Bach trombone

Bach trombone DEFAULT

Vincent Bach Omega Tenor Trombone w/ F Attachment

Article number:TB200BU
Availability:In stock

The Vincent Bach TB200 is an ideal horn for an advancing student or a pro looking for the addition of an F attachment but still wants a smaller bore instrument.

Vincent Bach combined his unique talents as both a musician and an engineer to create brass instruments of unequalled tonal quality. Often copied but never duplicated, Bach instruments today remain the sound choice of artists worldwide.

Features

The Bach TB200 is a .525" medium-large bore tenor trombone made with an 8" two-piece hand-hammered yellow brass bell finished off with a soldered bell wire making it extremely responsive with a colorful and broad sound. The chrome plated nickel silver inner handslide tubes provide the ideal surface for smooth and quick handslide action. The clear lacquer finish provides a subtle warmth to the overall sound.

The valve and slide both move very well and this instrument has already been cleaned and adjusted by our in-house Brass repair techs. Grab the next step in your development by the slide and reach the playing goals you've always dreamed of.

Sours: https://www.virtuosityboston.com/vincent-bach-omega-tenor-trombone-w-f-attachment.html

Student

Intermediate

Professional

The Bach BTB411 trombone is an intermidiate level instrument combining unique specifications and acoustic guidelines designed to develop and enhance the demanding skillsets required of today's young players. Vincent Bach fused his dual talent as an accomplished musician and meticulous engineer to create brass instruments of unparalleled tonal quality. Often copied but never duplicated, Bach instruments remain the sound choice of students and artists worldwide.



FEATURES

The BTB411 is a well-designed and durable instrument perfect for students and amateur musicians in a variety of musical styles. This step-up instrument is an ideal choice for players seeking the characteristics of a professional large bore F attachment trombone. Starting with the Bach Stradivarius threaded (removable) leadpipe,fit for a large shank mouthpiece, the model utilizes professional features at a more affordable price point. Made with an 8-1/2" two-piece yellow brass bell and finished off with a soldered bead, this the BTB411 delivers extremely responsive projection with a colorful and broad sound. The open wrap F section promotes stability in the high range and supplies easy response in the valve register. The yellow brass .547" bore handslide is paired with a rounded nickel crook creates brilliant articulation with a full-centered sound. Chrome plated nickel silver inner handslide tubes provide the ideal surface for smooth and quick handslide action and the clear lacquer finish provides a subtle warmth to the overall sound.

  • Large bore intermediate model with an open wrap F-attachment
  • Bach Stradivarius threaded (removable) leadpipe for a large shank mouthpiece
  • Yellow brass outer handslide tubes paired with a nickel silver slide crook provide brilliant articulation with a full-centered sound
  • Yellow brass bell adds fullness and warmth to the sound
  • Case has a protective nylon covering, zippered accessory pouch, and backpack straps

SPECIFICATIONS

  • .547" bore
  • Key of Bb/F
  • 8-1/2" yellow brass bell
  • Open wrap F attachment with standard rotor
  • Yellow brass outer handslide tubes and nickel crook
  • Chrome plated nickel silver inner handslide tubes
  • Clear lacquer finish
  • Bach 6-1/2AL mouthpiece
  • Lightweight and durable backpack style case

* Also available in a silver-plated finish as model BTB411S


QUALITY ASSURANCE

At Conn-Selmer, we are committed to ensuring every brass instrument is ready to play right out of the box. To obtain this objective, we have developed and implemented a best-in-class play test criteria and improved our drop testing standards to increase durability. Rest assured, every brass instrument is professionally set up at the Conn-Selmer Brass Quality Center in Elkhart, IN, in optimal playing condition the moment you open the case, and ready to last a lifetime.


Bach LogoSours: https://www.conn-selmer.com/en-us/instruments/band-instruments/trombones/btb411
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Woodwind Instrumentation Codes

Following many of the titles in our Wind Ensemble catalog, you will see a set of numbers enclosed in square brackets, as in this example:

DescriptionPrice
Rimsky-Korsakov
Quintet in Bb [1011-1 w/piano]
Item: 26746
$28.75

The bracketed numbers tell you the precise instrumentation of the ensemble. The first number stands for Flute, the second for Oboe, the third for Clarinet, the fourth for Bassoon, and the fifth (separated from the woodwinds by a dash) is for Horn. Any additional instruments (Piano in this example) are indicated by "w/" (meaning "with") or by using a plus sign.

Flute   Oboe   Clarinet   Bassoon   —   Horn

This woodwind quartet is for 1 Flute, no Oboe, 1 Clarinet, 1 Bassoon, 1 Horn and Piano.

Sometimes there are instruments in the ensemble other than those shown above. These are linked to their respective principal instruments with either a "d" if the same player doubles the instrument, or a "+" if an extra player is required. Whenever this occurs, we will separate the first four digits with commas for clarity. Thus a double reed quartet of 2 oboes, english horn and bassoon will look like this:

0,2+1,0,1-0

Note the "2+1" portion means "2 oboes plus english horn"

Titles with no bracketed numbers are assumed to use "Standard Instrumentation." The following is considered to be Standard Instrumentation:

  • Duo - Flute & Clarinet - or [1010-0]
  • Trio - Flute, Oboe & Clarinet - or [1110-0]
  • Quartet - Flute, Oboe, Clarinet & Bassoon - or [1111-0]
  • Quintet - Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon & Horn - [or 1111-1]

Brass Instrumentation Codes

Following many of the titles in our Brass Ensemble catalog, you will see a set of five numbers enclosed in square brackets, as in this example:

DescriptionPrice
Copland
Fanfare for the Common Man [343.01 w/tympani]
Item: 02158
$14.95

The bracketed numbers tell you how many of each instrument are in the ensemble. The first number stands for Trumpet, the second for Horn, the third for Trombone, the fourth (separated from the first three by a dot) for Euphonium and the fifth for Tuba. Any additional instruments (Tympani in this example) are indicated by a "w/" (meaning "with") or by using a plus sign.

Trumpet     Horn     Trombone   .   Euphonium     Tuba

Thus, the Copland Fanfare shown above is for 3 Trumpets, 4 Horns, 3 Trombones, no Euphonium, 1 Tuba and Tympani. There is no separate number for Bass Trombone, but it can generally be assumed that if there are multiple Trombone parts, the lowest part can/should be performed on Bass Trombone.

Titles listed in our catalog without bracketed numbers are assumed to use "Standard Instrumentation." The following is considered to be Standard Instrumentation:

  • Brass Duo - Trumpet & Trombone, or [101.00]
  • Brass Trio - Trumpet, Horn & Trombone, or [111.00]
  • Brass Quartet - 2 Trumpets, Horn & Trombone, or [211.00]
  • Brass Quintet - 2 Trumpets, Horn, Trombone & Tuba, or [211.01]
  • Brass Sextet and greater - No Standard Instrumentaion
People often ask us about "PJBE" or "Philip Jones" instrumentation. This is a special instrumentation adopted and perfected by the Philip Jones Brass Ensemble. It consists of the forces 414.01, and often includes Percussion and/or Tympani. In addition, there are often doublings in the Trumpet section - Piccolo and Flugelhorn being the most common. While this instrumentation has come to be common, it is still not "Standard" as many Brass Dectets use very different forces, most often with more Horns than PJBE.

String Instrumentation Codes

Following many of the titles in our String Ensemble catalog, you will see a set of four numbers enclosed in square brackets, as in this example:

DescriptionPrice
Atwell
Vance's Dance [0220]
Item: 32599
$8.95

These numbers tell you how many of each instrument are in the ensemble. The first number stands for Violin, the second for Viola, the third for Cello, and the fourth for Double Bass. Thus, this string quartet is for 2 Violas and 2 Cellos, rather than the usual 2110. Titles with no bracketed numbers are assumed to use "Standard Instrumentation." The following is considered to be Standard Instrumentation:

  • String Duo - Viola & Viola - [1100]
  • String Trio - Violin, Viola, Cello - [1110]
  • String Quartet - 2 Violins, Viola, Cello - [2110]
  • String Quintet - 2 Violins, Viola, Cello, Bass - [2111]

Orchestra & Band Instrumentation Codes

Following some titles in our Orchestra & Band catalogs, you will see a numeric code enclosed in square brackets, as in these examples:

 Order QtyDescriptionPrice
Beethoven
Symphony No 1 in C, op 21
[2,2,2,2-2,2,0,0, tymp, 44322]
$150.00
Jones
Wind Band Overture
[2+1,1,3+ac+bc,2,SATB-2+2,4,3+1,1, tymp, percussion, double bass]
$85.00
MacKenzie
Hines Pond Fantasy (DePaolo)
[2d1+1,1,2+1,1-2,2(+2),3,0, perc, tymp, 44322, Eb clarinet, SAATB saxes, trombone solo]
$75.00

The bracketed numbers tell you the precise instrumentation of the ensemble. The system used above is standard in the orchestra music field. The first set of numbers (before the dash) represent the Woodwinds. The set of numbers after the dash represent the Brass. Percussion is abbreviated following the brass. Strings are represented with a series of five digits representing the quantity of each part (first violin, second violin, viola, cello, bass). Other Required and Solo parts follow the strings:

Woodwinds—Brass,   Percussion,   Strings,   Other

Principal auxilary instruments (piccolo, english horn, bass clarinet, contrabassoon, wagner tuba, cornet & euphonium) are linked to their respective instruments with either a "d" if the same player doubles the auxiliary instrument, or a "+" if an extra player is required. Instruments shown in parenthesis are optional and may be omitted.

Example 1 - Beethoven:

[2,2,2,2-2,2,0,0, tymp, 44322]

The Beethoven example is typical of much Classical and early Romantic fare. In this case, the winds are all doubled (2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets and 2 bassoons), and there are two each horns and trumpets. There is no low brass. There is tympani. Strings are a standard 44322 configuration (4 first violin, 4 second violin, 3 viola, 2 cello, 2 bass). Sometimes strings are simply listed as "str," which means 44322 strings.

Example 2 - Jones: (concert band/wind ensemble example)

[2+1,1,3+ac+bc,2,SAATB-2+2,4,3+1,1, tymp, percussion, double bass]

The second example is common for a concert band or wind ensemble piece. This ficticious work is for 2 flutes (plus piccolo), 1 oboe, 3 clarinets plus alto and bass clarinets, 2 bassoons, 5 saxes (soprano, 2 altos, tenor & bari), 2 trumpets (plus 2 cornets), 3 trombones, euphonium, tuba, tympani, percussion and double bass. Note the inclusion of the saxes after bassoon for this band work. Note also that the separate euphonium part is attached to trombone with a plus sign. For orchestral music, saxes are at the end (see Saxophones below. It is highly typical of band sets to have multiple copies of parts, especially flute, clarinet, sax, trumpet, trombone & percussion. Multiples, if any, are not shown in this system. The numbers represent only distinct parts, not the number of copies of a part.

Example 3 - MacKenzie: (a fictional work, by the way).

[2d1+1,1,2+1,1-2,2(+2),3,0, perc, tymp, 66432, Eb clarinet, SAATB saxes, trombone solo]

In the third example, we have a rather extreme use of the system. It is an orchestral work for piccolo, 2 flutes (1 of whom doubles on piccolo), 1 oboe, 2 clarinets plus an additional bass clarinet, 1 bassoon, 2 horns, 2 trumpets (plus an optional 2 cornets), 3 trombones, no tuba, percussion, tympani, 6 first violins, 6 second violins, 4 violas, 3 cellos, 2 double basses, Eb clarinet (as an additional chair, not doubled), 5 saxes (soprano, 2 alto, tenor & baritone) & a trombone soloist.

Note: This system lists Horn before Trumpet. This is standard orchestral nomenclature. Unless otherwise noted, we will use this system for both orchestra and band works (in most band scores, Trumpet precedes Horn, and sometimes Oboe & Bassoon follow Clarinet). Also, it should be noted that Euphonium can be doubled by either Trombone or Tuba. Typically, orchestra scores have the tuba linked to euphonium, but it does happen where Trombone is the principal instead.

Saxophones, when included in orchestral music (they rarely are) will be shown in the "other instrument" location after strings and before the soloist, if any. However for band music, they are commonly present and therefore will be indicated after bassoon as something similar to "SAATB" where S=soprano, A=alto, T=tenor and B=baritone. Letters that are duplicated (as in A in this example) indicate multiple parts.

And finally, here is one more way to visualize the above code sequence:

  • Flute (doubles or with additional Piccolo)
  • Oboe (doubles or with additional English Horn)
  • Clarinet (doubles or with additional Bass Clarinet)
  • Bassoon (doubles or with additional Contrabassoon)
  • Saxophones (band music only, showing SATB voicing)
  • - (dash)
  • Horn (doubles or with additional Wagner Tuba)
  • Trumpet (doubles or with additional Cornet)
  • Trombone (doubles or with additional Euphonium)
  • Tuba (doubles or with additional Euphonium)
  • Percussion
  • Tympani
  • Strings (1st & 2nd Violin, Viola, Cello, Bass)
  • Other Required Parts
  • Soloist(s)
Sours: https://www.hickeys.com/music/brass/trombone/trombones/bach_altos_and_tenors.php
Passacaglia in C Minor, J.S. Bach arranged for trombone octet by Hunsberger
Crazy4Tbone86 wrote: ↑

Mon Aug 03, 2020 11:59 pm

I have had this conversation about different vintages of Bach trombones with Todd Clontz (Baltimore area) many times. He has rebuilt hundreds of Bach trombones and is one of the people who inspired me to start learning the tech trade.

Todd believes that one of the best vintages for Bach trombones started in the late 1980s and continued for almost 8 or 9 years. His theory is that the Bach factory used high quality sheet brass from a particular supplier at that time. I believe that metal supplier was from Altoona, PA, but could be mistaken.

There were many times in which Todd would play two of the same model Bach horns without telling me what he was playing. He would always want my feedback and comparison of "horn A versus horn B" (blind test). Almost every time, the horn that won the blind test was an early 1990s vintage. At one point or another the early 1990s horns beat some of the most revered vintages of Bach.....New York, Mt. Vernon, 1970s Corporation and even the modern Artisan models.

I'm not going to make a blanket statement that 1990s Bach trombones are the best ever. I do want to say that there where many fantastic horns made in that era......especially to anyone who believes it was bad period for Bach. After all, I own a few Bachs from that era and those horns are fabulous!
Sours: https://trombonechat.com/viewtopic.php?t=16116

Trombone bach

Bach LT6 Trombone  played by Norlan Bewley

Bach LT6 Trombone  Review

Reviews - Bach Stradivarius Trombones
Bach LT6 Trombone
Bach LT8G Trombone

There is just something about the tone of Bach trombones that I love. Perhaps it’s in their overtones…I really don’t know for sure what it is. Even though I love the sound, I was never as fond of their response and flexibility until I tried the LT (lightweight) nickel slides. For me, adding an LT slide produces the ideal combination of tone, response, flexibility, and intonation in a Bach trombone.

The fact that the entire line was designed by one person brings a consistency in both feel and slide positions through the different models that is very useful when you often switch between many sizes of trombones for various musical situations. Although there are more superb brands of trombone available today than ever, Bach still remains the standard to which they are all compared.

Bach LT6 Trombone

The Bach 6 model I consider to be a specialty horn. With a .485 bore and 7 inch bell, not only is it a small trombone but a very light blowing one as well. I’ve never played a standard trombone with as light a feel as the 6. Great for specialized high range playing and lead work, I’ve also heard of it being used on occasion for certain French solo literature. The modern Bach 6 plays quite differently than the vintage models of the 30s and 40s. I have a New York model 6 iv that was made at the Bronx factory in 1942. Even though it has the same bore and bell sizes, it is a gutsy and much bigger blowing horn than the modern Bach 6. It was obviously intended to be more of an all purpose trombone in those days and really plays surprisingly bigger than you would expect for its size. They both are quite enjoyable to play in the right context and situation.

This instrument review was with a Monette TS 11  mouthpiece.

Bach LT8G Trombone

The Bach 8 model is a smaller .490 bore trombone similar in size to the King 2B. As with Bach in general, it is a heavier horn than the 2B. I tend to over blow the 2B a bit, so the 8 is more to my taste. If you want something with the feel of a 2B, it is probably not for you. Even so, the 8 is very flexible and responsive with a great, bright sound. I like it with the gold brass bell which mellows it out just a bit without loosing too much of its bite. It makes a fine lead or jazz horn, and is good for commercial work where a smaller trombone is desired. It is a terrific trombone to play if you can find one. Unfortunately, both the Bach 8 and 6 models are no longer in production at this time.

This instrument review was with a Monette TS 11  mouthpiece.

Specifications

Bach LT6 Trombone
"Stradivarius" - .485" medium bore, 7" one-piece yellow brass bell, lightweight nickel silver outer handslide tubes, chrome-plated nickel silver seamless inner slide, nickel silver handgrip, tubular nickel silver body braces, removable gold-plated balance weight, clear lacquer finish. Comes with genuine Vincent Bach small shank mouthpiece and zippered Cordura covered wood shell case.

Bach LT8G Trombone
"Stradivarius" - .490" medium bore, 7-1/2" one-piece gold brass bell, lightweight nickel silver outer handslide tubes, chrome-plated nickel silver seamless inner slide, nickel silver handgrip, tubular nickel silver body braces, removable gold-plated balance weight, clear lacquer finish. Comes with genuine Vincent Bach small shank mouthpiece and zippered Cordura covered wood shell case.

See More Reviews of Bach Stradivarius Trombones

Sours: https://www.norlanbewley.com/bach6-8.htm
Bach’s Passicagllia performed by the Trombones of the BBC Orchestra \u0026 Choirs

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