being "cool, and effortless, and devoid of any concern about what you might think about it. It is art for art's sake".[54]

Cats have historically been associated with magic, and have been revered by various human cultures, the ancient Egyptians worshipping them as gods and the creatures being feared as demons in ancient Japan,[15] such as the bakeneko. Vogue magazine has suggested that the popularity of cats on the Internet is culturally-specific, being popular in North America, Western Europe, and Japan. Other nations favor different animals online, Ugandans sharing images of goats and chickens, Mexicans preferring llamas, and Chinese Internet users sharing images of the river crab and grass-mud horse due to double-meanings of their names allowing them to "subvert government Internet censors".[55]

Cute cat theory of digital activism[edit]

Main article: Cute cat theory of digital activism

A picture of a striped cat in an apparent seated position with its legs spread, looking at the camera. In the upper left corner is the text "Why U Wanna Censor Me?" in white capital letters
Lolcatimages are often shared through the same networks used by online activists

The cute cat theory of digital activism is a theory concerning Internet activism, Internet censorship, and "cute cats" (a term used for any low-value, but popular online activity) developed by Ethan Zuckerman in 2008.[56][57] It posits that most people are not interested in activism; instead, they want to use the web for mundane activities, including surfing for pornography and lolcats ("cute cats").[58] The tools that they develop for that (such as Facebook, Flickr, Blogger, Twitter, and similar platforms) are very useful to social movement activists, who may lack resources to develop dedicated tools themselves.[58] This, in turn, makes the activists more immune to reprisals by governments than if they were using a dedicated activism platform, because shutting down a popular public platform provokes a larger public outcry than shutting down an obscure one.[58]

Celebrities[edit]

Because of the relative newness of this industry, most owners of famous cats found themselves stumbling into Internet stardom without intentionally planning it.[59]

Grumpy Cat[edit]

Main article: Grumpy Cat

Tardar Sauce (born April 4, 2012 - May 15, 2019),[60] better known by her Internet name "Grumpy Cat", was a cat and Internet celebrity known for her grumpy facial expression.[61][62][63] Her owner, Tabatha Bundesen, says that her permanently grumpy-looking face was due to an underbite and feline dwarfism.[61][64][65] Grumpy Cat's popularity originated from a picture posted to the social news website Reddit by Bundesen's brother Bryan on September 22, 2012.[61][66][67] It was made into an image macro with grumpy captions. As of December 10, 2014[update], "The Official Grumpy Cat" page on Facebook has over 7 million "likes".[68] Grumpy Cat was featured on the front page of The Wall Street Journal on May 30, 2013, and on the cover of New York magazine on October 7, 2013.[63][69][70] In August 2015 it was announced that Grumpy Cat would get her own animatronic waxwork at Madame Tussauds in San Francisco.[71]The Huffington Post wrote an article exploring America's fascination with cats.[72]

Lil Bub[edit]

Main article: Lil Bub

Lil Bub (Lillian Bubbles) (June 21, 2011 - December 1, 2019)[73] was an American celebrity cat known for her unique appearance. She was the runt of her litter. Her owner, Mike Bridavsky, adopted her when his friends called to ask him to give her a home. Her photos were first posted to Tumblr in November 2011 then taken off after being featured on the social news website reddit.[74] "Lil Bub" on Facebook has over two million Likes.[75] Lil Bub stars in Lil Bub & Friendz, a documentary premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival on April 18, 2013 that won the Tribeca Online Festival Best Feature Film.[76][77][78]

Maru[edit]

Main article: Maru (cat)

Maru (まる, Japanese: circle or round; born May 24, 2007[79]) is a male Scottish Fold (straight variety[80]) cat in Japan who has become popular on YouTube. As of April 2013[update], videos with Maru have been viewed over 200 million times.[81] Videos featuring Maru have an average of 800,000 views each and he is mentioned often in print and televised media discussing Internet celebrities.[82] Maru is the "most famous cat on the internet."[83]

Maru's owner posts videos under the account name 'mugumogu'. His owner is almost never seen in the videos, although the video titled "Maru's ear cleaning". is an exception. The videos include title cards in English and Japanese setting up and describing the events, and often show Maru playing in cardboard boxes, indicated by "I love a box!" in his first video.

Colonel Meow[edit]

Main article: Colonel Meow

Colonel Meow (adopted October 11, 2011[Note 1] – January 29, 2014)[84] was a male Himalayan–Persiancrossbreed cat, who holds the 2014 Guinness world record for the longest fur on a cat (nine inches or about 23 cm).[85] He became an Internet celebrity when his owners posted pictures of his scowling face to Facebook and Instagram.[86][87] He was known by his hundreds of thousands of followers as an "adorable fearsome dictator", a "prodigious Scotch drinker" and "the angriest cat in the world".[87]

Oskar and Klaus[edit]

Oskar was born on May 5, 2011, and was an outdoor cat living on a small farm in the Loess Hills of western Iowa before being adopted by Mick and Bethany Szydlowski on July 11 of that year. They later moved to Nebraska, finally settling in Seattle, Washington. Oskar had a condition called microphthalmia, which means his eyes never fully developed because of genetic abnormalities. Even though he could not see, Oskar could function perfectly well using his other senses, and was happy and healthy. Many who met him for the first time never even realized he was completely blind.

Oskar's best friend, "The Klaus", is a former stray that was adopted in 2006 by the same couple. He lives in Seattle with Mick, and Bethany, and formerly with Oskar. In 2014, they published a book about the cats' adventures titled Oskar and Klaus Present: The Search for Bigfoot.[88]

On February 5, 2018, Oskar died, likely due to heart failure.[89]

Oh Long Johnson[edit]

This unnamed cat, first seen in a video shown on America's Funniest Home Videos, became famous for its growling resembling human speech. In the video, one cat makes aggressive noises at another, its vocalizations resembling "human-like gibberish".[90] The video first appeared on the Internet in 2006[90] during a compilation video on YouTube featuring cats producing human-like sounds, and other standalone videos were later uploaded. The full clip shows a second, younger-looking cat in the room.[91]

Screening

By 2012, the video of the cat had been viewed 6.5 million times.[92] For a while it was a craze.[93] The clip was included in the 2019 Cat Video Fest which was held at the Vancity Theatre in Vancouver on the 20th of April. There were to be five consecutive screenings of the videos.[94]

Related

The video was referenced in the South Park episode "Faith Hilling", where Johnson's speech pattern ended up causing several deaths related to "Oh Long Johnsoning".[95]

Venus the Two-Faced Cat[edit]

Main article: Venus (cat)

Venus, rescued as a stray in 2009 in North Carolina, United States, has black and ginger sides to her face and one blue and one green eye. She became a viral sensation after being featured on Reddit.[96] Geneticists have discussed whether or not she is a chimera.[97]

Hamilton the Hipster Cat[edit]

Hamilton is a popular Internet cat. He is mostly gray with white fur on his face that represents a mustache.[98] As of March 8, 2020, he has 810 thousand followers on Instagram.[99] He is known as the hipster cat because of the apparent mustache, which is associated with the hipster subculture.[100]

Grandpa Mason[edit]

Mason was an elderly feral male found in the cat colony near the Langley, BC, Canada home of the TinyKittens Society rescue group. Described as "battle-scarred" and as the oldest feral cat the group had ever encountered, he was diagnosed with terminal kidney disease. The group decided to make him as comfortable as possible, believing he would only live a few weeks. To their surprise, when little kittens were allowed into his area of the shelter, he was gentle and relaxed with them. Founder Shelly Roche said later she realized he had been craving "affectionate contact" not from humans but from other cats.[101] Mason lived for almost three years, helping to raise several litters of kittens as their "grandpa". TinyKittens' YouTube channel showed many video clips of Mason with his kittens, and his obituary in September 2019 went viral.[102][103]

Internet memes[edit]

Lolcat[edit]

Main article: Lolcat

A lolcat (pronounced LOL-kat) is an image macro of one or more cats. The image's text is often idiosyncratic and grammatically incorrect. Its use in this way is known as "lolspeak" or "kitty pidgin".

"Lolcat" is a compound word of the acronymic abbreviation for "laugh out loud" (LOL) and the word "cat".[104][105] A synonym for "lolcat" is cat macro, since the images are a type of image macro.[106] Lolcats are commonly designed for photo sharingimageboards and other Internet forums.

Nyan Cat[edit]

Main article: Nyan Cat

Nyan Cat is the name of a YouTube video, uploaded in April 2011, which became an Internet meme. The video merged a Japanese pop song with an animated cartoon cat with the body of a Pop-Tart, flying through space, and leaving a rainbow trail behind it. The video ranked at number 5 on the list of most viewed YouTube videos in 2011.[107]

Keyboard cat[edit]

Main article: Keyboard Cat

Keyboard Cat is another Internet phenomenon. It consists of a video from 1984 of a cat called "Fatso" wearing a blue shirt and "playing" an upbeat rhythm on an electronic keyboard. The video was posted to YouTube under the title "charlie schmidt's cool cats" in June 2007. Schmidt later changed the title to "Charlie Schmidt's Keyboard Cat (The Original)".[108]

Fatso (who died in 1987)[109] was owned (and manipulated in the video) by Charlie Schmidt of Spokane, Washington, United States and the blue shirt still belonged to Schmidt's cat Fatso. Later, Brad O'Farrell, who was the syndication manager of the video website My Damn Channel, obtained Schmidt's permission to reuse the footage, appending it to the end of a blooper video to "play" that person offstage after the mistake or gaffe in a similar manner as getting the hook in the days of vaudeville.[110] The appending of Schmidt's video to other blooper and other viral videos became popular, with such videos usually accompanied with the title Play Him Off, Keyboard Cat or a variant. "Keyboard Cat" was ranked No. 2 on Current TV's list of 50 Greatest Viral Videos.[111]

In 2009 Schmidt became owner of Bento, another cat that resembled Fatso, and which he used to create new Keyboard Cat videos, until Bento's death in March 2018.[112] Schmidt has adopted a new cat "Skinny" or "Keyboard Cat 3.0", which has yet to become popular.

Cats that Look Like Hitler[edit]

Main article: Cats That Look Like Hitler

Cats That Look Like Hitler is a satirical website featuring photographs of cats that bear an alleged resemblance to Adolf Hitler.[113] Most of the cats have a large black splotch underneath their nose, much like the dictator's stumpy toothbrush moustache. The site was founded by Koos Plegt and Paul Neve in 2006,[114] and became widely known after being featured on several television programmes across Europe[114][115][116] and Australia.[117] The site is now only run by Neve. As of February 2013[update], the site contained photographs of over 8,000 cats, submitted by owners with digital cameras and Internet access and then approved by Neve as content.[118]

Everytime you masturbate... God kills a kitten[edit]

Main article: Every time you masturbate... God kills a kitten

"Every time you masturbate... God kills a kitten" is the caption of an image created by a member of the website Fark.com in 2002.[119][120] The image features a kitten (subsequently referred to as "Cliché Kitty") being chased by two Domos, and has the tagline "Please, think of the kittens".

I Can Has Cheezburger[edit]

Main article: I Can Has Cheezburger?

It was created in 2007 by Eric Nakagawa (Cheezburger), a blogger from Hawaii, and his friend Kari Unebasami (Tofuburger).[citation needed] The website is one of the most popular Internet sites of its kind. It received as many as 1,500,000 hits per day at its peak in May 2007.[121][122] ICHC was instrumental in bringing animal-based image macros and lolspeak into mainstream usage and making Internet memes profitable.[123]

Brussels Lockdown[edit]

In 2015, the atmosphere among the community of Brussels, Belgium was tense when the city was put under the highest level state of emergency immediately following the Paris attacks; however, Internet cats were able to cut the tension by taking over the Twitter feed #BrusselsLockdown.[124] The feed was designed to discuss operational details of terrorist raids, but when police asked for a social media blackout the hashtag was overwhelmed by Internet users posting pictures of cats to drown out serious discussion and prevent terrorists from gaining any useful information.[125] The use of cat images is a reference to the Level 4 state of emergency: the French word for the number 4, quatre, is pronounced similarly to the word cat in English.[126][127]

Pusheen[edit]

Main article: Pusheen

Pusheen is another Internet phenomenon about a cartoon cat. Created in 2010 by Claire Belton, the popularity of using emoji and Facebook stickers led to a rise in Pusheen's popularity. She now has 9 million followers.

Bongo Cat[edit]

Main article: Bongo Cat

Bongo Cat is yet another Internet meme about a cartoon cat. It originated on May 7, 2018 when an animated cat gif made by Twitter user "@StrayRogue"[128] was edited by Twitter user "@DitzyFlama",[129] in which he'd edited the GIF to include bongos and added the music "Athletic" from the Super Mario World soundtrack. This cat has since been edited to many other songs, and many different instruments.

Peepee the Cat[edit]

Peepee the cat was the star of a copypasta popularized on Twitter. The post, "i Amn just........... a litle creacher. Thatse It . I Canot change this" was posted on September 18, 2018, and has garnered over 38,000 likes. Over the years, he has become known on the site as a lolcat, and was popular for his seemingly random, but positive posts until his untimely and unfortunate death in April 2019 due to kidney complications related to Feline Immunodeficiency Virus.[130]

Vibing Cat[edit]

In April 2020, a video of a white cat bobbing its head as if dancing went viral.[131] In addition to its popularity on social media sites like Youtube and TikTok, the cat was widely shared on livestreaming platform Twitch.tv, where it was enabled as a emote through third-party service BetterTTV on over 200,000 channels.[132] In December 2020, the official YouTube Channel of the International Cricket Council posted a video named "Vibing cricketers, vibing cat" showing edited footage of the cat alongside various cricketers dancing to music.[133]

Zoom Cat Lawyer/I'm Not a Cat[edit]

Main article: Zoom Cat Lawyer

It refers to a viral video taken from a live stream of a civil forfeiture hearing, and being held on the video conferencing application Zoom in Texas' 394th Judicial District Court. The video features attorney Rod Ponton, who is struggling to disable a cat filter that shows a white kitten mask over his face, resulting in it appearing as a cat is speaking.[134]

Spoofs[edit]

Bonsai Kitten was a satirical website launched in 2000 that claims to provide instructions on how to grow a kitten in a jar, so as to mold the bones of the kitten into the shape of the jar as the cat grows, much like how a bonsai plant is shaped. It was made by an MIT university student going by the alias of Dr. Michael Wong Chang.[135] The website generated furor after members of the public complained to animal rights organizations, who stated that "while the site's content may be faked, the issue it is campaigning for may create violence towards animals", according to the Michigan Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (MSPCA). Although the website in its most recent form was shut down, it still generates (primarily spam) petitions to shut the site down or complain to its ISP. The website has been thoroughly debunked by Snopes.com and The Humane Society of the United States, among other prominent organizations.

Cat media and news websites[edit]

The Catnip Times[edit]

Founded by Laura Mieli in 2012, it has been running full time since 2017.[136] It now has more than a million followers in over 100 countries.[137][138] It contributes articles to American Kennel Club affiliate, AKC Reunite.[139][140][141]

In July 2018, it sponsored the first ever "Meow Meetup" at the Stephens Convention Center in Rosemont. The event which took place over July 21 to the 22nd,[142] was estimated to attract around 3000 people. It was the largest cat conference in the Midwest.[143][144]

News by Cats[edit]

Founded by Lithuanian born Justinas Butkus who lives in Wellington, New Zealand, the site adds a cat element to news stories. Reporting on actual events, it changes the wording to a type of cat talk such as " kidney opurration" instead of kidney operation and " prepurr for major eruption" instead of prepare for major eruption. There were mixed reactions within the first week of the site's operation.[145]

The Purrington Post[edit]

The Purrington Post publishes a news letter. The first, Volume 1, Issue 1 came out on November 1, 2013.[146] According to Natural Pet Science, The Purrington Post averages half a million page views per trimester.[147] It was referred to in September 2018 as an award winning cat blog by the Dow Jones & Company owned financial information service MarketWatch.[148] Also that year it was rated #3 by KittyCoaching.com in a list of the 12 best cat blogs for that year.[149] It was also highly rated by We're All About Cats website in their Top 35 Cat Blogs You Should Know About list for 2018.[150] The opinion of the Post on cat behavior has been valued enough to be quoted in articles such as "Do Cats Smile? Here's How To Tell Your Cat Is Happy, At Least On The Inside" by Romper.[151] News website Eva.ro has used the Post's own article to reference in Daniel Dumitrescu's article about Thor a Bengali, "Tigrișorul de casă: Thor, pisica bengaleză care face senzație pe Instagram".[152][153]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^According to the owners, October 11, 2011 is not the cat's birth date, but the date of his adoption. His birth date is unknown.

References[edit]

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Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cats_and_the_Internet

Crazy Cat Meme Generator

What is the Meme Generator?

It's a free online image maker that lets you add custom resizable text, images, and much more to templates. People often use the generator to customize established memes, such as those found in Imgflip's collection of Meme Templates. However, you can also upload your own templates or start from scratch with empty templates.

How to make a meme

  1. Choose a template. You can use one of the popular templates, search through more than 1 million user-uploaded templates using the search input, or hit "Upload new template" to upload your own template from your device or from a url. For designing from scratch, try searching "empty" or "blank" templates.
  2. Add customizations. Add text, images, stickers, drawings, and spacing using the buttons beside your meme canvas.
  3. Create and share. Hit "Generate Meme" and then choose how to share and save your meme. You can share to social apps or through your phone, or share a link, or download to your device. You can also share with one of Imgflip's many meme communities.

How can I customize my meme?

  • You can move and resize the text boxes by dragging them around. If you're on a mobile device, you may have to first check "enable drag/drop" in the More Options section.
  • You can customize the font color and outline color next to where you type your text.
  • You can further customize the font in the More Options section, and also add additional text boxes. Imgflip supports all web fonts and Windows/Mac fonts including bold and italic, if they are installed on your device. Any other font on your device can also be used. Note that Android and other mobile operating systems may support fewer fonts unless you install them yourself.
  • You can insert popular or custom stickers and other images including scumbag hats, deal-with-it sunglasses, speech bubbles, and more. Opacity and resizing are supported.
  • You can rotate, flip, and crop any templates you upload.
  • You can draw, outline, or scribble on your meme using the panel just above the meme preview image.
  • You can create "meme chains" of multiple images stacked vertically by adding new images with the "below current image" setting.
  • You can remove our subtle imgflip.com watermark (as well as remove ads and supercharge your image creation abilities) using Imgflip Pro or .

Can I use the generator for more than just memes?

Yes! The Meme Generator is a flexible tool for many purposes. By uploading custom images and using all the customizations, you can design many creative works including posters, banners, advertisements, and other custom graphics.

Can I make animated or video memes?

Yes! Animated meme templates will show up when you search in the Meme Generator above (try "party parrot"). If you don't find the meme you want, browse all the GIF Templates or upload and save your own animated template using the GIF Maker.

Do you have a wacky AI that can write memes for me?

Funny you ask. Why yes, we do. Here you go: imgflip.com/ai-meme (warning, may contain vulgarity)

Sours: https://imgflip.com/memegenerator/20406746/Crazy-Cat
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100 Funniest Cat Memes Ever

Cats have been stealing the show on the internet almost since its inception, with pictures of cats being shared on Usenet long before most people even had access to dial-up. However, just over a decade ago, cats went from a thing to the thing online, thanks to YouTube and I Can Haz Cheezburger.

Ever since, people have been making and sharing cat memes, making their favorite felines famous in a wide array of hilarious memes that never fail to crack us up. For your convenience, we've rounded up the wildest, most viral, most laugh-out-loud funny cat memes, each weirder and more wonderful than the last.

Flat earth cat memes

You can bring up this point the next time you get into an argument with a flat earther on Facebook. And there's a reason why cats do this. It turns out that knocking over stationary objects is hunting practice for cats, so buy your cat some more toys if it keeps breaking all your stuff.

Eating plastic cat memes

Sometimes grocery bags smell like the food that was inside of them, plus they make a noise when they move around that cats think is fun, so it's no wonder an old bag is a favorite snack for cats.

ancient cat memes

It's thought that humans began domesticating and living with cats 12,000 years ago, so it's entirely possible that this cat meme is actually true.

Snoozing cat memes

On average, cats sleep around 15 hours every day to provide energy for their predatory behavior, so this meme is equal parts hilarious and accurate.

Bees cat memes

Despite what this popular cat meme says, cats actually purr by vibrating the muscles in their voice boxes. Purring seems continuous because these muscles vibrate during both inhalation and exhalation.

Insurance money cat meme

In Russia, where nearly a million people have dash cams, this cat would have a pretty hard time getting that sweet, sweet payout.

Egyptian cat memes

The cat-human hybrid in this meme is Bast, the ancient Egyptian goddess of warfare. We know she was also sometimes depicted as the embodiment of the Eye of Ra, but we don't know her feelings on cardboard boxes.

Hacker cat memes

Cats use their whiskers to determine if they can fit through narrow spaces. Unfortunately, their whiskers don't tell them this isn't how to turn off automatic Windows updates.

Googly eyed cat meme

Cats show affection by making eye contact, but this probably doesn't work the same way.

Pickup line cat memes

It's a funny meme, but cats appreciate small toys they can bat around more than stuffed animals that will inevitably break their hearts.

Hovercat cat memes

That sunroof might be hot—but not too hot. Because cats use their paws to detect texture and pressure while hunting, they are also incredibly sensitive to temperature.

Grandma's house cat memes

It would take more than a few days at grandma's house for a cat to become record-breakingly fat. The heaviest domestic cat on record was an Australian cat named Himmy that weighed 46.8 pounds at the time of his death in 1986.

Weird kitty cat memes

Although dogs are the more traditional choice of guard animal for homes, Binky, a cat in Indianapolis, managed to ward off a would-be burglar, so it's not entirely impossible.

scaredy cat memes

Cats are notoriously jumpy. Some things they seem to be scared of for no real reason include cucumbers, balloons, and their own reflections.

Hold me back cat memes

Stopping a fight isn't the only social situation a cat is good for. A study published in Anthrozoös found that 76 percent of their female subjects used whether or not their pet liked their date in their evaluation of them.

Aliens cat memes

This kitten's making jokes about aliens, but there is an actual conspiracy theory out there that cats are the aliens.

Most interesting cat memes

If a cat starts biting you after being affectionate, it might be playing with you, or else it's letting you know that it's overstimulated. It might also just be a jerk.

Trusting cat memes

When a cat looks at you and blinks softly, it's called a kitty kiss.

Shelves cat memes

It can't be stressed enough in the world of cat memes that cats loathe having stuff on shelves.

Smoking cat memes

A cat doesn't have to smoke for cigarettes to negatively affect their health. Living with a smoker can double a cat's risk of getting cancer.

Mechanic cat memes

You can't train a cat to fix a car, unfortunately, but you can train a cat to use a toilet, which is more useful on a day-to-day basis.

Fishing cat memes

If your cat likes to fish, keep your aquatic pets safe by putting a roof on your aquarium, and a couple of pieces of masking tape sticky side up to keep your cat away.

Toy cat memes

Cats will play with anything, so buying them toys isn't really a necessity, but if you do buy them toys, make sure to remove any ribbons or feathers that could come off for your cat to eat, because cats love eating things they shouldn't eat almost as much as they love ignoring actual cat toys.

Driving cat memes

In 1989, Saturday Night Live debuted a character named Toonces the Driving Cat that got its own half-hour special three years later. This cat is a markedly better driver than Toonces, who would inevitably drive off a cliff every time he got behind the wheel.

Bamboozled cat memes

"Bamboozle" became a popular word in the vernacular of the internet starting in late 2016.

Inbred cat memes

In actuality, cat breeders have used inbreeding to promote and distinguish features that are breed-specific, which is significantly less fun than sticking a piece of bread on a cat's head.

Other room cat memes

You wouldn't want to try to sneak a whisper past a cat. Their hearing is so sensitive that they can actually hear electrical current.

Empty box cat memes

It's possible these packing pellets can be composted. Some polystyrene is made of corn starch and dissolves in water. Unfortunately, these are on a cat, so getting them wet to find out is probably not a good idea.

Pocketless cat meme

If this cat's having a hard time now, imagine when it figures out it's also not even wearing a shirt.

Yarn cat memes

Don't actually let a cat play with yarn or string. Swallowing it can cause life-threatening internal injuries.

Medusa cat memes

In Greek mythology, Medusa was a female monster with snakes for hair who was so terrifying to look at that gazing at her would turn a person—or cat, in this case—into stone.

Real estate cat memes

A keyboard is warm and close to a cat's owner, making it an ideal resting place for a cat. Not to mention it's incredibly inconvenient. Cats seem to like that too.

Schrodinger cat memes

Schrodinger's cat is a thought experiment about, to put it simply, whether or not a cat inside a box is alive or dead. It was created in 1935 by an Austrian physicist named Erwin Schrodinger.

Spiders cat memes

Cats might destroy all your stuff and leave dead birds on your porch, but they will also kill spiders and bugs for you, which kind of makes up for it.

Weird cat memes

This "weird cat" is actually a beluga whale, which lives in Arctic and sub-Arctic waters and can weigh up to 3,500 pounds.

Box cat memes

In addition to hating things on shelves, how much cat love boxes is another common theme in cat memes.

Napping cat memes

Cats sleep, on average, 15 hours a day, although some cats spend a staggering 20 hours each day asleep.

One-eyed cat memes

Believe it or not, this isn't the only option that exists for cats that lose an eye. Prosthetic eyes for cats are a real and popular option for people with the money to spare.

Empty bowl cat memes

If your cat doesn't eat the food around the sides of the bowl, the bowl might be too narrow. A narrow bowl can cause whisker stress for your cat, which causes discomfort.

Drake cat memes

If a cat twines around your legs while you're walking around, it's trying to show you that it cares about you, not that it wants to kill you by making you fall down a flight of stairs.

Beloved cat memes

This is the true story of a cat named Browser in White Settlement, Texas.

Egg cat memes

This egg would have to come from one big bird. Even an ostrich egg only weighs about three pounds on average.

Xbox cat memes

This is the kind of cat who would probably tell if you got into the catnip.

Snacc cat memes

Spelling words this way is a popular form of meme speak, especially when it comes to talking about dogs.

Hood cat memes

There is actually a Cowboy Cat Ranch in Texas, but the cats don't wear hats. It's a rescue home that does feline research.

Dogs and cats memes

In the never-ending battle between cat people and dog people, you can't deny that dogs are certainly more cheerful than cats.

sharkie cat memes

"Who Would Win" is a popular meme format that pits unlikely foes against each other, like a trillion lions vs. the sun or a stick vs. 1,000 Marines.

Diet cat memes

Cats actually enjoy sitting in boxes so much because it lowers their stress levels.

Need a raise cat memes

This picture is the image that the popular Business Cat image macro meme comes from. It began growing in popularity in 2011.

Lounging cat memes

And owning a cat can be just as beneficial for your health. It lowers stress and increases longevity, just like having human friends does.

Going out cat memes

Seriously folks, cats will steal your cigarettes. It's time to stop smoking.

Surprised cat memes

You might be as surprised as this cat to learn that this is just one of many images of cats being interviewed that have been turned into memes.

Selfie cat memes

Rich people have been blowing money on their pets for a long time. Wealthy people have been commissioning expensive paintings of their pets and horses for hundreds of years.

December cat memes

It's no wonder this cat's not feeling better. The holiday season is one of the most stressful times of the year.

Bread cat memes

Considering how much cats love confined spaces and warm things, being sandwiched between two warm, body-sized loaves of bread is probably heaven on earth for this cat.

High five cat memes

Women are more receptive to dating a pet owner, so maybe the human should be thanking the cat.

Conflicted cat memes

Think twice before you let your cat out. Once a cat becomes an outdoor cat, it kind of ceases to be yours, and will use multiple humans to get its needs met instead.

Airplane cat memes

This box is definitely not airworthy, but making cat condos and costumes from boxes is a great way to help your cat manage its stress.

Plastic cat memes

Just because a cat can fit into a tight space doesn't mean a cat should fit into a tight space.

Handsome cat memes

Domestic cats aren't the only animals that react strangely to their reflection. Big wild cats exhibit the same behavior.

Depressed cat memes

Cats try to be close to the people they care most about, so this one is probably just trying to make its owner feel better.

Conscious cat memes

This is a feline take on the popular Expanding Brain meme, which first started gaining traction in 2017.

Watermelon cat memes

It's a funny picture, but if you feed your cat watermelon, be sure to remove the seeds first, as they can be dangerous to your feline friends.

Poseidon cat memes

In Greek mythology, Poseidon didn't actually have any pets, although he did create horses. However, technically, if there were a cat that lived underwater, that would have fallen under his dominion too.

Sad cat memes

Cats have several ways of communicating with humans vocally, including meows, chirps, and trills, but each cat is different, so you'll have to take time to get to know what yours is trying to tell you.

Ouija cat memes

In ancient Egypt, people had their pets mummified so they could take them into the afterlife, where they could meow at them for food at 2:00 in the morning just like when they were alive.

New legs cat memes

There was a real missed opportunity for a "meow" pun when this cat meme was made.

Studying cat memes

It's unfortunate that so many of the things cats do to show their affection for their owners are so incredibly annoying.

Dream cat memes

Cats should never be given alcohol. It affects them the same as humans, but they only weigh eight pounds, so it's dangerous even in small quantities.

Contract cat memes

Adopting a cat may seem like signing away your freedom to an animal who will disturb you at any given opportunity, but enjoy it while it lasts. The average lifespan of a cat is only 15 years.

Camo cat memes

It makes sense that these two get along. Golden retrievers are one of the most cat-friendly breeds of dogs around.

Abstaining cat memes

More than half the cats in the United States are overweight, which means there are quite a few cats out there that need to shed a few pounds.

Cat tree cat memes

It's estimated that 10 percent of people are allergic to indoor cats and tree pollen is another common allergen, making this cat tree a very itchy nightmare for a good percentage of the population.

Sours: https://bestlifeonline.com/funniest-cat-memes-ever/
Wilfred Warrior part 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6
  • Fall 2019 has given us a change of season and a brand new meme: "Woman yelling at a cat," otherwise known as "the cat meme."
  • The viral photo is a mashup of a blonde woman yelling at a confused looking white cat sitting in front of a plate of vegetables.
  • After seeing the meme everywhere, OprahMag.com checked in with titular "woman," Real Housewives of Beverly Hills alumTaylor Armstrong, who shared her reaction to the viral meme.

The leaves are falling, the first real snowfall of the year has hit certain parts of the world, and the internet has a new meme it's fallen in love with. Picture it: Two images, side by side. One features a teary-eyed woman angrily yelling, another captures a particularly angry looking cat. Yes, the internet is in love with the Woman Yelling At A Cat meme; the phenomenon even made its way into a few Halloween costumes.

But what is the cat meme, exactly, and how did it become so popular? Well, firstly, the meme's virality is due to simple happenstance, of course. The images had each been used individually as memes themselves—and both have separate origins—but once put together, they became magic.

So if—like we were—you're wondering how this all came about, we've broken it down for you, finding some of the internet's best examples, and even talking to the woman in question, Taylor Armstrong. Here's everything we know about the woman yelling at a cat meme you're seeing all over your social media feeds.


Alright, where did this "woman yelling at a cat" meme start?

The human half of the meme finds its origins from a 2011 episode of The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills, where then-cast member Taylor Armstrong found herself in an emotional confrontation with Camille Grammer, as fellow housewife Kyle Richards attempts to calm her down.

This content is imported from YouTube. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

"During the screaming scene, I was truly terrified for my life and my safety. When I look back now, that life seems like someone else’s," Armstrong tells OprahMag.com. "I have healed and grown so much stronger since that moment and am in such a happy place with my husband and daughter. I never imagined of all my TV moments, that would be the one to become a 'meme' sensation."

While this may be a way to heal from a painful experience, Armstrong understands why she's prime for memeable moments and GIFs. "I think I am easily meme-able because I can be very animated, especially when I am upset! There is quite a bit of Housewivescontent of me screaming, crying, eye rolling and laughing to choose from. I guess I created the Taylor gallery for memers to use and create."

As for the other half of the meme starring the angry white cat, its origins began on Tumblr, when user deadbefordeath posted a photograph of a white cat with a bewildered expression sitting in a chair in front of a plate of vegetables. The caption back then was: "he no like vegetals."

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And before you ask—yes, "the cat" has a name: Smudge. And you can follow him on Instagram.


When did the cat meme go viral?

It looks like back in May, the first version of the meme appeared on Twitter:

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But the conventional form of the meme—which features the image of Armstrong and Smudge expressing differing opinions, also known as "object labeling" in the meme lexicon—first took off on Reddit, the breeding ground for meme culture.

Armstrong told OprahMag.com that she first saw the meme back in August. "It was 'Boomers' 'Millennials' and 'Gen X' featuring Megan Mullally from Will & Grace. Her character, Karen, is fabulous, so it was fun to share a meme moment with her. She and I were featured in a fun Halloween one also. I thought the first scream meme would be the last...I never expected all the future memes to come."

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Part of the reason for the meme's virality is due to Armstrong's engagement with people who tag her in their social media posts—and in particular, this clapback when she went uncredited for her work in meme history:

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She'll even interact with you IRL if she runs into you in costume: "The fact that people have come up with so many versions is pretty amazing. I ran into someone at a Halloween party dressed as the cat so, of course, we took the photo op for me to 'yell' at him."

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Can I see some of the best ones woman yelling at a cat memes?

Of course you can! We've gathered some of the best of the best for you to chuckle at:

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This content is imported from Instagram. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

This content is imported from Instagram. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

This content is imported from Instagram. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

This content is imported from Instagram. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

Armstrong was even willing to let us know which is her personal favorite. "There are so many creative ones, it’s hard to choose a 'best of,' but the baseball altercation between me as the Washington Nationals’ Manager and the Cat as the umpire made me laugh. The fact that it came out the day after the game was so timely. The Terminator version is another 'best of.'"

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"When the memes started, I would share or respond on social media because I thought they were creative and funny," Armstrong shared. "When the 'woman yelling at cat' meme came about, I was puzzled. Kyle Richards and I have been exchanging the memes sent to us, laughing and scratching our heads as to why."

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But Armstrong has one more thing to let you know, in case you were concerned she and Smudge had real beef: "It’s all in good fun and—by the way...I do like cats."

We have yet to hear from Smudge the cat, but once we do, we'll update for comment. But we have a feeling Smudge might be too famous now to talk to OprahMag.com.


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Sours: https://www.oprahdaily.com/entertainment/a29739536/cat-meme-taylor-armstrong-explained/

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