Route 21 ohio

Route 21 ohio DEFAULT

Book explores Rt. 21 from beginning to end

When Rob Musson was six, he went to Florida on a family vacation. Returning home to Akron, they traveled at night on portions of state Route 21 in the Carolinas and Virginia.

When Rob Musson was six, he went to Florida on a family vacation. Returning home to Akron, they traveled at night on portions of state Route 21 in the Carolinas and Virginia.

“I was impressed even then by the hills and curves, and going through the small mountain towns,” said Musson. “It was just so different than Ohio.”  

In the summer of 1985, Musson, with two friends, traveled the entire length of the original route, from Public Square in Cleveland to the Atlantic Ocean in South Carolina, a trip that too more than four days.

“I took a lot of pictures and logged the entire trip, just in case I ever decided to write a book about it,” said Musson.

Musson’s friends thought it was all a big joke, but 25 years later, he did exactly that. The result is “Readin’,  Writin’ & Route 21,” a book that focuses on the pre-Interstate highway that began ran from Cleveland to South Carolina, and through Tuscarawas County.

Musson is a vascular surgeon who specialized in venous disease. He lives in Medina with his wife Jennifer and their three daughters, Ana, Alex, and Athena. He has written several other books, including one on varicose veins and others on the history of the Ohio brewing industry.

Recently, Musson took time to answer several questions for The Times-Reporter. Here’s what he had to say:

How much research was involved in writing the book? I had done a lot of research of various aspects of the road as far back as 1985, although so many more sources of information are available now through the Internet. A book of this type would have been nowhere near as complete without the Internet. Much of the information in the book describes the route’s course through the five states through which it travels. I tried to include local history for each town which Route 21 passed through, and other interesting stories that took place along the route, such as the crash of the Shenandoah airship in 1925 in southern Ohio.

How long did it take to write the book? Once I actually committed myself to writing the book (the week before my youngest daughter was born, oddly enough), the actual writing took roughly one year.

Is there any significance to the title? The title is the punchline to an old joke from the 1940s, told in Ohio. The Three R’s in school were always readin’, ritin’, and ‘rithmetic, but because so many West Virginians traveled up Route 21 to work in Akron’s tire factories, the joke was that the three R’s in West Virginia schools were ‘readin, ‘ritin, and Route 21. Interestingly enough, the tire companies actively recruited workers from West Virginia, because they were seen as hard working and less likely than immigrant laborers to become unionized.

Where did you come up with all the pictures? I began collecting postcards of scenes along Route 21 more than 10 years ago. I also have taken many photos myself during my travels along the road, and have found old maps on eBay which have helped show how the road has been rerouted over the years. Overall there are nearly 500 images in the book.

Can you tell us three things about the book (or its writing) that people might not realize?

1. Several sections of old Route 21 in Ohio were previously stagecoach lines from city to city. These roads were paved when the Federal Highway System was established in the 1920s. Before that, some of these roads were old Native American trails that may have been established hundreds of years earlier.

2. Traveling from one point to another along old Route 21 takes almost exactly twice the amount of time that it takes to travel between the same points on Interstate 77, which eventually replaced Route 21.

3. Route 21 was eliminated in Ohio in 1971, although it remains in place today from Wytheville, VA. south to the Atlantic Ocean at Hunting Island, SC. The old roads in Ohio are known variously as Rt. 21 from Cleveland to Strasburg, County Road 21 in Tuscarawas County, and state Route 821 from Byesville to Marietta.

Where can people purchase the book? The easiest way to get it is from my website, www.ZeppPublications.com, where it is available for $21.95 with free shipping.

Sours: https://www.timesreporter.com/x600912758/Book-explores-Rt-21-from-beginning-to-end

State Route 21 is a relic of an old U.S. Route 21, a major north–south highway that connected greater Cleveland, Ohio, to southern South Carolina. South of Strasburg, Ohio, near the current southern terminus of State Route 21, the designation of U.S. Route 21 was moved to the new Interstate 77 freeway in east-central and southeastern Ohio by the early 1970s and then decommissioned. North of Strasburg, what remained of U.S. Route 21 as a route separate from Interstate 77 became State Route 21.

State Route 21 survives in Greater Cleveland as a divided surface road between its current northern terminus at Interstate 77 and Interstate 480 and Interstate 77 just south of the Ohio Turnpike, serving some of the suburbs of Cleveland as a local through route. It coincides with Interstate 77 between two junctions at mileposts 146 and 135 (from north to south) and again splits, State Route 21 passing through Barberton and Massillon, Interstate 77 passing through the much larger cities of Akron and Canton. State Route 21 has its southern terminus north of Strasburg at U.S. 250 near Interstate 77's Exit 87.

Very heavily traveled before the Interstate era, much of State Route 21 is divided highway or even freeway due to the needs of the time.

The road is notable for the reindeer spotted on it in December 2011 in Norton.

All exits are unnumbered.


Sours: https://roadnow.com/us/mi/road_desc.php?u=oh-21
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Ohio State Route 21

For other uses, see Ohio State Route 21 (disambiguation).

"OH 21" redirects here. OH 21 may also refer to Ohio's 21st congressional district.

State Route 21 (SR 21) is a north–south state highway in the northeastern portion of the U.S. state of Ohio. The southern terminus of SR 21 is north of Strasburg on U.S. Route 250. The northern terminus of SR 21 is at an interchange with Interstate 77 in Cuyahoga Heights.

Route description[edit]

The southern terminus of SR 21 is on US 250 in Franklin Township, Tuscarawas County, north of Strasburg and about 3.1 miles (5.0 km) north of I-77 exit 87. At the intersection, westbound US 250, which had been heading north–northwest, turns to the west while its roadway continues as SR 21. The route is an undivided, two-lane road.

SR 21 proceeds through Franklin Township. At the line with Bethlehem Township, Stark County, the route crosses SR 212 (Dolphin Street SW) and takes the name Erie Avenue SW. As the route enters Navarre, it takes on the character of a small-town street, taking the name Main Street, then enters a concurrency with US 62 at Canal Street. As the route continues through Navarre, it begins to pick up turn lanes. In northern Navarre, the route becomes three lanes, adding a center left-turn lane. Crossing out of Navarre and briefly returning to Bethlehem Township, the route resumes the Erie Avenue SW name. The route next proceeds into Perry Township, then crosses briefly through and skirts the edge of Massillon.

SR 21 later crosses into both Summit County and Norton. Just after, there is an interchange with SR 585 and Wooster Road that has an unusual configuration. It is a hybrid combination interchange with a left-hand flyover ramp from eastbound SR 585 to northbound SR 21. Eastbound Wooster Road just west of the interchange crosses the ramp from eastbound SR 585 to southbound SR 21 at-grade and merges with the loop ramp from southbound SR 21 to eastbound Wooster Road. Additionally, Wooster Road leads to Barberton.

SR 21 merges onto I-77 (exit 136) in Copley Township and remains in a concurrency with the interstate until reaching exit 145 in Richfield, where it departs the interstate. SR 21 next passes under the Ohio Turnpike. It then passes through Brecksville and into Independence, where it crosses Interstate 480 on an overpass immediately east of I-480's interchange with I-77. It next passes briefly through Valley View and into Cuyahoga Heights.

In Cuyahoga Heights, SR 21 reaches its northern terminus at I-77 exit 157.

History[edit]

SR 21 follows the route of the old U.S. Route 21, a major north–south highway that connected greater Cleveland, Ohio, to southern South Carolina. South of Strasburg, Ohio, near the current southern terminus of SR 21, the designation of US 21 was moved to the new Interstate 77 freeway in east-central and southeastern Ohio by the early 1970s and then decommissioned. North of Strasburg, what remained of US 21 as a route separate from I-77 became SR 21.

While I-77 directly serves the larger cities of Canton, Akron and Cleveland, SR 21 connects the smaller communities of Massillon and Norton (and indirectly connects to Barberton), and serves some Northeast Ohio and Greater Cleveland suburbs as a local through route.

Very heavily traveled before the Interstate era, much of SR 21 is divided highway or even freeway due to the needs of the time.

Junction list[edit]

All exits are unnumbered.

References[edit]

Route map:

Template:Attached KML/Ohio State Route 21

KML is from Wikidata

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ohio_State_Route_21
Route 21 - East 21st St. - Outbound

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