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Wafer Capacity by Feature Size Shows Strongest Growth at <10nm>

Network, cellphone, and graphics processors drive demand for leading edge processes.

November 17, 2020 -- IC capacity for leading-edge (<10nm) processes is expected to grow and become the largest portion of monthly installed capacity across the industry beginning in 2024, based on information in IC Insights’ Global Wafer Capacity 2020-2024 report. At the end of 2020, <10nm capacity is expected to account for 10% of the IC industry’s total wafer capacity, and then is forecast to rise above 20% for the first time in 2022, and increase to 30% of worldwide capacity in 2024 (Figure 1). What constitutes a generation and how to measure the minimum process geometry gets more difficult every year. Therefore, any assumptions made regarding the wafer fab capacity of new process technologies can have a big impact on the forecast for wafer capacity by minimum feature size.

Figure 1

There is tremendous motivation to continue shrinking minimum geometries because the benefits are many: higher speed, lower power consumption, lower cost per unit area, etc., but there comes a point where diminishing returns make chip designers question whether the high cost is worth it. The cost benefits of scaling aren’t what they used to be.

Equipment costs associated with <10nm process technologies have soared to the point where they have become prohibitive for many IC suppliers. Consequently, only Samsung, TSMC, and Intel currently operate fabs using <10nm process technology.

Meanwhile, design difficulties (for example, continuing to shrink DRAM and NAND flash memory cells) stand in the way of the scaling methods that the IC industry has used for many years. Challenges are also mounting for complex logic-based chips such as microprocessors, ASICs, FPGAs, and other advanced logic devices.

IC Insights believes the pace of migration of finer feature sizes for complex logic-based chips will continue slowing as chip designers find it increasingly difficult to justify the higher costs. For applications that greatly benefit from higher speeds, lower power consumption, etc, there will be healthy demand for the leading-edge finFET processes and beyond. The roll out of half-step generations or enhanced versions of existing processes is also contributing to more time passing between each new generation node.

Other findings from the Global Wafer Capacity 2020-2024 report include,

  • In 2020 48% of all wafer capacity is expected to be for devices having minimum geometries (or equivalent minimum geometries) smaller than 20nm (10.0% at <10nm; 38.4% at 10-20nm). Such devices include high-density DRAM and high-density 3D NAND flash with equivalent 10nm-class technology, high-performance microprocessors, low-power application processors, and advanced ASIC/ASSP/FPGA devices based on 16/14nm, 12/10nm, or 7/5nm technologies.
  • South Korea, with 66% of its capacity dedicated to <20nm process technology, remains significantly more leading-edge focused than the other regions or countries. Given Samsung and SK Hynix’s emphasis on high-density DRAM, flash memory, and Samsung’s applications processors, it is not a surprise that the country has the highest concentration of wafer capacity dedicated to leading-edge processes.
  • Apple, Huawei, and Qualcomm use TSMC’s leading-edge logic foundry services. As a result, Taiwan’s total <20nm capacity stands at more than 35%. Nevertheless, the 28nm, 45/40nm, and 65nm generations continue to generate significant business volumes for foundries like TSMC and UMC.
  • Most <20nm capacity in China is owned and controlled by foreign companies, namely Samsung, SK Hynix, Intel, and TSMC. YMTC and SMIC are the only China-based companies that offer <20nm process technology.

Report Details: Global Wafer Capacity 2020-2024

IC Insights’ Global Wafer Capacity 2020-2024—Detailed Analysis and Forecast of the IC Industry’s Wafer Fab Capacity report assesses the IC industry’s capacity by wafer size, minimum process geometry, technology type, geographic region, and device type through 2024. The report includes detailed profiles of the companies with the greatest fab capacity and gives comprehensive specifications on existing wafer fab facilities. Global Wafer Capacity 2020-2024 is priced at $4,890 for an individual user license. A multi-user worldwide corporate license is available for $7,590.


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Network, cellphone, and graphics processors drive demand for leading edge processes.

November 17, 2020 -- IC capacity for leading-edge (<10nm) processes is expected to grow and become the largest portion of monthly installed capacity across the industry beginning in 2024, based on information in IC Insights’ Global Wafer Capacity 2020-2024 report. At the end of 2020, <10nm capacity is expected to account for 10% of the IC industry’s total wafer capacity, and then is forecast to rise above 20% for the first time in 2022, and increase to 30% of worldwide capacity in 2024 (Figure 1). What constitutes a generation and how to measure the minimum process geometry gets more difficult every year. Therefore, any assumptions made regarding the wafer fab capacity of new process technologies can have a big impact on the forecast for wafer capacity by minimum feature size.

Figure 1

There is tremendous motivation to continue shrinking minimum geometries because the benefits are many: higher speed, lower power consumption, lower cost per unit area, etc., but there comes a point where diminishing returns make chip designers question whether the high cost is worth it. The cost benefits of scaling aren’t what they used to be.

Equipment costs associated with <10nm process technologies have soared to the point where they have become prohibitive for many IC suppliers. Consequently, only Samsung, TSMC, and Intel currently operate fabs using <10nm process technology.

Meanwhile, design difficulties (for example, continuing to shrink DRAM and NAND flash memory cells) stand in the way of the scaling methods that the IC industry has used for many years. Challenges are also mounting for complex logic-based chips such as microprocessors, ASICs, FPGAs, and other advanced logic devices.

IC Insights believes the pace of migration of finer feature sizes for complex logic-based chips will continue slowing as chip designers find it increasingly difficult to justify the higher costs. For applications that greatly benefit from higher speeds, lower power consumption, etc, there will be healthy demand for the leading-edge finFET processes and beyond. The roll out of half-step generations or enhanced versions of existing processes is also contributing to more time passing between each new generation node.

Other findings from the Global Wafer Capacity 2020-2024 report include,

  • In 2020 48% of all wafer capacity is expected to be for devices having minimum geometries (or equivalent minimum geometries) smaller than 20nm (10.0% at <10nm; 38.4% at 10-20nm). Such devices include high-density DRAM and high-density 3D NAND flash with equivalent 10nm-class technology, high-performance microprocessors, low-power application processors, and advanced ASIC/ASSP/FPGA devices based on 16/14nm, 12/10nm, or 7/5nm technologies.
  • South Korea, with 66% of its capacity dedicated to <20nm process technology, remains significantly more leading-edge focused than the other regions or countries. Given Samsung and SK Hynix’s emphasis on high-density DRAM, flash memory, and Samsung’s applications processors, it is not a surprise that the country has the highest concentration of wafer capacity dedicated to leading-edge processes.
  • Apple, Huawei, and Qualcomm use TSMC’s leading-edge logic foundry services. As a result, Taiwan’s total <20nm capacity stands at more than 35%. Nevertheless, the 28nm, 45/40nm, and 65nm generations continue to generate significant business volumes for foundries like TSMC and UMC.
  • Most <20nm capacity in China is owned and controlled by foreign companies, namely Samsung, SK Hynix, Intel, and TSMC. YMTC and SMIC are the only China-based companies that offer <20nm process technology.

Report Details: Global Wafer Capacity 2020-2024

IC Insights’ Global Wafer Capacity 2020-2024—Detailed Analysis and Forecast of the IC Industry’s Wafer Fab Capacity report assesses the IC industry’s capacity by wafer size, minimum process geometry, technology type, geographic region, and device type through 2024. The report includes detailed profiles of the companies with the greatest fab capacity and gives comprehensive specifications on existing wafer fab facilities. Global Wafer Capacity 2020-2024 is priced at $4,890 for an individual user license. A multi-user worldwide corporate license is available for $7,590.

Sours: https://www.design-reuse.com/news/49026/wafer-capacity-10nm.html

Top Five Wafer Capacity Leaders Raise Share of Global Capacity to 54%

Foundries and memory IC suppliers maintain strongest capacity presence.

IC Insights recently released its new Global Wafer Capacity 2021-2025 report that provides in-depth detail, analyses, and forecasts for IC industry capacity by wafer size, process geometry, region, and product type through 2025. Included in the report is a ranking of the 25 largest wafer capacity leaders in terms of monthly installed capacity in 200mm-equivalents as of December 2020.

Each of the top-five wafer capacity leaders had capacity of at least 1.5 million wafer starts per month (Figure 1). The combined capacity of the top five companies represented 54% of total global wafer capacity in December 2020, up one point from 53% in 2019.  For comparison, in the year 2009, the top 10 wafer capacity leaders held 54% of total global capacity and the top five leaders accounted for 36% of capacity.

Figure 1

After the top five, wafer capacity at other semiconductor leaders quickly falls off. Intel (884K wafers/month), UMC (772K wafers/month), GlobalFoundries, Texas Instruments, and SMIC rounded out the top 10 capacity leaders.

• Samsung had the most installed wafer capacity with 3.1 million 200mm-equivalent wafers per month.  That represented 14.7% of the world’s total capacity.  Capacity growth in 2020 appears lower than expected because the company’s Line 13 fab was partially excluded from 2020 since a portion of the fab was converted from DRAM to image sensor production in 2020.  If all of Line 13 was included in 2020, Samsung’s capacity growth would have been 11%. Much of Samsung’s huge 2020 expenditures will show up in 2021 capacity numbers, especially since $10.5 billion of its total 2020 outlays of $28.1 billion was spent in 4Q20.

• Second in line was the largest pure-play foundry in the world TSMC with about 2.7 million wafers per month capacity, or 13.1% of total worldwide capacity.  In 2020, the company opened the first two phases of a new fab complex near its Fab 14 site in Tainan, Taiwan.  Phases 1 and 2 of Fab 18 are in mass production and the facilities for Phases 3-6 are under construction.  TSMC also opened a Phase 10 line at Fab 15 in Taichung, Taiwan, during 2020.

• Micron had the third largest amount of capacity at the end of 2020 with a little more than 1.9 million wafers, or 9.3% of worldwide capacity.  The company’s capital expenditures in 2020 were mostly for upgrading existing fabs with more advanced equipment, but some new capacity was being added at its fab sites in Hiroshima, Japan, and Taichung, Taiwan.  A second fab is being built in Manassas, Virginia, where the company manufactures long-lifecycle products.

• The fourth largest capacity holder at the end of 2020 was SK Hynix with nearly 1.9 million in monthly wafer capacity (9.0% of total worldwide capacity), with more than 80% of it being used to make DRAMs and NAND flash chips.  The company completed two new large fabs in 2019 in Cheongju, Korea, and Wuxi, China.  A new Fab M16 at its site in Icheon, Korea, is due to start mass production in 2021.

• Rounding out the top 5 companies was another memory IC supplier Kioxia with 1.6 million wafers/month (7.7% of total worldwide capacity) including a substantial amount of NAND flash memory capacity for its fab investment and technology development partner Western Digital.  In 2020, the partners opened a new 300mm wafer fab in Kitakami, Japan.  Construction on Fab 7 at the complex in Yokkaichi, Japan, will start in 2021.

• The industry’s five biggest pure-play foundries—TSMC, UMC, GlobalFoundries, SMIC, and Powerchip (including Nexchip)—are each ranked within the top 12 capacity leaders.  In total, these five foundries had a combined capacity of about 5.1 million wafers per month as of December 2020, representing about 24% of the total fab capacity in the world.

Report Details:  Global Wafer Capacity 2021-2025

IC Insights’ Global Wafer Capacity 2021-2025—Detailed Analysis and Forecast of the IC Industry’s Wafer Fab Capacity report assesses the IC industry’s capacity by wafer size, minimum process geometry, technology type, geographic region, and device type through 2025. The report includes detailed profiles of the companies with the greatest fab capacity and gives comprehensive specifications on existing wafer fab facilities. Global Wafer Capacity 2021-2025 is priced at $4,890 for an individual user license.  A multi-user worldwide corporate license is available for $7,590.  The Internet access password and the information accessible to download will be available through November 2021.

https://www.icinsights.com/services/global-wafer-capacity/pricing-order-forms/

Sours: https://www.icinsights.com/news/bulletins/Top-Five-Wafer-Capacity-Leaders-Raise-Share-Of-Global-Capacity-To-54/
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Top five chip makers dominate global wafer capacity

Samsung and TSMC dominate global wafer capacity for chip making says the latest report from IC Insights. The top five suppliers account for 54 percent of the wafer market.

The Global Wafer Capacity 2021-2025 report includes the 25 largest wafer capacity leaders in terms of monthly installed capacity in 200mm-equivalents as of December 2020. While there has been focus on TSMC as a pure foundry, Samsung is a significantly larger user of wafers for its memory chips and in-house processors.

Each of the top-five wafer capacity leaders had capacity of at least 1.5 million wafer starts per month. The combined capacity of the top five companies represented 54 per cent of total global wafer capacity in December 2020, up one point from 53 per cent in 2019.

For comparison, it was the top 10 wafer capacity leaders that held 54 percent of total global capacity in 2009 and the top five leaders accounted for 36 percent of capacity.

After the top five, wafer capacity at other semiconductor leaders quickly falls off. Intel (884K wafers/month), UMC (772K wafers/month), GlobalFoundries, Texas Instruments, and SMIC rounded out the top 10 capacity leaders.

Samsung had the most installed wafer capacity with 3.1 million 200mm-equivalent wafers per month.  That represented 14.7 per cent of the world’s total capacity.  Capacity growth in 2020 appears lower than expected because the company’s Line 13 fab was partially excluded from 2020 since a portion of the fab was converted from DRAM to image sensor production in 2020.  If all of Line 13 was included in 2020, Samsung’s capacity growth would have been 11 percent.  Much of Samsung’s huge 2020 expenditures will show up in 2021 capacity numbers, especially since $10.5 billion of its total 2020 outlays of $28.1 billion was spent in 4Q20.

As the largest pure-play foundry in the world, TSMC uses 2.7 million wafers per month capacity, or 13.1 per cent of total worldwide capacity.

Sours: https://www.eenewseurope.com/news/top-five-chip-makers-dominate-global-wafer-capacity
Sand to Silicon - the Making of a Chip (full screen) - Intel

Five Semiconductor Companies Hold 53% of Global Wafer Capacity

Leaders in memory IC and foundry production maintain strongest capacity presence.

IC Insights recently released its new Global Wafer Capacity 2020-2024 report that provides in-depth detail, analyses, and forecasts for IC industry capacity by wafer size, process geometry, region, and product type through 2024.

Included in the report is a ranking of the 25 largest wafer capacity leaders in terms of monthly installed capacity in 200mm-equivalents as of December 2019. The world’s top-five wafer capacity leaders each had capacity of more than 1,000,000 wafer starts per month (Figure 1). Combined capacity of the top five companies represented 53% of total global wafer capacity at the end of 2019.  In contrast, the top five capacity leaders in 2009 held 36% of worldwide capacity.  Capacity at other semiconductor leaders, including Intel (817K wafers/month), UMC (753K wafers/month), GlobalFoundries, Texas Instruments, and STMicro, fell off rapidly from the top five.

Figure 1

•As of December 2019, Samsung had the most installed wafer capacity with 2.9 million 200mm-equivalent wafers per month.  That represented 15.0% of the world’s total capacity and about two-thirds of it was used for the fabrication of DRAM and NAND flash memory devices.  Major construction projects underway include large new fabs at its sites in Hwaseong and Pyeongtaek, Korea, and in Xi’an, China.

•Second in line was TSMC, the largest pure-play foundry in the world, with about 2.5 million wafers per month capacity, or 12.8% of total worldwide capacity.  The company has been adding a new facility at its Fab 15 complex (the Phase 9/Phase 10 building) in Taichung, Taiwan, and building a new fab (Fab 18) near its Fab 14 complex in Tainan, Taiwan.

•Micron had the third largest amount of capacity at the end of 2019 with a little more than 1.8 million wafers, or 9.4% of worldwide capacity.  Micron’s growth in capacity for 2019 was boosted by the opening of a new 300mm wafer fab at its site in Singapore.  The company also acquired Intel’s share of their IM Flash joint-venture fab in Lehi, Utah.  In 2020, Micron plans to open a second fab in Manassas, Virginia.

•The fourth largest capacity holder at the end of 2019 was SK Hynix with a monthly wafer capacity of nearly 1.8 million wafers (8.9% of total worldwide capacity).  More than 80% of it was used to make DRAM and NAND flash chips.  In 2019, the company completed construction on its new M15 wafer fab in Cheongju, Korea, and a new fab (C2F) at its site in Wuxi, China.  Its next big fab project is Fab M16 at its site in Icheon, Korea.

•Rounding out the top 5 companies was memory IC supplier Kioxia (formerly Toshiba Memory) with 1.4 million wafers/month (7.2% of total worldwide capacity), including a substantial amount of NAND flash memory capacity for its fab investment and technology development partner Western Digital.  The capacity for Toshiba Electronic Devices is not included in the Kioxia numbers.

•The industry’s five biggest pure-play foundries—TSMC, GlobalFoundries, UMC, SMIC, and Powerchip (including Nexchip)—are each ranked among the top 12 capacity leaders.  In total, these five foundries had a combined capacity of about 4.8 million wafers per month as of December 2019, representing about 24% of the total fab capacity in the world.

Report Details:  Global Wafer Capacity 2020-2024

IC Insights’ Global Wafer Capacity 2020-2024—Detailed Analysis and Forecast of the IC Industry’s Wafer Fab Capacity report assesses the IC industry’s capacity by wafer size, minimum process geometry, technology type, geographic region, and device type through 2024. The report includes detailed profiles of the companies with the greatest fab capacity and gives comprehensive specifications on existing wafer fab facilities. Global Wafer Capacity 2020-2024 is priced at $4,890 for an individual user license.  A multi-user worldwide corporate license is available for $7,590.

Sours: https://www.icinsights.com/news/bulletins/Five-Semiconductor-Companies-Hold-53-Of-Global-Wafer-Capacity/

Capacity intel wafer

Capacity leaders in each wafer size

TSMC has the largest capacity in the main wafer sizes, with Intel No.6 in 12 inch and ST No.2 in 8 inch and No.5 in the ≤150mm category, reports IC Insights in its Global Wafer Capacity 2021-2025 report. Infineon is No.4 in eight inch.

Figure 1. compares the relative amounts of capacity held by the top 10 leaders.


Figure 1

As of December 2020, only TSMC—the world’s largest foundry—was listed among the wafer capacity leaders in each of the three wafer size categories.  It had the most 200mm wafer capacity last year and ranked second, trailing only Samsung, in 300mm wafer capacity.

 These companies offer the types of ICs that benefit most from using the largest wafer size available to best amortize the manufacturing cost per die.  Moreover, they have the means to continue investing large sums of money in new and improved 300mm fab capacity.

Wafer capacity leaders in the 200mm size category consist of pure-play foundries and manufacturers that emphasize analog/mixed-signal ICs and microcontrollers.

The ranking for the smaller wafer sizes (i.e., ≤150mm) includes a more diversified group of companies, with two Chinese companies at the top.  China Resources Microelectronics (CR Micro) and Silan Microelectronics both have very large 150mm fabs used mainly for the production of analog/mixed-signal ICs, power devices, and discrete semiconductors.

STMicroelectronics used to have a huge amount of 150mm wafer capacity for production of ICs at its fab site in Singapore but the company restructured its fab operations there in recent years. One fab was largely converted to manufacture MEMS-based microfluidic products (e.g., inkjet heads, lab-on-chip devices, etc.) and other fabs were upgraded to process 200mm wafers.

As the industry has moved IC fabrication onto larger wafers in bigger fabs, the number of IC manufacturers has continued to shrink.

The Global Wafer Capacity study shows that as of December 2020, there were 63 companies that owned and operated a 200mm wafer fab (Figure 2).

There were 28 companies that owned and operated a 300mm wafer fab. Furthermore, the distribution of 300mm wafer capacity among those manufacturers is top-heavy with the five biggest manufacturers controlling about three-quarters (74%) of the global 300mm IC capacity.


Figure 2

2021-02-25Sours: https://www.electronicsweekly.com/news/business/capacity-leaders-wafer-size-2021-02/
Why are Processors Square (and Wafers Circular)?

Massive Fab Expansion to Change Geographical Mix of Supply

May 13, 2021

|In Blogs

|By Dale Gai

  • Counterpoint estimates a 21% increase (CAGR) in the average annual wafer capacity of leading-edge logic (non-memory) IC nodes (defined by 10nm and below) for worldwide foundries and IDMs during 2021-2027.
  • The US is expected to increase its capacity share from 18% to 24% between 2021 and 2027, compared to Taiwan’s 40%, supported by the US government’s funding under the CHIPS for America Act.
  • From a regional perspective, Taiwan and South Korea combined are projected to account for a majority (57%) of capacity globally in 2027. China will be far behind at 6% after 3-5 years from now, due to lack of manufacturing equipment on intensified levels of geopolitical competitions.
  • From a demand perspective, the leading-edge monthly wafer consumption for each long/big node (such as 14/12nm and 7/6nm) is about 250,000-270,000 in 2021. We estimate this to increase to 300,000-320,000 by 2025, driven by mainstream 5G smartphones and data centre processors besides longer production lead time. We do not see major oversupply risks after three years despite massive capacity expansion plans.    

In this note, we deal with two most asked questions from supply chains amid a global IC chipset shortage and new capacity expansion announcements during the past 3-4 months:

  • Will the global logic IC fab landscape get altered in terms of geographical locations after the massive capex increase planned by industry leaders is implemented?
  • Will we encounter capacity oversupply after these new leading-edge fabs enter mass production?

The questions raised above could be looked at in the context of TSMC’s statement in March which warned of possible double-booking of wafer orders. The bullwhip effect could eventually lead to an inflection point of demand/supply reverse in the next few months. Furthermore, the political uncertainties and climate concerns surrounding Taiwan raise the risk of a global industrial disruption due to the concentration of global chip manufacturing in the country.

Most of the capex plans of industry leaders, including TSMC, Samsung and Intel, aim to build greenfield fabs in the next few years. The leading-edge nodes are the focus of their capacity expansion plans, which start at $15-20 billion as the minimum investment to reach the production scale.

Fab capacity by regions

Counterpoint’s Foundry Service data provides current capacity/production shares across all regions. In the light of recent developments, we update our forecast for a complete analysis of the logic (non-memory) IC industry. For 2021, we see 55% of wafer capacity below 10nm (including all current nodes in N10, N7, N5 and N3/N2 in the future) located in Taiwan, followed by South Korea (20%) and the US (18%). TSMC and Samsung Foundry (LSI) represent all the lines in Taiwan and South Korea respectively, while Intel is the major one in the US to ramp up its 10nm CPU lines during the two years.

Moving ahead, the total built-in wafer capacity in the leading-edge nodes in 2025 is estimated to increase by more than two times, primarily at the companies based in Taiwan (TSMC’s 3/2nm), South Korea and the US, when Intel, TSMC and (likely) Samsung start to ramp up their new facilities in Arizona and Texas. We believe that under the CHIPS for America Act, both local and foreign players will be pushed to follow production schedules to avail government support. Therefore, we forecast that the US’ capacity share will get boosted to 21%, surpassing South Korea’s, with the majority of nodes in the US on 5nm and in Intel on 7nm. We also notice that Intel’s expanded overseas fab production, including in Ireland and Israel, will help the EMEA region grow capacity shares in leading-edge technologies. However, our forecast excludes the possibility of Europe introducing subsidies to lure investments in new fabs.

Counterpoint Research Leading-edge logic (non-memory) capacity breakdown by locationsPredicting the regional shift in the long term (2027) based on current visibility, TSMC is likely to add more phases in Arizona after the initial 20Kwpm (wafer per month) investment to reach the mega fab scales it has in Taiwan. Intel too may take its US capacity more seriously during the period. However, compared to the large global expansion cycle forecast for 2021-2025, there will be a modest addition in the capacity during 2025-2027, with Taiwan, South Korea and the US accounting for 40%, 17% and 24% shares respectively.

In contrast, China is forecast to take just 5-6% share in leading-edge fabs in the next 3-5 years. We expect the import restrictions on equipment for 10nm nodes (and below) to persist for a considerable period, forcing local foundry/IDM makers like SMIC to increase capacities in matured nodes.

Wafer demand-supply outlook for advanced nodes

We estimate a 21% increase (CAGR) in the average annual wafer capacity of leading-edge logic (non-memory) IC nodes (defined by 10nm and below) for worldwide foundries and IDMs during 2021-2027.

Counterpoint Research Global logic fab capacity breakdown in leading-edge nodesOur forecast indicates an aggressive build-up in capacity after a multi-year under-investment which became the root cause of the current IC component crunch. We estimate that a capacity of 160Kwpm (wafer per month) at 7nm and 100Kwpm at 5nm will be added globally in 2025. It includes Intel’s expanded 7nm in its global fabs, and TSMC and Samsung’s new fabs in the US.

From a demand perspective, the mega trend of digital transformation will drive more new applications in mainstream 5G smartphones, data centre processors and autonomous driving (L4/5) in the next few years. In 2021, the total monthly wafer demand of each big/long node generation, such as 16/14nm and 7/6nm in logic IC fabs, is expected to be 250,000-270,000. In 2025, the monthly wafer demand is projected to increase to 300,000-320,000 for each leading-edge node. We expect the global wafer demand and supply for N5 and N7 nodes to be more balanced in 2025, after the massive new line constructions in the next 2-3 years. However, we do not expect any oversupply situation without a serious decline in global semiconductor demand.

ComponentsFab CapacityFoundrySemiconductorsWafer Chips

Dale Gai

Research Director
Dale is a Research Director based out of Taiwan. At Counterpoint, he is part of our semiconductor and components research team.
Before Counterpoint, he was the primary analyst covering Asia semiconductor at Mizuho securities. Prior, he was with Barclays and Citigroup covering technology hardware. Before becoming a sell-side equity research analyst he worked with Cypress Semi and Andersen Consulting (now Accenture).

All author posts
Sours: https://www.counterpointresearch.com/massive-fab-expansion-to-change-geographical-mix-of-supply/

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The company also ramped its new 10nm process this year. Intel currently manufactures 10nm products in high volumes at its Oregon and Arizona sites in the U.S. and its site in Israel

Intel has doubled its combined 14nm and 10nm manufacturing capacity over the past few years. To do this, the company found innovative ways to deliver more output within existing capacity through yield improvement projects and significant investments in capacity expansion.

“Over the last three years, we have doubled our wafer volume capacity, and that was a significant investment. Moving forward, we’re not stopping… We are continuing to invest into factory capacity to ensure we can keep up with the growing needs of our customers,” says Keyvan Esfarjani, senior vice president and general manager of Manufacturing and Operations at Intel.

The company also ramped its new 10nm process this year. Intel currently manufactures 10nm products in high volumes at its Oregon and Arizona sites in the U.S. and its site in Israel.

In 2020, Intel introduced an expanding lineup of 10nm products including 11th Gen Intel® CoreTM processors and the Intel Atom® P5900, a system-on-chip for wireless base stations. In addition, the company introduced 10nm SuperFin technology, which enables the largest single intranode enhancement in Intel’s history and delivers performance improvements comparable to a full-node transition.

Esfarjani explains, “10nm progress is coming along quite well. We have three high-volume manufacturing operations that are going full steam ahead to see how we can do more, better and faster, and continue to support our customers.

Taiwan-based chip manufacturer MediaTek had recently acquired Intel’s power management chip business, Enpirion. The deal, estimated to be worth $85 million, was done through Mediatek’s subsidiary compan Richtek. It will soon be presented to regulators for approval.

SK hynix and Intel had recently announced that they had signed an agreement under which SK hynix would acquire Intel’s NAND memory and storage business for US $9 billion. The transaction includes the NAND SSD business, the NAND component and wafer business, and the Dalian NAND memory manufacturing facility in China. Intel will retain its distinct Intel Optane business.

EFY Bureau

Sours: https://www.electronicsb2b.com/headlines/intel-has-doubled-its-wafer-capacity-in-last-three-years-keyvan-esfarjani/


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