20 cent coin australian

20 cent coin australian DEFAULT

Twenty Cents

1966 - 1994
An impression of a platypus designed and sculpted by Stuart Devlin

1966

1966

1967

1968

1969

1970

1971

1972

1973

1974

1975

1976

1977

1978

1979

1980

1981

1981

1981

1982

1983

1984

1985

30.0

28.2

83.8

40.5

16.5

23.7

8.9

16.6

23.4

33.5

53.3

59.8

41.3

37.4

22.3

84.4

65.5

50.0

50.0

76.6

55.1

27.8

2.7

RML

RAM

RAM

RAM

RAM

RAM

RAM

RAM

RAM

RAM

RAM

RAM

RAM

RAM

RAM

RAM

RAM

RMLL

RCM

RAM

RAM

RAM

RAM

No twenty cent coins were produced in 1986 or 1987

1986

1987

-

-

-

-

1988
An impression of a platypus designed and sculpted by Stuart Devlin

1988

0.2

RAM

No twenty cent coins were produced in 1989 - 1993

1989

1990

1991

1992

1993

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1994
An impression of a platypus designed and sculpted by Stuart Devlin

1994

14.3

RAM

Celebrating the 50th anniversary of the United Nations

1995

4.8

RAM

1996 - 2001
An impression of a platypus designed and sculpted by Stuart Devlin

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

20.6

16.7

28.8

64.2

35.6

82.0

RAM

RAM

RAM

RAM

RAM

RAM

Celebrating the life and achievements of Sir Donald Bradman

2001

10.0

RAM

Centenary of Federation Student Design winner for the Australian Capital Territory,

Stacy Jo-Ann Paine of Caroline Chisholm High School

2001

2.1

RAM

Centenary of Federation Student Design winner for New South Wales,

Joseph Neve of Bellingen High School

2001

3.2

RAM

Centenary of Federation Student Design winner for Norfolk Island,

Megan Cummings of Norfolk Island Central School

2001

2.2

RAM

Centenary of Federation Student Design winner for Northern Territory,

Lisa Brett of Leanyer School

2001

2.1

RAM

Centenary of Federation Student Design winner for Queensland,

Jenifer Gray of Ingham State High School

2001

2.3

RAM

Centenary of Federation Student Design winner for South Australia,

Lisa Murphy of Yankalilla Area School

2001

2.4

RAM

Centenary of Federation Student Design winner for Tasmania,

Abbey MacDonald of Launceston Church Grammar School

2001

2.2

RAM

Centenary of Federation Student Design winners for Victoria,

Ryan Douglas Ladd and Mark Aaron Kennedy of Lara Lake Primary School

2001

2.9

RAM

Centenary of Federation Student Design winner for Western Australia, 

Janice Ng of Forrestfield Senior High School

2001

2.4

RAM

An impression of a platypus designed and sculpted by Stuart Devlin

2002

27.2

RAM

Commemorating Australia’s volunteers

2003

7.6

RAM

An impression of a platypus designed and sculpted by Stuart Devlin

2004

2005

72.1

58.6

RAM

RAM

Commemorating the 60th anniversary of the end of World War 2. 

Inspired by a photograph in the Australian War Memorial collection of a soldier returning home to his family

2005

33.5

RAM

An impression of a platypus designed and sculpted by Stuart Devlin

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

102.3

42.7

132.9

43.6

59.9

RAM

RAM

RAM

RAM

RAM

Commemorating the Centenary of Australian Taxation Office

2010

11.6

RAM

Commemorating International Women’s Day

2011

6.8

RAM

Commemorating the Royal Wedding of Prince William and Catherine Middleton

2011

10.1

RAM

Commemorating International Year of Volunteers

2011

6.1

RAM

An impression of a platypus designed and sculpted by Stuart Devlin

2011

2012

15.1

34.6

RAM

RAM

Commemorating the Centenary of Canberra

2013

6.2

RAM

An impression of a platypus designed and sculpted by Stuart Devlin

2013

2014

2015

2016

43.9

55.91

24.4

34.4

RAM

RAM

RAM

RAM

2016 obverse design to celebrate the 50th anniversary of decimal currency

2016

4.5

RAM

An impression of a platypus designed and sculpted by Stuart Devlin

2017

2018

         2019 (IRB)
        2019 (JC)
  2020

29.8

22.1

23.0
3.0
TBA

RAM

RAM

RAM
RAM
RAM

Sours: https://www.ramint.gov.au/twenty-cents

Aussies – You could have a $2,500 coin in your change right now

Is there a $2,500 coin in your pocket right now? Would you know it if there was?

The fact is there are several hidden treasures available to find in ordinary circulating currency. Through all Australian coin denominations you can find - if you know what you're looking for - a variety of coins worth anything from a few dollars to a few thousand dollars!

To help people understand what they need to look for in their change, Downies.com has released this helpful infographic on the Australian 20 cent coin. More infographics will follow shortly on everything from the now defunct one and two cent coins, all the way up to our highest denomination circulating release, the two dollar.

While you're discovering treasures in your change, also check out our One Dollar Infographic, which could reveal a $6,000 coin in your change!

Infographic




20centbanner_1_


Sours: https://www.downies.com/know-your-currency-20-cent
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Australian twenty-cent coin

Current denomination of Australian currency

The Australian twenty-cent coin of the Australian decimal currency system was issued with conversion to decimal currency on 14 February 1966,[1] replacing the florin which was worth two shillings – a tenth of a pound. (The Australian pound was converted to two Australian dollars.)

To date, four different obverse face designs have been used: from 1966 to 1984, the head of Queen Elizabeth II by Arnold Machin; from 1985 to 1998, the head by Raphael Maklouf; from 1999 to 2019, the head by Ian Rank-Broadley; and since 2019, the head by Jody Clark. The obverse has the inscription AUSTRALIA and the year-of-issue on the right hand side, and ELIZABETH II on the left hand side.

From 1966 to 1994, the design for the reverse face was Stuart Devlin's platypus. With the exception of commemorative issues, it continues to be the standard design for the reverse face.[1]

The United Nations 20c was the first commemorative coin issued for circulation in 1995.[1]

Five-cent, ten-cent, twenty-cent, and fifty-cent coins are legal tender up to the sum of $5.[2]

Commemorative coins[edit]

Main article: Australian commemorative coins

There have been various commemorative issues with following reverse face designs:[1]

  • 1995: 50th Anniversary of the United Nations (with the UN emblem).
  • 2001: Commemoration for Sir Donald Bradman (1908–2001).
  • 2001: Centenary of Australian Federation: a set of nine coins; six for the states, two for the territories and one for Norfolk Island.[1] The designs were made by students from each of the areas.[1]
  • 2003: Commemorating Australia's Volunteers. "AUSTRALIA'S VOLUNTEERS - MAKING A DIFFERENCE"
  • 2005: 60 years since the end of the Second World War, with WORLD WAR 1939-1945 COMING HOME. The design was inspired by a photo from the Australian War Memorial collection.
  • 2010: Centenary of the Australian Taxation Office.
  • 2011: Wedding of HRH Prince William and Catherine Middleton: Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.
  • 2011: Centenary of International Women's Day.
  • 2011: 10th anniversary of the International Year of Volunteers. (IYV +10)
  • 2013: Centenary of Canberra
  • 2016: 50th Anniversary of decimal currency - unusually for Australian coins, this is a commemorative obverse; the reverse is as normal.

Varieties[edit]

Excepting commemorative varieties, there have been a number of varieties of regular issue coins identified by collectors, on both the obverse and reverse faces. The first of these seen is a highly prized variety of the 1966 issue, with a "wave" on the top of the bottom stroke of the 2 in "20" on the reverse face. These coins are now sold for over $200, depending on condition. Other varieties of the reverse face generally involve the length and number of the claws of the platypus. These are prone to change if incorrect stamping pressure is used in creation of dies for the coins. Such variations are most frequently seen on coins produced at foreign mints.[citation needed]

For the Broadley head obverse, to date there have been several variations:[3]

  • 1999 with thicker lettering.
  • 2000–2003 slightly reduced lettering by 0.01 mm.
  • The 2004 issue had two forms:
    • "the small head": a head reduced all around by 2 mm, and thicker lettering. The version was in general circulation.
    • "the large head": an issue identical to the 2000–03 obverse. This version was only available in mint packs though, it is rarely found in circulation.
  • 2005 non-commemorative and subsequent issues have reverted to "the large head" obverse.
  • The 2005 WWII commemorative issue had an even larger head.

1981 Mintings[edit]

In 1981, a large number of 20-cent coins were required, far more than the capacity of the Royal Australian Mint facility in Canberra, leading to some coins being minted at other facilities. The Canadian impression of the 20-cent coin is known as the "Ottawa Mint" version, which may be misleading as, post 1976, the Ottawa Mint only produced precious metal commemorative coins, like the Perth Mint, meaning the coins may have been produced at the Royal Canadian Mint's[1] Winnipeg facilities.

Due to differences in the milling and annealing process, the Canadian variety of the 1981 20-cent coin is distinctive to attentive collectors and even cash handlers. The top and bottom edges of the milling is rounded over, not squared like the Australian and London varieties, and despite being in circulation for well over 25 years, even when well worn, the fields remain shiny, and not dulled like those produced at other mints. These qualities are also observed in Canadian coinage of similar ages.

Some of the Canadian coins were produced with a shortened first toe on the right claw. These are referred to as the "3+1⁄2 claw" variety.

Mintages[edit]

The quantity of 1981 and 1982 mintages of the 20-cent coin was sufficient to not require many coins released for circulation until 1990.

The 1983 and 1984 coins were struck for circulation with mintages of 55.11 million and 27.82 million coins respectively, but were never released for general circulation. Later they were resmelted by the Royal Australian Mint, leaving the coins relatively rare. Significant premiums have been paid for a small number of mint rolls from these years that have shown up in auctions.

The Royal Australian Mint website reports an issue of 2.7 million coins for 1985, but no 20c was minted for 1988. None were released in 1983-84 and there were no coins minted for circulation in 1986–1993 and 1995 (Standard platypus design only) [1][3][4][5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_twenty-cent_coin
Australia 1966 20 cent coin mintmarks

The tiny detail that makes this 20 cent coin worth a small fortune

A rare feature on some 20 cent pieces could help skyrocket their value to prospective coin collectors.

On most Australian 20 cent coins, the base of the number two is a straight line.

In the video above: A rare one dollar coin could be worth thousands

However, in a series of coins released in 1966, the base has a slight curve in the shape of a wave.

Though it’s a minor detail, it can multiply its value to collectors hundred-fold.

One of the coins is selling on eBay for $300, with members in a coin collecting Facebook group saying the same coin could go for up to $800.

The Royal Australian Mint, which manufactures Australia’s coins, says it tries to limit mistakes or misprints and understands why “error coins” become circulated.

However, even with the strict screening process, it’s impossible to say exactly how many have made their way into Aussie wallets.

“Due to the rarity of these coins, avid coin collectors are continually on the hunt in effort to add these valuable coins to their collections,” a spokeswoman for the Mint told 7NEWS.com.au.

Rare $1 mule selling for $4000

A rare Australian one dollar coin, known as a ‘mule’, is being sold at auction for more than $4,000.

A mix up at a mint in 2000 created a rare $1/10c hybrid - also called a mule coin - which is valued by rare coin collectors at thousands of times its face value.

And while at first glance, the mule looks like any other gold coin, a closer look reveals a couple of crucial differences, including a double rimmed edge.

The coin was made when a technician at the Royal Australian Mint accidentally paired the kangaroo-patterned ‘tails’ side of the coin with the ‘head’ of a 10c piece, explains the Australian Coin Collecting Blog.

Sours: https://7news.com.au/business/money/the-tiny-detail-that-makes-this-20-cent-coin-worth-a-small-fortune-c-1529281

Australian coin 20 cent

Rare Australian 20 Cent Coins

The Australian 20 cent coin was first minted in 1966 and in it’s more than 50 year history there are some rare Australian 20 cent coins that are sought after by collectors. In this article we’ll talk about the 4 rare Australian 20c coins you can look out for in your change and do our best to assign a value to them.

1. Australian 1966 London 20 Cent Wavy Baseline Variety

About half of the Australian 1966 20 cent coins were struck by the Royal Mint in London. For some reason one of reverse (tails) dies used in London was damaged and touched up resulting in a distinctive ‘Wave’ on the baseline of the 2 on the reverse of the coin. The so called ‘1966 Wavy Baseline 20 cent’ is the most sought after rare Australian 20 cent coin. Why? Because even a banged up one that has been circulating for 55 years can still be worth a couple of hundred dollars. If you’re really lucky you might find one in pristine condition in an old coin collection or money box, and that 1966 Wavy Baseline 20c could be worth $2,000 or more. How do you know if you have one of these rare 20 cent coins? Firstly your coin must be a 1966 and secondly it must have the distinctive Wave on the baseline of the 2. Checkout the image below, with the rare 20c you’re looking for on the left.

Wavy Baseline (Left), Regular Coin (Right)

Wavy Baseline (Left), Regular Coin (Right)

2. Australian 20 Cent Coins Struck on Wrong Planchets

Sometimes blanks for other coins get mixed up with twenty cent blanks and then a 20c is struck on these wrong planchets. For an especially rare Australian 20 cent coin you’d be super lucky to find one that is not only struck on the wrong blank, but is struck on a wrong blank from ANOTHER COUNTRY. This has happened several times during the lifetime of the 20c coin. Twenty cent coins from the 1970’s have been found struck on Thai temple token blanks and blanks of coins from Nepal. In the 1980’s a very small number were struck on scalloped Hong Kong $2 planchets. In this century a few have been found struck on bi-metal planchets possibly from Iran. How much is a 20 cent coin struck on a foreign planchet worth? Anywhere from several hundred dollars to several thousand dollars. See below a rare 2001 20 cent coin struck on a 10.7g bi-metal planchet.

2001 20 Cent on Bi-Metal Planchet

3. Australian 2001 Upset 20 Cent Error

At least one obverse die was loose during the production process of 2001 Platypus 20 cent coins which resulted in coins being struck with varying degrees of die upset. These hard to find upset die error 20 cent coins have appeared on the market with mostly small degrees of upset (less than 30°). They have popped up occasionally with large upset angles including the full 180°. What are they worth? The small upsets are worth perhaps $5-$10, while the big obvious upsets can be worth $100 or more! Certainly an Australian 20 cent coin to look out for.

Rare 2001 20c with 160 degree upset

4. Australian 1981 3 1/2 Claw 20 Cent

Industrial action at the Royal Australian Mint in 1980 and 1981 saw it outsource some coin production to the Royal Mint branches in Wales and Canada. Canada struck most of the 1981 dated 20 cent coins and included a die marker on the reverse of the platypus design to indicate they’d made the coin. The first claw of the left paw of the platypus is half the length giving the variety the name “3 1/2 claw” 20c. While not a rare coin it is quite hard to find in uncirculated condition. Circulated 3 1/2 claw 1981 20c are only worth face value, but uncirculated examples are worth $50+ and well worth looking out for.

1981 31/2 Claw 20 Cent Coin

Posted in Collecting Coins

Sours: https://www.australian-coins.com/collecting-coins/rare-australian-20-cent-coins/
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