Intel nuke

Intel nuke DEFAULT

Intel is updating its Next Unit of Computing (NUC) lineup of miniature computers with its 11th Gen processors, and it’s again including a gaming-focused model. The NUC 11 Enthusiast is a follow-up to the NUC 8 Hades Canyon from 2018, which managed to pack triple-A gaming performance (not to mention I/O that rivaled a full-size desktop) into a tiny enclosure.

Included in the refresh are updates to the company’s more traditional small-cube NUC Performance Mini computers, which previously had 10th Gen processors. The upgrade brings Wi-Fi 6 and Intel Xe graphics to the i5 and i7 models. Intel has also added a NUC Pro line, some of which have vPro-enabled CPUs and all of which can drive 8K displays. There’s also a NUC 11 compute unit, which is just a board meant to be integrated into future computers. This isn’t the first time Intel has had that idea, but we’ll get more into that in just a moment.

Image: Intel

NUCs, however, are notable because of their size, and while the Performance and Pro lines are indeed very small, they’re more minor updates to what we already had before. What’s more interesting is the gaming version.

Image: Intel

The NUC 11 Enthusiast, codenamed “Phantom Canyon,” promises gaming performance with a 28W quad-core i7-1165G7 (the same found in the 2020 Dell XPS 13) and an RTX 2060, which was made outdated the day before Intel’s announcement of the computer. It also keeps the stacked I/O that made the last generation great, including two Thunderbolt 4 ports, 2.5Gb Ethernet, a whopping six USB 3.2 Type-A ports, and Wi-Fi 6. The lack of HDMI 2.1 (it only has 2.0b) can be somewhat forgiven due to the inclusion of a Mini DisplayPort 1.4 output. And again, all of this is fitting inside an enclosure that’s roughly the size of a hefty book.

Image: Intel

Like the other NUC models, the Enthusiast also has Xe integrated graphics, which should be good for streamers or creative professionals that enjoy Intel’s Quick Sync video encoding technology. While it’s a shame about the almost-up-to-date graphics card, the computer should still provide a good amount of gaming performance in an absolutely diminutive package, and I’m glad to see Intel’s still working on mini gaming PCs.

Intel has a long history of trying to make the NUC into a miniature gaming PC with full-sized performance. It even teamed up with AMD to put dedicated Vega graphics into the NUC 8, which was clearly hoping to appeal to gamers more than office workers, with a glowing skull logo emblazoned on the top. Then, at CES 2020, it showed off the NUC 9 Extreme, which aimed to be a gaming PC with an easy-to-upgrade compute unit. Except Intel, so far, hasn’t released any updates for the compute units, so at the moment, it’s just an expensive and modular-for-no-reason gaming PC.

Intel hasn’t released pricing and availability yet, but SimplyNUC.com has the Phantom Canyon starting at $1,349. That looks to be a better deal than the NUC 9 Extreme, which is $1,599 on the same site and also requires a separate mini graphics card. It also beats its more direct predecessor, the NUC 8 Hades Canyon, which is still $1,234 for nearly two-year-old hardware.

Intel appears to be using the same strategy it’s used for the NUC computers in the past, where people can buy either a complete computer or a kit where they’ll be required to provide the RAM, storage drive, and OS. SimplyNUC’s $1,349 model has the drive and RAM, but you will have to pay extra for or bring your own copy of Windows.

Sours: https://www.theverge.com/2021/1/14/22231244/intel-nuc-11-pc-announcement-includes-mini-gaming-computer

Intel NUC 11 Extreme review: A tiny gaming desktop you may actually want

Intel NUC 11 Extreme mini gaming desktop

Devindra Hardawar/Engadget

It's more practical than the last NUC Extreme, but it's still wildly expensive.

Who is a powerful miniature desktop for? That was the question running through my mind when I reviewed Intel's NUC 9 Extreme last year. It was the company's most powerful compact PC kit (NUC stands for "next unit of computing") at the time. But it was so wildly expensive — especially since you need to add your own RAM, storage, GPU and OS — it didn't make sense for anyone but mini-PC obsessives. The new NUC 11 Extreme, AKA "Beast Canyon," is pretty much the same story. But it's at least a bit cheaper and more flexible, thanks to its faster 11th-gen Intel CPU and support for full-sized GPUs.

Gallery: Intel NUC 11 Extreme | 17 Photos

I'll get this out of the way up front: Yes, this NUC is dramatically larger than any previous units we've seen. The 5-liter NUC 9 Extreme already seemed to be pushing the limits of a compact PC, but at 8 liters, the NUC 11 Extreme is what you'd call a Big Boy. Sure, it beats making space for a mid-tower PC on your desk, but it's still pretty substantial. You can't blame Intel too much: Gamers wanted full-sized GPUs in a NUC, this is just the most efficient way to make that happen. The big issue now is that Intel is directly competing with increasingly popular Mini-ITX PC cases, which are cheaper but typically more complex builds.

Pros

  • Useful modular design
  • Excellent case cooling
  • Thoughtful design to squeeze in full GPUs

Cons

  • Expensive
  • Kits require hardware installation

The NUC 11 Extreme screams "gamer" before you even turn it on. Its black metal case sports mesh air vents along the sides, giving you a peek at the GPU within and three large case fans up top. For a small box, it's clearly meant to push a lot of air. Hit the power button and it springs to life with an LED skull along the front panel, as well as underside LED lighting. I'm not one for too much gamer bling, but Intel's lighting comes is relatively subtle compared to many other PC makers.

Intel NUC 11 Extreme mini gaming desktop

Devindra Hardawar/Engadget

Our review unit featured Intel's 11th-gen i9 Compute Element, a modular card with an eight-core 11900KB CPU. It can also be purchased separately as an upgrade for NUC 9 Extreme customers. That was always the dream for Intel's NUC Extreme platform, which also includes Razer's Tomahawk mini-PC. Wouldn't it be nice if you could just yank a card out in a few years to get a new CPU? There are some compromises, though. According to Intel, there's no front panel audio support when using the new Compute Card on the NUC 9 Extreme, and there's no guaranteed PCIe 4.0 either. The company also says compatibility with other boxes depends on how the their NUC base board was designed. (We've reached out to Razer to see if the Tomahawk can be upgraded.)

To help speed up our review process, Intel sent along a unit pre-configured with Windows 10 Pro, 16GB of RAM, a speedy 512GB NVMe SSD, and an ASUS RTX 3060 GPU. Remember, you'll need to gather all of that gear too if you you a NUC kit for yourself (or just buy one pre-built from resellers like SimplyNUC).

While I've appreciated all of Intel's previous performance-oriented NUCs, including 2018's "Hades Canyon" model and 2016's "Skull Canyon," they've always been held back by their notebook processors. The NUC 11 Extreme, though, runs more powerful CPUs with a 65-watt TDP. That means it can tap into more power like a traditional desktop gaming chip. And based on our benchmarks, you can definitely see the benefits of that boost.

None

PCMark 10

3DMark (TimeSpy Extreme)

Geekbench 5

Intel NUC 11 Extreme (Intel Core i9-11900KB, NVIDIA RTX 3060)

7,167

4,143

1,684/9,345

Intel NUC 9 Extreme (Core i9-9980HK. NVIDIA RTX 2070)

6,469

4,057

1,312/7,464

ASUS ROG Strix G15 Advantage Edition (AMD Ryzen 9 5900HX, AMD Radeon RX 6800M)

6,992

5,189

1,457/7,691

ASUS Zephyrus G15 (AMD Ryzen 9 5900HS, NVIDIA RTX 3080 Max-Q)

6,881

4,530

1,426/7,267

In PCMark 10, the NUC easily outpaced every Windows PC we've seen this year. It was slightly faster than ASUS's ROG Strix G15, which was running AMD's powerful Ryzen 9 5900HX. Admittedly, we haven't looked at any gaming notebooks with 11th-gen Intel chips, but based on that AMD comparison I'd still expect the NUC 11 to come out ahead of those. We also haven't tested comparable 11th-gen desktop CPUs yet, but I'd wager they'll perform better since they can draw more power.

Apple's M1 iMac was the only computer we've reviewed that beat the NUC when it came to single-core performance in Geekbench 5, but Intel's machine still came out ahead in multithreading. The NUC 11 Extreme also impressed me when it came to transcoding a 4K video clip into 1080p. It managed to do that in 41 seconds, beating the speedy ROG Strix G15 by 6 seconds.

Intel NUC 11 Extreme mini gaming desktop

Devindra Hardawar/Engadget

I'm mainly focusing on CPU-bound benchmarks, because the NUC 11's graphics scores will ultimately depend on the GPU you plug into it. But I couldn't review a gaming PC without actually playing some games, could I? I'm happy to report that it reached 150 fps to 160 fps in Overwatch with epic graphics settings at my ultrawide monitor's native resolution (3,440 by 1,440 pixels). I was even able to get Control running in 1440p between 60 and 70 fps with medium ray tracing settings and graphics set to high. (Thanks to a healthy DLSS assist, of course.)

Basically, the NUC 11 Extreme does everything I expect it an RTX 3060-equipped gaming desktop to do. And despite the tight quarters, temperatures didn't suffer much either. The GPU never went above 75 celsius while gaming, and the CPU stayed under 80 celsius as well. The fans were noticeable under load, but they were never as whiny as the ones you'd find on some gaming laptops. (Larger fans can push more air without making as much noise, naturally.)

Devindra Hardawar/Engadget

This being the ultimate DIY PC kit, I also had to tear it open to see just how modular it actually was. The side panels came off easily enough, but I had to spend a few minutes prodding the NUC to make its top panel flip over. That revealed its innards, but I still had to lift up the rear panel to remove the screws securing the Compute Element, its plastic blower, and the GPU. It took around 10 more minutes to fully disassemble the system.

The entire process felt easier than on the NUC 9 Extreme, simply because there was more room to work with. But it's still not completely intuitive. I also accidentally tore apart the fan temperature sensors attached to the Compute Element, because a mere tug split them in half. If you've built PCs before, you should be able to intuit all of the cables and PCIe release levers you need to find. But I'd recommend taking some photos of all of the tiny wires connected to the Compute Element, because it's easy to mistake where they go and genuinely tough to plug them back in.

Intel NUC 11 Extreme mini gaming desktop

Devindra Hardawar/Engadget

The Compute Element card was similar to the one I held last year, except now there's a bigger fan and a beefier heatsink. Given the small workable space, I was also interested in seeing how more powerful GPUs would fit into the NUC 11. NVIDIA's massive RTX 3070 Ti and 3080 had no trouble fitting, and the Radeon RX 6800 dropped in just fine too. The bulkier RX 6800 XT was a no-go, unfortunately. Its heat sink was just a bit too large to fit in properly. Intel says the NUC 11 Extreme should fit GPUs up to 12 inches long, but be wary if you're planning to use anything with a bulky heatsink.

I'll admit, I was surprised that this NUC could actually fit some of the fastest graphics cards on the market. That makes it far more useful than the last model, which was limited to shorter 8-inch long GPUs. Now, you can have a NUC that could genuinely offer most of the speed you'd get with a full-sized desktop. Or maybe you just want a secondary computer to power your game streaming. Based on what I've seen, the NUC 11 Extreme can handle most anything.

But, it's still very expensive. Intel expects the Core i7 and i9 models to be priced between $1,150 and $1,350. (It's nixed plans for an i5 model.) You can also get the Compute Elements separately between $780 and $980 — a lot to pay for a card that's essential a cradle for CPUs that cost half the price. And, once again, you'll also have to shell out for all of the additional hardware and software you need for a Windows PC. All told, you can expect to pay at least another $1,000 if you want 16GB of RAM, 1TB of NVMe SSD storage and a decent GPU. 

Intel NUC 11 Extreme mini gaming desktop

Devindra Hardawar/Engadget

That may sound ridiculous, but keep in mind the Core i9 NUC 9 Extreme kit started at $1,639 last year. I couldn't fathom why anyone would pay out the nose for a compromised desktop that couldn't fit a full-sized GPU. But the NUC 11 Extreme fixes those issues, and it includes a far faster CPU. If all of this sounds too extreme, you can always consider Mini-ITX case builds, but once again be prepared for pricey hardware and even tighter working quarters. 

Intel's vision for a world where desktop computers can be both powerful and tiny is slowly coming into focus. Now, with the NUC 11 Extreme, Intel finally has a beefy miniature PC that I could actually recommend (assuming you've got deep pockets). 

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Popular on Engadget
Sours: https://www.engadget.com/intel-nuc-11-extreme-review-practical-tiny-gaming-desktop-pc-130041721.html
  1. Navisworks freedom 2015
  2. Used bass boats in va
  3. Husky home depot brand
  4. Splenda calories
  5. 2019 kawasaki kx85

Next Unit of Computing

Small form factor PC designed by Intel

Coffee Lake-U-based Bean CanyonIntel NUC (NUC8i5BEK2)
Motherboard of a 6th generation NUC (Model NUC6i3SYH), extended with two 8GB RAM modules

Next Unit of Computing (NUC) is a line of small-form-factorbarebone computer kits designed by Intel. It was previewed in 2012 and launched in early 2013.[1] The NUC has developed over ten generations, spanning from Sandy Bridge-based Celeron CPUs in the first generation through Ivy Bridge-based Core i3 and i5 CPUs in the second generation to Gemini Lake-based Pentium and Celeron CPUs and Kaby Lake-based Core i3, i5, and i7 CPUs in the seventh and eighth generations. The NUC motherboard usually measures approximately 4 × 4 inches (10.16 × 10.16 cm),[2] although some models have had different dimensions.[3]

The barebone kits consist of the board, in a plastic case with a fan, an external power supply, and a VESA mounting plate.[4] Intel does sell just the NUC motherboards, which have a built-in CPU, although (as of 2013[update]) the price of a NUC motherboard is very close to the corresponding cased kit; third-party cases for the NUC boards are also available.[5][6]

First generation[edit]

Sandy Bridge[edit]

The first generation Intel NUC launched in the first quarter of 2013.[1] This UCFFmotherboard and system kit are codenamed Ski Lake (DCP847SK) and Deep Canyon (DCCP847DY) respectively.

Second generation[edit]

Ivy Bridge[edit]

The base UCFF motherboard and kit without Thunderbolt or USB 3 are codenamed Golden Lake (D33217GK) and Ice Canyon (DC3217IY) respectively. The Thunderbolt capable UCFF motherboard and kit are codenamed Campers Lake (D33217CK) and Box Canyon (DC3217BY) respectively. The USB 3 capable UCFF motherboard and kit are codenamed Rend Lake (D53427RK) and Horse Canyon (DC53427HY) respectively.

The stripped-down DC3217BY model has a signature red top cover and no Ethernet. This model, while stocks were still available, generally sold for a deep discount. The absence of Ethernet may be mitigated by using a USB 2.0 to 10/100 fast Ethernet dongle based upon the Kawasaki LSI one-chip adapter (KL5KUSB102, for example), or a similar dongle based upon a Realtek chip; the Kawasaki Logic dongle requires a proprietary driver for macOS X, whereas the driver for the Realtek dongle is built into macOS X. The DC3217BY runs macOS X (10.9, and any of its updates) flawlessly as the processor's HD4000 is fully supported by macOS X.

Third generation[edit]

Bay Trail-M[edit]

This UCFF motherboard (DN2820FYB) and system kit (DN2820FYKH) model were codenamed Forest Canyon. The DN2820FYKH product itself is mis-marked DN2820FYK, but the retail package, all retail documentation, and Intel's web site correctly identify this product as DN2820FYKH. The "H" indicates support for internal 2.5" media, SSD or HDD. There is no "non-H" version of this product as it does not include an on-board mSATA connector, hence media which is external to the board is mandatory, and hence the "H" version.

This product introduces for the first time a new 12V 3A "wall wart", in place of the traditional 19V 3.42A power brick and its "Mickey Mouse" AC power cord. Four region-specific plug-on adapters, including North America and three overseas countries, are included in the retail package.

These models shipped with the problematic BIOS revision 13, however this revision did not recognise most low voltage SO-DIMMs and would report as having zero capacity. Keyboard escapes for BIOS interfacing had been problematic, legacy booting was not supported, and it had been elected to only include UEFI booting. BIOS revision 48 has been released and resolved the problems, enabling the recognition of most low voltage SO-DIMMs, keyboard escapes and legacy booting.

Bay Trail-I[edit]

This UCFF motherboard (DE3815TYB) and system kit (DE3815TYK) models were codenamed Thin Canyon.

Fourth generation[edit]

Haswell[edit]

Haswell-based Wilson CanyonIntel NUC, rear panel

UCFF motherboard (D34010WYB and D54250WYB) and system kit (D34010WYK/D34010WYKH and D54250WYK/D54250WYKH) models were designated Wilson Canyon[9][10] containing Haswell processors were revealed in June 2013.[11]

Fifth generation[edit]

Ambox current red Asia Australia.svg

This article needs to be updated. Please help update this section to reflect recent events or newly available information.(February 2020)

Broadwell-U[edit]

In early 2015 a new generation of NUCs, powered by 5th generation Intel processors was released and in Q2 2015 the first NUC with Core i7 processor (NUC5i7RYH) would become available.[13] The collection of 5th generation of NUCs include adaptive/smart performance technology[14] and Turbo Boost Technology 2.0.

UCFF motherboard (NUC5i3RYB, NUC5i5RYB and NUC5i7RYB) and system kit (NUC5i5RYK/NUC5i3RYH, NUC5i5RYK/NUC5i5RYH and NUC5i7RYH) models were designated Rock Canyon.[15] UCFF motherboard (NUC5i3MYBE and NUC5i5MYBE) and system kit (NUC5i3MYHE and NUC5i5MYHE) models were codenamed Maple Canyon.[16] In Q4 2018 and Q1 2019 two new SKUs of "Rock Canyon" - Refresh have been launched and become two of a few available models still supporting Windows* 7 (NUC5i3RYHSN and NUC5i5RYHS). These modes have updated CPU revisions and other minor changes. All models include:

  • Dual-channel DDR3L SO-DIMM, 1.35 V, 1333/1600 MHz, 16 GB maximum
  • One Gigabit Ethernet port
  • Internal support for M.2 (either B-Keyed Maple Canyon or M-Keyed Rock Canyon) 22×42, 22×60, and 22×80 SSD card supporting PCIe 2.0 (×1, ×2 and ×4) and SATA 6 Gbit/s[12]
  • Two USB 3.0 connectors on back panel
  • Two USB 3.0 connectors on front panel
  • Two internal USB 2.0 ports via header
  • Up to 7.1 surround audio via mini HDMI and mini DisplayPort
  • Headphone/microphone jack on the front panel

Braswell[edit]

These UCFF system kit (NUC5CPYH and NUC5PPYH) models, formerly known as Pinnacle Canyon, are based on 5th generation Celeron and Pentium-branded Braswell 14 nm processor family. There is also the UCFF complete system (NUC5PGYH) model, formerly known as Grass Canyon, which is based on 5th generation Pentium-branded Braswell 14 nm processor family and comes with 2 GB of RAM and 32 GB of eMMC with Windows 10 installed.

All models include:

  • One memory channel DDR3LSO-DIMM (204-pin), 1.35 V, 1333/1600 MHz, 8 GB maximum
  • One Gigabit Ethernet port
  • 802.11acWi-Fi (Intel Wireless-AC 3165) and Bluetooth 4.0
  • Internal support for M.2 (E-Keyed) 22×30 wireless card supporting PCIe 2.0 ×1, and USB 2.0
  • Two USB 3.0 connectors on back panel
  • Two USB 3.0 connectors on front panel
  • Two internal USB 2.0 ports via header
  • Up to 7.1 surround audio via HDMI
  • Headphone/microphone jack on the front panel
  • Headphone/TOSLINK jack on the rear panel
  • SDXC slot with UHS-I support on the side
  • CIR Sensor
  • According to the Intel Technical Product Specification, these models have fans.

Sixth generation[edit]

Skylake-based Swift CanyonIntel NUC (NUC6i3SYH)
Opened Skylake-based Swift CanyonIntel NUC (NUC6i3SYH)

Skylake-U[edit]

UCFF system kit (NUC6i3SYK/NUC6i3SYH and NUC6i5SYK/NUC6i5SYH) models were designated Swift Canyon, containing Skylake processors. UCFF system kit (NUC6i7KYK) models were codenamed Skull Canyon, containing Skylake processors. They were launched in Q4/2015, except for NUC6i7KYK, which was launched in Q2/2016.

All models include:[17]

  • Dual-channel DDR4 SO-DIMM, 1.2 V, 2133 MHz, 32 GB maximum
  • One Gigabit Ethernet port
  • Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8260 (802.11ac), 1×1, up to 867 Mbit/s
  • Dual-mode Bluetooth 4.1
  • Internal support for M.2 M-Keyed 22×42 and 22×80 SSD card supporting PCIe 3.0 (×1, ×2 and ×4) and SATA 6 Gbit/s
  • SDXC slot with UHS-I support on the side
  • Intel HD Graphics 540 video (580 for the NUC6i7KYK)
  • Up to 7.1 surround audio via full-sized HDMI and mini DisplayPort
  • Intel Wireless Display (Intel WiDi)

Skull Canyon models include:

Apollo Lake[edit]

These UCFF system kit (NUC6CAYS and NUC6CAYH) models formerly known as Arches Canyon, are based on the 6th generation Celeron-branded Apollo Lake SoC 14 nm processor family. The main difference between the two systems are that NUC6CAYS adds 32GB of eMMC storage. They were launched in Q4/2016.

  • RAM: DDR3L-1600/1866 1.35V SO-DIMM

Seventh generation[edit]

Kaby Lake-U (Baby Canyon)[edit]

Intel seventh generation NUC models, codenamed Baby Canyon, are based on their Kaby Lake-U processors. They were launched in Q1/2017 and Q2/2017.

ModelProcessorTDPGPUMax RAMDisplayExternal USB portsNetworkingInternal 2.5 SATAInternal M.2 slotsIntel Optane M.2 module
NUC7i7BNHi7-7567U28 WIris Plus 65032 GBHDMI 2.0a, Thunderbolt 3 via USB-CUSB 3.0 (×4), USB 3.1 Gen 2 (×1)Gigabit Ethernet (×1), 802.11ac, Bluetooth 4.2Yes (×1)Yes (×1)No
NUC7i7BNHX1i7-7567U28 WIris Plus 65032 GBHDMI 2.0a, Thunderbolt 3 via USB-CUSB 3.0 (×4), USB 3.1 Gen 2 (×1)Gigabit Ethernet (×1), 802.11ac, Bluetooth 4.2Yes (×1)Yes (×1)Yes (16 GB)
NUC7i5BNHi5-7260U15 WIris Plus 64032 GBHDMI 2.0a, Thunderbolt 3 via USB-CUSB 3.0 (×4), USB 3.1 Gen 2 (×1)Gigabit Ethernet (×1), 802.11ac, Bluetooth 4.2Yes (×1)Yes (×1)No
NUC7i5BNHX1i5-7260U15 WIris Plus 64032 GBHDMI 2.0a, Thunderbolt 3 via USB-CUSB 3.0 (×4), USB 3.1 Gen 2 (×1)Gigabit Ethernet (×1), 802.11ac, Bluetooth 4.2Yes (×1)Yes (×1)Yes (16 GB)
NUC7i5BNKi5-7260U15 WIris Plus 64032 GBHDMI 2.0a, Thunderbolt 3 via USB-CUSB 3.0 (×4), USB 3.1 Gen 2 (×1)Gigabit Ethernet (×1), 802.11ac, Bluetooth 4.2NoYes (×1)No
NUC7i3BNHi3-7100U15 WHD Graphics 62032 GBHDMI 2.0a, DP 1.2 via USB-CUSB 3.0 (×4), USB 3.1 Gen 2 (×1)Gigabit Ethernet (×1), 802.11ac, Bluetooth 4.2Yes (×1)Yes (×1)No
NUC7i3BNHX1i3-7100U15 WHD Graphics 62032 GBHDMI 2.0a, DP 1.2 via USB-CUSB 3.0 (×4), USB 3.1 Gen 2 (×1)Gigabit Ethernet (×1), 802.11ac, Bluetooth 4.2Yes (×1)Yes (×1)Yes (16 GB)
NUC7i3BNKi3-7100U15 WHD Graphics 62032 GBHDMI 2.0a, DP 1.2 via USB-CUSB 3.0 (×4), USB 3.1 Gen 2 (×1)Gigabit Ethernet (×1), 802.11ac, Bluetooth 4.2NoYes (×1)No

Kaby Lake-U (Dawson Canyon)[edit]

A refresh of the seventh generation NUC models, codenamed Dawson Canyon, saw a replacement of the USB 3.1 Type-C port with a second HDMI 2.0a port. This refresh also updated the CPU's in the i5 models while still using Kaby Lake-U processors, and the i7 models to Kaby Lake-R processors. The i3 models saw no change in the CPU. Intel Optane M.2 support remains, but no models with a preinstalled module were released. M.2 support was updated from a single 22×42/80 slot to dual 22×30 (key E) and 22×80 (key M) slots. They were launched in Q2/2017.

Kaby Lake-R (Dawson Canyon)[edit]

They were launched in Q1/2018.

Gemini Lake (June Canyon)[edit]

The UCFF system kit (NUC7PJYH and NUC7CJYH) models, codenamed June Canyon, based on 7th generation Pentium & Celeron-branded Gemini Lake SoC 14 nm processor family. They were launched in Q1/2018.

RAM: DDR4-2400 1.2V SO-DIMM

Eighth generation[edit]

Kaby Lake-G[edit]

Intel eighth generation NUC models, codenamed Hades Canyon, is based on their Kaby Lake-G processors with a TDP from 65 W to 100 W. It features a custom AMD GPU, based on Vega and Polaris technologies.[18] They were launched in Q1/2018.

Coffee Lake-U[edit]

Intel eighth generation NUC models, codenamed Bean Canyon, is based on their Coffee Lake-U processors with a TDP of 28 W.[19] They were launched in Q3/2018.

ModelProcessorTDPGPUMax RAMDisplayExternal USB portsNetworkingInternal 2.5 SATAInternal M.2 slotsIntel Optane M.2 module
NUC8i7BEHi7-8559U28 WIris Plus 65532 GBHDMI 2.0a, DP 1.2 via USB-C (Thunderbolt 3)USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-A (×4), USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-C (×1)Gigabit Ethernet (×1), 802.11ac, Bluetooth 5.0Yes (×1)Yes (×1)No
NUC8i5BEHi5-8259U28 WIris Plus 65532 GBHDMI 2.0a, DP 1.2 via USB-C (Thunderbolt 3)USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-A (×4), USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-C (×1)Gigabit Ethernet (×1), 802.11ac, Bluetooth 5.0Yes (×1)Yes (×1)No
NUC8i5BEKi5-8259U28 WIris Plus 65532 GBHDMI 2.0a, DP 1.2 via USB-C (Thunderbolt 3)USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-A (×4), USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-C (×1)Gigabit Ethernet (×1), 802.11ac, Bluetooth 5.0NoYes (×1)No
NUC8i3BEHi3-8109U28 WIris Plus 65532 GBHDMI 2.0a, DP 1.2 via USB-C (Thunderbolt 3)USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-A (×4), USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-C (×1)Gigabit Ethernet (×1), 802.11ac, Bluetooth 5.0Yes (×1)Yes (×1)No
NUC8i3BEKi3-8109U28 WIris Plus 65532 GBHDMI 2.0a, DP 1.2 via USB-C (Thunderbolt 3)USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-A (×4), USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-C (×1)Gigabit Ethernet (×1), 802.11ac, Bluetooth 5.0NoYes (×1)No

Cannon Lake-U[edit]

Intel eighth generation NUC models, codenamed Crimson Canyon, is based on their 10nm Cannon Lake-U processors. They come with Windows 10 Home x64 preinstalled along with a 1TB SATA3 HDD. They were launched in Q3/2018.

Whiskey Lake-U (Islay Canyon)[edit]

Intel eighth generation NUC models, codenamed Islay Canyon, is based on their Whiskey Lake-U processors with a TDP of 15 W.[19] They were launched in Q2/2019.

Whiskey Lake-U (Provo Canyon)[edit]

Intel eighth generation NUC models, codenamed Provo Canyon and marketed as NUC 8 Pro, is based on their Whiskey Lake-U processors with a TDP of 15 W and optional vPro.[20] They were launched in Q1/2020.

ModelProcessorTDPGPUMax RAMDisplayExternal USB portsNetworkingInternal 2.5 SATAInternal M.2 slots
NUC8i3PNHi3-8145U15 WIntel UHD Graphics 62064 GB DDR4-2400HDMI 2.0a, DP 1.2 via USB-C (Thunderbolt 3), eDP 1.4USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-A (×3), USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-C (×1)Gigabit Ethernet (×1), 802.11ac, Bluetooth 5.0Yes (×1)Yes (×2)
NUC8i3PNKi3-8145U15 W Intel UHD Graphics 620 64 GB DDR4-2400 HDMI 2.0a, DP 1.2 via USB-C (Thunderbolt 3), eDP 1.4 USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-A (×3), USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-C (×1) Gigabit Ethernet (×1), 802.11ac, Bluetooth 5.0NoYes (×2)
NUC8v5PNHi5-8365U15 W Intel UHD Graphics 620 64 GB DDR4-2400 HDMI 2.0a, DP 1.2 via USB-C (Thunderbolt 3), eDP 1.4 USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-A (×3), USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-C (×1) Gigabit Ethernet (×1), 802.11ac, Bluetooth 5.0Yes (×1)Yes (×2)
NUC8v5PNKi5-8365U15 W Intel UHD Graphics 620 64 GB DDR4-2400 HDMI 2.0a, DP 1.2 via USB-C (Thunderbolt 3), eDP 1.4 USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-A (×3), USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-C (×1) Gigabit Ethernet (×1), 802.11ac, Bluetooth 5.0NoYes (×2)
NUC8v7PNHi7-8665U15 W Intel UHD Graphics 620 64 GB DDR4-2400 HDMI 2.0a, DP 1.2 via USB-C (Thunderbolt 3), eDP 1.4 USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-A (×3), USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-C (×1) Gigabit Ethernet (×1), 802.11ac, Bluetooth 5.0Yes (×1)Yes (×2)
NUC8v7PNKi7-8665U15 W Intel UHD Graphics 620 64 GB DDR4-2400 HDMI 2.0a, DP 1.2 via USB-C (Thunderbolt 3), eDP 1.4 USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-A (×3), USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-C (×1) Gigabit Ethernet (×1), 802.11ac, Bluetooth 5.0NoYes (×2)

Apollo Lake[edit]

Intel eighth generation NUC models, codenamed Chaco Canyon, is based on their Apollo Lake processors with a TDP of 15 W, and 64 GB of eMMC. The 4GB of RAM are soldered directly to the motherboard and are therefore non-upgradeable. They were launched in Q3/2019.

Intel NUC 8 Rugged specifications, first fanless NUC since 2014, was released in September 2019.[21]

Ninth generation[edit]

Coffee Lake Refresh-H[edit]

Intel ninth generation NUC models, codenamed Ghost Canyon and marketed as NUC 9 Extreme, is based on their Coffee Lake Refresh-H processors with a TDP of 45 W.[22] They newly support an 8" desktop discrete graphic cards and a NUC compute element for CPU upgrades. They have a 5.0-liter case instead of the 0.67-liter case of most previous NUCs.[23] They were launched in Q1/2020.[24]

ModelProcessorTDPGPUMax RAMDisplayExternal USB portsNetworkingInternal SATAInternal M.2 slots
NUC9i5QNXi5-9300H45 WIntel UHD Graphics 63064 GB DDR4-2400HDMI 2.0a, Thunderbolt 3USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-A (×7), USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-C (×2), USB 2.0 (×2)Gigabit Ethernet (×2), 802.11ax, Bluetooth 5.0Yes (×1)Yes (×3)
NUC9i7QNXi7-9750H45 W Intel UHD Graphics 630 64 GB DDR4-2400 HDMI 2.0a, Thunderbolt 3USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-A (×7), USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-C (×2), USB 2.0 (×2) Gigabit Ethernet (×2), 802.11ax, Bluetooth 5.0Yes (×1)Yes (×3)
NUC9i9QNXi9-9980HK45 W Intel UHD Graphics 630 64 GB DDR4-2400 HDMI 2.0a, Thunderbolt 3USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-A (×7), USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-C (×2), USB 2.0 (×2) Gigabit Ethernet (×2), 802.11ax, Bluetooth 5.0Yes (×1)Yes (×3)

Xeon E-2200M / Coffee Lake Refresh-H[edit]

Intel ninth generation NUC models, codenamed Quartz Canyon and marketed as NUC 9 Pro, is based on their Xeon E-2200M and Coffee Lake Refresh-H processors with a TDP of 45 W.[25] They were launched in Q1/2020.[26]

ModelProcessorTDPGPUMax RAMDisplayExternal USB portsNetworkingInternal SATAInternal M.2 slots
NUC9V7QNXi7-9850H45 WIntel UHD Graphics 63064 GB DDR4-2400HDMI 2.0a, Thunderbolt 3USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-A (×7), USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-C (×2), USB 2.0 (×2)Gigabit Ethernet (×2), 802.11ax, Bluetooth 5.0Yes (×1)Yes (×3)
NUC9VXQNXXeon E-2286M45 W Intel UHD Graphics P630 64 GB DDR4-2400 HDMI 2.0a, Thunderbolt 3USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-A (×7), USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-C (×2), USB 2.0 (×2) Gigabit Ethernet (×2), 802.11ax, Bluetooth 5.0Yes (×1)Yes (×3)

Tenth generation[edit]

Comet Lake-U[edit]

Intel tenth generation NUC models, codenamed Frost Canyon and marketed as NUC 10 Performance, is based on their Comet Lake-U processors with a TDP of 25 W.[27] They were launched in November 2019.[28]

ModelBoardProcessorTDPGPUMax RAMDisplayExternal USB portsNetworkingInternal 2.5 SATAInternal M.2 slotsIntel Optane M.2 module
NUC10i3FNKNUC10i3FNB i3-10110U25 W Intel UHD Graphics 64 GB DDR4-2666 HDMI 2.0a, DP 1.2 via USB-C (Thunderbolt 3) USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-A (×3), USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-C (×2), USB 2.0 (×2) Gigabit Ethernet (×1), 802.11ax, Bluetooth 5.0No Yes (×1) No
NUC10i3FNKNNo Yes (×1) No
NUC10i3FNHYes (×1) Yes (×1) No
NUC10i3FNHNYes (×1) Yes (×1) No
NUC10i5FNKNUC10i5FNB i5-10210U25 W Intel UHD Graphics 64 GB DDR4-2666 HDMI 2.0a, DP 1.2 via USB-C (Thunderbolt 3) USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-A (×3), USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-C (×2), USB 2.0 (×2) Gigabit Ethernet (×1), 802.11ax, Bluetooth 5.0No Yes (×1) No
NUC10i5FNKNNo Yes (×1) No
NUC10i5FNHYes (×1) Yes (×1) No
NUC10i5FNHNYes (×1) Yes (×1) No
NUC10i7FNKNUC10i7FNB i7-10710U25 W Intel UHD Graphics 64 GB DDR4-2666 HDMI 2.0a, DP 1.2 via USB-C (Thunderbolt 3) USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-A (×3), USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-C (×2), USB 2.0 (×2) Gigabit Ethernet (×1), 802.11ax, Bluetooth 5.0No Yes (×1) No
NUC10i7FNKNNo Yes (×1) No
NUC10i7FNHYes (×1) Yes (×1) No
NUC10i7FNHNYes (×1) Yes (×1) No
ModelBoardProcessorTDPGPUIncluded MemoryDisplayExternal USB portsNetworkingInternal 2.5 SATAIncluded StorageIntel Optane M.2 module
NUC10i3FNHFNUC10i3FNB i3-10110U25 W Intel UHD Graphics 4 GB DDR4-2666 HDMI 2.0a, DP 1.2 via USB-C (Thunderbolt 3) USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-A (×3), USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-C (×2), USB 2.0 (×2) Gigabit Ethernet (×1), 802.11ax, Bluetooth 5.01 TB HDD Yes (×1) Yes (16 GB)
NUC10i3FNHFA4 GB DDR4-2666 1 TB HDD Yes (×1) Yes (16 GB)
NUC10i3FNHJA2×4 GB DDR4-2666 1 TB HDD Yes (×1) Yes (16 GB)
NUC10i5FNKPNUC10i5FNB i5-10210U25 W Intel UHD Graphics 2×4 GB DDR4-2666 HDMI 2.0a, DP 1.2 via USB-C (Thunderbolt 3) USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-A (×3), USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-C (×2), USB 2.0 (×2) Gigabit Ethernet (×1), 802.11ax, Bluetooth 5.0No 256 GB NVMe SSD No
NUC10i5FNKPA2×4 GB DDR4-2666 No 256 GB NVMe SSD No
NUC10i5FNHCA2×4 GB DDR4-2666 1 TB HDD 256 GB NVMe SSD No
NUC10i5FNHF4 GB DDR4-2666 1 TB HDD Yes (×1) Yes (16 GB)
NUC10i5FNHJ2×4 GB DDR4-2666 1 TB HDD Yes (×1) Yes (16 GB)
NUC10i5FNHJA2×4 GB DDR4-2666 1 TB HDD Yes (×1) Yes (16 GB)
NUC10i7FNKPNUC10i7FNB i7-10710U25 W Intel UHD Graphics 2×4 GB DDR4-2666 HDMI 2.0a, DP 1.2 via USB-C (Thunderbolt 3) USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-A (×3), USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-C (×2), USB 2.0 (×2) Gigabit Ethernet (×1), 802.11ax, Bluetooth 5.0No 256 GB NVMe SSD No
NUC10i7FNKPA2×4 GB DDR4-2666 No 256 GB NVMe SSD No
NUC10i7FNHC2×4 GB DDR4-2666 1 TB HDD 256 GB NVMe SSD No
NUC10i7FNHAA2×8 GB DDR4-2666 1 TB HDD 256 GB NVMe SSD No
NUC10i7FNHJA2×4 GB DDR4-2666 1 TB HDD Yes (×1) Yes (16 GB)

Eleventh generation[edit]

Tiger Lake-U[edit]

Intel eleventh generation NUC models, codenamed Phantom Canyon and marketed as NUC 11 Enthusiast, is based on their Tiger Lake-U processors with a TDP from 150 W.[29] It features an Nvidia GeForce RTX 2060 discrete GPU. They were launched on January 13, 2021.[30]

Intel eleventh generation NUC models, codenamed Panther Canyon and marketed as NUC 11 Performance, is based on their Tiger Lake-U processors with a TDP of 40 W.[31] They were launched on January 13, 2021.[32]

ModelBoardProcessorTDPGPUMax RAMDisplayExternal USB portsNetworkingInternal M.2 slotsInternal 2.5 SATA
NUC11PAKi3NUC11PABi3 i3-1115G440 W Intel UHD Graphics 64 GB DDR4‑3200
via 2×32 GB PC4‑25600 SO‑DIMMs
HDMI 2.0a, 2x DP 1.4 via USB-C (Thunderbolt 3), MiniDP 1.4 3×USB 3.1 Gen 2 (Type-A), 2×USB 3.1 Gen 2 (Type-C) 1×2.5 Gigabit Ethernet, 802.11ax, Bluetooth 5.0Yes (×1) No
NUC11PAHi3Yes (×1) Yes (×1)
NUC11PAKi5NUC11PABi5 i5-1135G740 W Iris Xe (80 EU) 64 GB DDR4‑3200
via 2×32 GB PC4‑25600 SO‑DIMMs
HDMI 2.0a, 2x DP 1.4 via USB-C (Thunderbolt 3), MiniDP 1.4 3×USB 3.1 Gen 2 (Type-A), 2×USB 3.1 Gen 2 (Type-C) 1×2.5 Gigabit Ethernet, 802.11ax, Bluetooth 5.0Yes (×1) No
NUC11PAHi5Yes (×1) Yes (×1)
NUC11PAKi7NUC11PABi5 i7-1165G740 W Iris Xe (96 EU) 64 GB DDR4‑3200
via 2×32 GB PC4‑25600 SO‑DIMMs
HDMI 2.0a, 2x DP 1.4 via USB-C (Thunderbolt 3), MiniDP 1.4 3×USB 3.1 Gen 2 (Type-A), 2×USB 3.1 Gen 2 (Type-C) 1×2.5 Gigabit Ethernet, 802.11ax, Bluetooth 5.0Yes (×1) No
NUC11PAHi7Yes (×1) Yes (×1)
ModelBoardProcessorTDPGPUIncluded MemoryDisplayExternal USB portsNetworkingIncluded StorageInternal 2.5 SATA
NUC11PAQi50WANUC11PABi5 i5-1135G740 W Iris Xe (80 EU) 8 GB DDR4‑3200
via 2×4 GB PC4‑25600 SO‑DIMMs
HDMI 2.0a, 2x DP 1.4 via USB-C (Thunderbolt 3), MiniDP 1.4 3×USB 3.1 Gen 2 (Type-A), 2×USB 3.1 Gen 2 (Type-C) 1×2.5 Gigabit Ethernet, 802.11ax, Bluetooth 5.0500 GB Yes (×1)
NUC11PAQi70QANUC11PABi5 i7-1165G740 W Iris Xe (96 EU) 16 GB DDR4‑3200
via 2×8 GB PC4‑25600 SO‑DIMMs
HDMI 2.0a, 2x DP 1.4 via USB-C (Thunderbolt 3), MiniDP 1.4 3×USB 3.1 Gen 2 (Type-A), 2×USB 3.1 Gen 2 (Type-C) 1×2.5 Gigabit Ethernet, 802.11ax, Bluetooth 5.0500 GB Yes (×1)

Intel eleventh generation NUC models, codenamed Tiger Canyon and marketed as NUC 11 Pro, is based on their Tiger Lake-U processors with a TDP of 15 or 28 W. They were launched on first quarter 2021.

ModelBoardProcessorTDPGPUMax RAMDisplayExternal USB portsNetworkingInternal M.2 slotsInternal 2.5 SATA
NUC11TNKi3NUC11TNBi3i3-1115G415 W Intel UHD Graphics 64 GB DDR4‑3200
via 2×32 GB PC4‑25600 SO‑DIMMs
2xHDMI 2.0b, 2xDP 1.4a via USB-C (w/Thunderbolt 3,Thunderbolt 4) 1×USB 2.0 (Type-A), 3×USB 3.2 (Type-A), 2×USB 4 (Type-C) 1×2.5 Gigabit Ethernet, 802.11ax, Bluetooth 5.2Yes (×1) No
NUC11TNHi3Yes (×1) Yes (×1)
NUC11TNHi30L3×USB 2.0 (Type-A), 3×USB 3.2 (Type-A), 2×USB 4 (Type-C) 2×2.5 Gigabit Ethernet, 802.11ax, Bluetooth 5.2Yes (×1) Yes (×1)
NUC11TNKi5NUC11TNBi5i5-1135G728 W Iris Xe (80 EU) 64 GB DDR4‑3200
via 2×32 GB PC4‑25600 SO‑DIMMs
2xHDMI 2.0b, 2xDP 1.4a via USB-C (w/Thunderbolt 3,Thunderbolt 4) 1×USB 2.0 (Type-A), 3×USB 3.2 (Type-A), 2×USB 4 (Type-C) 1×2.5 Gigabit Ethernet, 802.11ax, Bluetooth 5.2Yes (×1) No
NUC11TNHi5Yes (×1) Yes (×1)
NUC11TNHi50L3×USB 2.0 (Type-A), 3×USB 3.2 (Type-A), 2×USB 4 (Type-C) 2×2.5 Gigabit Ethernet, 802.11ax, Bluetooth 5.2Yes (×1) Yes (×1)
NUC11TNKv5NUC11TNBv5i5-1145G728 W Iris Xe (80 EU) 64 GB DDR4‑3200
via 2×32 GB PC4‑25600 SO‑DIMMs
2xHDMI 2.0b, 2xDP 1.4a via USB-C (w/Thunderbolt 3,Thunderbolt 4) 1×USB 2.0 (Type-A), 3×USB 3.2 (Type-A), 2×USB 4 (Type-C) 1×2.5 Gigabit Ethernet, 802.11ax, Bluetooth 5.2Yes (×1) No
NUC11TNHv5Yes (×1) Yes (×1)
NUC11TNHv50L3×USB 2.0 (Type-A), 3×USB 3.2 (Type-A), 2×USB 4 (Type-C) 2×2.5 Gigabit Ethernet, 802.11ax, Bluetooth 5.2Yes (×1) Yes (×1)
NUC11TNKi7NUC11TNBi7i7-1165G728 W Iris Xe (96 EU) 64 GB DDR4‑3200
via 2×32 GB PC4‑25600 SO‑DIMMs
2xHDMI 2.0b, 2xDP 1.4a via USB-C (w/Thunderbolt 3,Thunderbolt 4) 1×USB 2.0 (Type-A), 3×USB 3.2 (Type-A), 2×USB 4 (Type-C) 1×2.5 Gigabit Ethernet, 802.11ax, Bluetooth 5.2Yes (×1) No
NUC11TNHi7Yes (×1) Yes (×1)
NUC11TNHi70L3×USB 2.0 (Type-A), 3×USB 3.2 (Type-A), 2×USB 4 (Type-C) 2×2.5 Gigabit Ethernet, 802.11ax, Bluetooth 5.2Yes (×1) Yes (×1)
NUC11TNKv7NUC11TNBv7i7-1185G728 W Iris Xe (96 EU) 64 GB DDR4‑3200
via 2×32 GB PC4‑25600 SO‑DIMMs
2xHDMI 2.0b, 2xDP 1.4a via USB-C (w/Thunderbolt 3,Thunderbolt 4) 1×USB 2.0 (Type-A), 3×USB 3.2 (Type-A), 2×USB 4 (Type-C) 1×2.5 Gigabit Ethernet, 802.11ax, Bluetooth 5.2Yes (×1) No
NUC11TNHv7Yes (×1) Yes (×1)
NUC11TNHv70L3×USB 2.0 (Type-A), 3×USB 3.2 (Type-A), 2×USB 4 (Type-C) 2×2.5 Gigabit Ethernet, 802.11ax, Bluetooth 5.2Yes (×1) Yes (×1)

Reception and ecosystem[edit]

The NUC was seen by some reviewers as Intel's response to (or adoption of) the Apple Mac Mini format,[33] although it is actually smaller, physically.[34][35] Given its kit nature, other reviewers have seen it as a more powerful Raspberry Pi,[36] particularly since the NUC boards could be bought without a case.[37] The NUC can also be seen as an extension or continuation of Intel's earlier mobile-on-desktop (MoDT) initiative that was spearheaded by AOpen as early as 2004.[38][39][40]

Most of the third-generation NUCs come in two case sizes, one with room for a 2.5-inch drive, and one without. The smaller case, although lacking room for a 2.5" drive, still has an internal SATA connector (including SATA power).[33][41][42][43] Some larger third-party cases have appeared that can fit such drives.[6]

The Intel case is actively cooled with a fan. Silent PC Review notes that “The original Intel NUC had "the distinction of being the quietest fan-cooled mini-computer we've come across." The NUC D54250WYK [Haswell-based], with the same cooling system, sounds exactly the same. In normal use, you can't hear the fan until your ear is inches from the unit.”[44] Nevertheless, passively cooled third-party cases have appeared on the market as well.[5] Larger or metallic third-party cases provide lower operating temperatures as well.[45]

A review by the Tech Report of the pre-production 2012-vintage NUC found that the NUC would seize up after a few gigabytes were transferred over wireless and that the problem could be alleviated by better cooling of the NUC case. Intel later increased the default fan speed for production machines through a BIOS update (downloadable from Intel's web site for "early adopters").[46]

Regarding power consumption, in their review of the D54250WYK with a Haswell i5-4250, Silent PC Review concluded that "An idle power level of just 6 W and typical use power barely into two digits is very impressive in one sense; in another sense, it's what you find in current Ultrabooks using similar components."[47]

Other companies have subsequently adopted a form factor similar, but not identical, to Intel's NUC. For example, Gigabyte Technology launched their BRIX series, which attempts to differentiate itself using more powerful components, up to the i7-4770R processor, which embeds Intel Iris Pro Graphics.[48]

Operating system support[edit]

NUCs support UEFI compatible operating systems, such as Microsoft Windows, as well as most distributions of Linux. Additionally, they can be used for virtualization with VMwarevSphere; multiple NUCs can be used together to create a home lab for learning purposes.[49]

It is technically possible, with some limitations in functionality, to install an unauthorized copy of MacOS on a NUC, creating a "Hackintosh". The pre-Haswell Core i3 and Core i5 NUCs will run OS X 10.9 Mavericks well.[citation needed]

Skylake and Broadwell-based NUC is also a supported device in Google Fuchsia OS.[50]

References[edit]

  1. ^ ab"Intel® NUC Kit DCCP847DYE Product Specifications". ark.intel.com. Retrieved 2020-12-07.
  2. ^Halfacree, G (March 2013). "Intel's Next Unit of Computing". Custom PC. Dennis Publishing (116): 14–15.
  3. ^"Intel® NUC Board NUC8CCHB Product Specifications". n.d. Retrieved 2020-03-01.
  4. ^Intel NUC product specifications "Intel NUC", accessed 2013-06-10.
  5. ^ ab"Tranquil PC launches a fanless case for Intel's NUC | Chips". Geek.com. 2013-01-29. Archived from the original on 2016-02-22. Retrieved 2014-01-12.
  6. ^ ab"Akasa Rolls Out Tesla H NUC Case". techPowerUp. 2013-12-09. Retrieved 2014-01-12.
  7. ^One or two PC3-10600 (1333 MHz) or PC3-12800 (1600 MHz) SO-DIMMs, 1.5 volts, or PC3L SO-DIMMs, 1.35 volts.
  8. ^Fast (10/100) Ethernet is possible using a Kawasaki LSI USB 2.0 dongle (the vendor provides drivers for all common OSes, including macOS X); or a Realtek dongle (which has support built into macOS X itself).
  9. ^Intel’s Haswell “Wilson Canyon” NUC smiles for the cameras
  10. ^Intel NUC Kit D54250WYK Review – The NUC Gets Haswell Power!
  11. ^Tom's Hardware Guide, "3rd Generation of Intel NUC Boards Shown at Computex, 2013-06-07, accessed 2013-06-10.
  12. ^ abcdeInternal power and data headers are provided for connection to external 2.5" media, with the bottom cover removed; female to female is required.
  13. ^"Intel NUC Products". Retrieved 9 March 2015.
  14. ^"Intel Core i5 NUCs". Retrieved 9 March 2015.
  15. ^"Products (Formerly Rock Canyon)".
  16. ^"Products (Formerly Maple Canyon)".
  17. ^"Intel® NUC Kits: NUC6i5SYH and NUC6i5SYK Product Brief". Intel. Retrieved 2015-12-24.
  18. ^https://www.pcworld.com/article/3267169/computers/intel-kaby-lake-g-with-radeon-vega-m-may-be-more-polaris-than-vega.html
  19. ^ abhttps://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/products/boards-kits/nuc/kits.html
  20. ^https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/codename/199124.html
  21. ^https://www.techrepublic.com/article/intel-officially-unveils-chaco-canyon-first-fanless-nuc-in-five-years/
  22. ^https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/codename/189255.html
  23. ^https://www.anandtech.com/show/15313/intel-at-ces-2020-45w-10th-gen-mobile-cpus-soon-tiger-lake-with-xe-graphics-later
  24. ^https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/products/docs/boards-kits/nuc/nuc9-extreme.html
  25. ^https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/codename/190099.html
  26. ^https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/products/docs/boards-kits/nuc/nuc9-pro.html
  27. ^https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/codename/189251.html
  28. ^https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/products/docs/boards-kits/nuc/nuc10-performance-kits-mini-pcs-brief.html
  29. ^https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/codename/189256.html
  30. ^https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/products/docs/boards-kits/nuc/nuc-11-enthusiast-mini-pc-kit-brief.html
  31. ^https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/codename/198283.html
  32. ^https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/products/docs/boards-kits/nuc/mini-pcs/nuc-11-performance-mini-pc-kits-brief.html
  33. ^ ab"Intel NUC Kit D54250WYK: Review" (in French). Digitalversus.com. 2013-12-06. Retrieved 2014-01-12.
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Next_Unit_of_Computing
KUPAS TUNTAS MINI PC BADAK DARI INTEL TAPI APAKAH WORTH IT? I INTEL NUC 11 PHK i7 aka PHANTOM CANYON

.

Nuke intel

.

A TRULY unexpected W…- Intel 11th Gen Phantom Canyon NUC Review

.

Similar news:

.



1248 1249 1250 1251 1252